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Full text of "Facebook MZSOL"

Facebook 

for Grown-Ups 







'. 




Michael Miller 



Use Facebook 

to Reconnect with Old Friends, 

Family, and Co-Workers 



Facebook 

^Grown-Ups 



Michael Miller 



QUE' 

800 East 96th Street, 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46240 USA 



Facebook® for Grown-Ups 

Copyright © 2011 by Pearson Education, Inc. 

All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or 
transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without 
written permission from the publisher. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the 
information contained herein. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this 
book, the publisher and author assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Nor is any liability 
assumed for damages resulting from the use of the information contained herein. 

ISBN-13: 978-0-7897-4712-9 
ISBN-10: 0-7897-471 2-X 

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data 
Miller, Michael, 1958- 

Facebook for grown-ups / Michael Miller, 
p. cm. 

Includes index. 

ISBN 978-0-7897-4712-9 

1 . Facebook (Electronic resource) 2. Online social networks. 3. Social networks—Computer 
network resources. I. Title. 



HM742.M55 2011 
006.7'54-dc22 



Printed in the United States on America 



2010035622 



First Printing: October 2010 
Trademarks 

All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks have been 
appropriately capitalized. Que Publishing cannot attest to the accuracy of this information. Use 
of a term in this book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark or service 
mark. 



Associate Publisher 

Greg Wiegand 

Acquisitions Editor 

Michelle Newcomb 

Development Editor 

The Wordsmithery 

Technical Editor 

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Managing Editor 

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Project Editor 

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Indexer 

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Proofreader 

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Publishing Coordinator 

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Warning and Disclaimer 

Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no 
warranty or fitness is implied. The information provided is on an "as is" basis. The author and the 
publisher shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any 
loss or damages arising from the information contained in this book. 

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chases or special sales. For more information, please contact 



Cover Designer 

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Contents at a Glance 

Introduction 

Part I: Getting Started with Facebook— and Social Networking 5 

1 Welcome to Facebook— It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 7 

2 Signing Up and Getting Started 23 

3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 37 

Part II: Facebook for Friends and Family 49 

4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 51 

5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 67 

6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 85 

7 Organizing Your Friends List 93 

Part III: Keeping in Touch with Facebook 103 

8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 105 

9 Exchanging Private Messages 125 

10 Chatting with Your Kids- Live 137 

Part IV: Sharing Your Life on Facebook 145 

11 Sharing Family Pictures 147 

12 Sharing Home Movies 167 

13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 185 

Part V: Doing More with Facebook 197 

14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 199 

15 Becoming a Fan 213 

16 Meeting Others in Groups 221 

17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 235 

18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 243 

19 Using Facebook on the Go 257 

20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 273 

Part VI: Basic Facebook Housekeeping Chores 287 

21 Keeping Some Things Private 289 

22 Managing Your Facebook Account 303 
Index 313 



IV 

Table of Contents 

Introduction 1 

How This Book Is Organized 2 

Conventions Used in This Book 3 

Get Ready to Facebook 4 

Part I: Getting Started with Facebook— and Social Networking 5 

1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 7 
What Social Networking Is and How It Works 7 

What Is a Social Network? 8 

Why Do People Use Social Networks? 8 

What Other Stuff Does a Social Network Do? 1 

Who Uses Social Networks? 1 

How Did Social Networks Develop? 1 1 

Say Hello to Facebook 1 2 

Things You Can— and Can't— Do on Facebook 14 

Things to Do 14 

Things Not to Do 16 

Why Grown-Ups Use Facebook 17 

Social Networking Do's and Don'ts 19 

Do These Things 19 

Don't Do These Things 20 

2 Signing Up and Getting Started 23 
Before You Sign Up 23 
Creating a Facebook Account 24 
Find Friends and Complete Your Profile 25 
Filling Out Your Profile 29 

3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 37 
What's What and What's Where on Facebook 37 

Signing In 37 

Welcome to the Home Page 38 

Profile Pages 41 

Navigating the Facebook Toolbar 42 

Searching Facebook 44 

Signing Off 46 



Table of Contents I V 

Part II: Facebook for Friends and Family 49 

4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 51 
How Facebook Helps You Reconnect 51 
Why Friends Are Important 53 
Making Friends with People You're Already in Contact With 54 

Finding Friends You Email 54 

Finding Friends You Instant Message 56 

Finding Co-Workers 57 

Searching for Long Lost Friends 58 

Finding Former Co-Workers 58 

Finding Former Classmates 59 

Searching by Name or Email Address 60 

Accepting Friend Requests 61 

Exploring Facebook's Friend Suggestions 62 

Finding Friends of Friends 63 

5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 67 
Catching Up with the Facebook News Feed 67 

Viewing the News Feed 67 

Viewing More Updates from More Friends 70 

Viewing Only Status Updates from Your Friends 71 

Hiding Friends You Don't Like 71 

Hiding Updates from Applications and Games 72 

Commenting on Friends' Posts 73 

Liking What You See 74 

Sharing a Posted Attachment 75 

Getting to and Getting to Know Your Friends' Profile Pages 76 

Displaying a Profile Page 76 

Navigating a Profile Page 77 

Reading the Wall— and Leaving Your Own Comments 79 

Viewing Your Friends' Personal Information 80 

Looking at Photos 81 

Viewing Other Tabs 82 

6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 85 
Making Your Children Your Friends 85 
What to Do If Your Kids Hide from You on Facebook 86 

Viewing Updates Without Being a Friend 86 

Viewing Updates as a Friend of a Friend 86 

Creating a Surreptitious Identity 87 



VI I FACEBOOK FOR GROWN-UPS 

Using Facebook to See What Your Kids Are Up To 89 

Using Facebook to Contact Your Grown Kids 90 

7 Organizing Your Friends List 93 
Creating Friends Lists 93 
Editing Your Lists 95 
Displaying Status Updates from List Members 97 
Deleting Custom Lists 98 
Getting Rid of Unwanted Friends 98 
Blocking Unwanted Users 99 

Part III: Keeping in Touch with Facebook 103 

8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 105 
What Is a Status Update? 1 05 
Where to Update Your Status 1 07 
How to Update Your Status 1 08 

Posting a Simple Text Update 108 

Attaching a Photo 109 

Attaching a Video 1 1 

Attaching an Event 1 1 1 

Attaching a Link to Another Web Page 1 1 2 

Tagging a Friend in a Post 113 

Determining Who Sees Your Status Updates 114 

Setting Universal Status Privacy 115 

Setting Who Can View Individual Updates 1 1 7 

Deleting an Accidental Status Update 118 

Deciding What to Write About 1 1 8 

Employing "Facebook Grammar" 121 

9 Exchanging Private Messages 125 
Understanding Facebook's Private Messages 125 
It's Just Like Email -Except It Isn't 126 
Reading and Replying to Messages 127 
Deleting Messages 1 29 
Sending a New Message 130 
Adding Attachments to a Message 131 

Attaching a Picture 131 

Attaching a Video 132 

Attaching a Web Link 133 



Table of Contents I VII 

10 Chatting with Your Kids— Live 137 
What's Chat- and Who Uses It? 1 37 

Understanding Instant Messaging 137 

Welcome to Facebook Chat 138 

Who's Chatting with Whom? 139 

Who's Online to Chat With? 1 39 

Doing the Chat Thing 1 41 

Managing Your Chat Settings 143 

Part IV: Sharing Your Life on Facebook 145 

11 Sharing Family Pictures 147 
What's Good— and What's Bad— About Sharing Photos on Facebook 147 

Facebook Photos: The Good 148 

Facebook Photos: The Bad 148 

So Is Facebook Good for Photo Sharing, or Not? 149 

Creating a Photo Album 151 

Uploading New Photos 152 

Editing, Moving, and Deleting Photos 154 

Tagging People in Your Photos 155 

Sharing Photos with Others 1 57 

Managing Your Photos and Albums 1 58 

Viewing Other People's Photos 160 

Viewing Photos and Photo Albums 160 

Adding Your Comments 162 

Tagging Yourself in a Photo 163 

Sharing a Photo 163 

Printing a Photo 163 

Downloading a Photo 163 

Downloading Multiple Photos 164 

12 Sharing Home Movies 167 
The Ins and Outs of Sharing Videos on Facebook 167 

Shooting Videos for Facebook 167 

What to Upload 168 

Editing Your Videos 1 69 

Uploading Your Videos 1 69 

Displaying the Video Tab 170 

Uploading a Video File 170 

Recording a Webcam Video 172 



VIII I FACEBOOK FOR GROWN-UPS 

Editing Video Information 174 

Sharing Uploaded Videos 175 

Posting YouTube Videos 177 

Watching Your Friends' Videos 180 

Watching a Video in the News Feed 180 

Watching a Video on Its Own Page 181 

Viewing Your Friends' Most Recent Videos 182 

1 3 Sharing Birthdays and Events 1 85 
Why You Might Like Events 185 
Searching for and Attending Events 186 
RSVP'ing to Events 188 

RSVP'ing from the Event Page 188 

RSVP'ing from a Status Update 190 

RSVP'ing from an Email Invitation 191 

Creating New Events 192 

Viewing Your Events 1 94 

Celebrating Birthdays 194 

Part V: Doing More with Facebook 197 

14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 199 
What Can You Personalize on Your Profile Page— and Why Would You Want To? 199 
Choosing What Posts to Display on Your Wall 200 
Changing Other Wall Settings 201 
Changing Your Profile Picture 203 
Customizing the Tabs on Your Profile Page 205 
Managing Sidebar Boxes 206 

Adding New Boxes 206 

Rearranging Boxes 207 

Deleting Boxes 207 

Editing What You See in Sidebar Boxes 207 

Editing Your Profile Information 208 

15 Becoming a Fan 213 
Understanding Fan Pages 213 

The Fan Page as Fan Club 213 

Liking a Page 215 

Navigating a Fan Page 215 

Finding Fan Pages 216 



Table of Contents I IX 

Creating Your Own Fan Page 21 7 

Create a New Page 218 

Invite Others to Become Fans 219 

1 6 Meeting Others in Groups 221 
Understanding Facebook Groups 221 

Group Activities 222 

Running the Group 223 

Finding and Joining Groups 224 

Viewing Your Groups— and Your Friends' Groups 225 

Participating in a Group 226 

Creating Your Own Group 228 

Group Administration 229 

Access Levels 229 

Group Features 229 

Creating the Group 229 

Customizing Your Group 231 

Letting Others Know About Your Group 232 

17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 235 
Understanding Facebook Networks 235 
Joining Your Work Network 236 
Networking Professionally 237 

Finding Other Business Professionals on Facebook 237 

Managing Your Professional Contacts 238 

Networking via Facebook Groups 239 

Job Hunting on Facebook 239 

Reworking Your Profile 240 

Becoming a Fan of Potential Employers 241 

Asking for a Job 241 

18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 243 
Understanding Facebook Applications 243 
Discovering Applications and Games 246 

Browsing for Apps 246 

Searching for Apps 247 

Using an Application or Game 247 

Viewing and Managing Your Applications— and Those Your Friends Are Using 249 

Viewing Your Applications and Games 249 

Managing Your Apps and Games 250 

Apps for Grown-Ups 252 



C I FACEBOOK FOR GROWN-UPS 

19 Using Facebook on the Go 257 
Connecting from Your iPhone 257 

Viewing the News Feed 259 

Posting a Status Update 261 

Posting a Picture 262 

Viewing Friends' Profiles 265 

Checking Messages 265 

Chatting with Friends 266 

Connecting from Other Smartphones 267 

Connecting via Text Message 269 

20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 273 
Understanding the Facebook Marketplace 273 
Shopping for Something to Buy 275 

Browsing the Marketplace 275 

Searching the Marketplace 277 

Viewing an Item Listing 278 

Sharing and Commenting on a Listing 279 

Contacting a Seller— and Buying Something 280 

Selling Your Own Stuff 281 

Listing an Item for Sale 281 

Ending Your Listing 283 

Part VI: Basic Facebook Housekeeping Chores 287 

21 Keeping Some Things Private 289 
Understanding Facebook Privacy 289 
Changing Facebook's Privacy Settings 291 

Sharing Your Personal Information — or Not 291 

Setting Custom Sharing Options 293 

Hiding Your Information from Other Websites 295 

Removing Unwanted Fan Pages 297 

What to Keep Private— and What to Share 298 

22 Managing Your Facebook Account 303 
Changing Account Settings 303 
Controlling When and How Facebook Contacts You 306 
Leaving Facebook 307 
Index 313 



XI 

About the Author 

Michael Miller has written more than 100 non-fiction how-to books 
in the past two decades, including Que's Absolute Beginner's Guide 
to Computer Basics, Googlepedia: The Ultimate Google Resource, 
and Windows 7 Your Way. He is also the author of Que's Facebook 
Essentials video and Pearson Higher Education's Introduction to Social 
Networking textbook. 

Mr. Miller has established a reputation for clearly explaining techni- 
cal topics to non-technical readers, and for offering useful real-world 
advice about complicated topics. More information can be found at the 
author's website, located at www.molehillgroup.com. 

Dedication 

To Sherry, we're not getting older— we're getting better. 



Acknowledgments 



Thanks to the usual suspects at Que Publishing, including but not lim- 
ited to Greg Wiegand, Michelle Newcomb, Charlotte Kughen, Andy 
Beaster, and technical editor Vince Averello. And, of course, to all my 
Facebook friends— whether I actually know you or not. 



XII 

We Want to Hear from You! 

As the reader of this book, you are our most important critic and com- 
mentator. We value your opinion and want to know what we're doing 
right, what we could do better, what areas you'd like to see us publish 
in, and any other words of wisdom you're willing to pass our way. 

As an associate publisher for Que Publishing, I welcome your com- 
ments. You can email or write me directly to let me know what you did 
or didn't like about this book— as well as what we can do to make our 
books better. 

Please note that I cannot help you with technical problems related to 
the topic of this book. We do have a User Services group, however, 
where I will forward specific technical questions related to the book. 

When you write, please be sure to include this book's title and author 
as well as your name, email address, and phone number. I will carefully 
review your comments and share them with the author and editors who 
worked on the book. 

Email: feedback@quepublishing.com 

Mail: Greg Wiegand 

Associate Publisher 
Que Publishing 
800 East 96th Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46240 USA 

Reader Services 

Visit our website and register this book at www.quepublishing.com/ 
register for convenient access to any updates, downloads, or errata 
that might be available for this book. 



ffttfodacC/on 



Introduction 



A confession: 

I'm not as young as I used to be. 

Back in the day, I used to be known as a young Turk, a whiz 
kid, a young man with potential. But I'm no longer Turkish, 
don't have a lot of whiz left, and long ago gave up on realiz- 
ing that potential thing. I got older. 

Somewhere along the line I acquired a big house and a 
bigger mortgage, got married (to my high school sweet- 
heart), and inherited kids (well, stepkids) and grandkids 
(also stepped). I look at what all the younger people in my 
household are doing, and realize that I'm not doing anything 
remotely like that anymore. I'm an old guy kind of set in his 
ways— including the way I use technology. 

Now, I write a lot of books about technology. To some 
degree, how a 50 year old person uses Windows is pretty 
much the same as how a 20 year-old person does; Windows 
is Windows, after all. I get by. 

But there's this new thing called social networking. It's tech- 
nology related, because you have to use your computer (or, 
in the case of the youngsters, your cell phone) to do it. And 
from what I've seen, how the young people use social net- 
working is quite a bit different from how my wife and I do it. 
There's a definite generational difference here. 

Which is where this book comes in. Facebook for Grown-Ups 
focuses on the biggest and most happening social network- 
ing site, Facebook, and how people of our generation are 



INTRODUCTION 

using it. Trust me, we don't use Facebook the same way our kids do. It's a 
different experience for us, and one that has to be learned. 

Did you know, for example, that you can use Facebook to keep in touch 
with all your family members— including distant relatives? Or that you can 
find long-lost friends on the Facebook site— including that cute guy you had 
a crush on back in high school? Or that you can share your family photos 
with these friends and relatives? And keep them updated on what you're up 
to these days? 

That's right, grown-ups use Facebook to get connected with the people 
we know today, as well as those we knew in years gone by. We also use 
Facebook to keep tabs on our kids, to drop them a note from time to time, 
and to see what mischief they're getting themselves into. (And they are get- 
ting themselves into mischief, trust me.) 

The key is figuring out how to find all the people you want to find, and to 
share all the information you want to share— without sharing too much per- 
sonal information about yourself. There's a bit of a trick to doing the social 
networking thing while still maintaining a semblance of privacy online. 

I try to cover all that in this book. My focus is on using Facebook, yes, 
but as responsible adults— not as carefree kids. Because, let's face it, we 
haven't been carefree kids for quite some time now. Sad, I know, but true. 



How This Book Is Organized 



If I did my job right, Facebook for Grown-Ups should be a relatively quick but 
useful read. It contains a lot of information about Facebook's various and sun- 
dry features, with an emphasis on how us grown-ups use those features. 

To make things a little easier to grasp, this book is organized into six main 
parts, each focused on a particular major topic: 

• Part I, "Getting Started with Facebook— and Social Networking," pro- 
vides an introduction to this whole social networking thing, and helps you 
sign up for Facebook and find your way around the site. 

• Part II, "Facebook for Friends and Family," is all about finding and com- 
municating with family members and friends on the Facebook site. You 
learn how to get back in touch with old friends (including that cute high 



Conventions Used in This Book 3 

school crush) and how make new ones online. You even learn how to use 
Facebook to keep tabs (or spy) on your kids. Really. 

• Part III, "Keeping in Touch with Facebook," is about the many ways to 
communicate with your friends and family. You learn how to post pubic 
status updates, exchange private messages, and even chat in real time— 
which may be the only way to get face time with your kids. 

• Part IV, "Sharing Your Life on Facebook," is about all the things you can 
share with your friends and family on Facebook. You learn how to share 
photos, home movies, even birthdays and other important events. 

• Part V, "Doing More with Facebook," covers some slightly more 
advanced things you might want to do, including personalizing your Profile 
page, becoming a "fan" of a performer or company, participating in topic- 
oriented groups, using Facebook for business networking and job hunt- 
ing, using Facebook applications and games, accessing Facebook from 
your mobile phone, and buying and selling merchandise in the Facebook 
Marketplace. 

• Part VI, "Basic Facebook Housekeeping Chores," shows you how to 
manage your Facebook account— and configure all those privacy settings 
to keep your personal information private. 

Although I recommend reading the book in consecutive order, you don't 
have to. Read it in chapter order if you want (I think it flows fairly well as 
written), or read just those chapters that interest you. It's okay either way. 

Conventions Used in This Book 

I hope that this book is easy enough to figure out on its own, without requir- 
ing its own instruction manual. As you read through the pages, however, it 
helps to know precisely how I've presented specific types of information. 

As you read through this book you'll note several special elements, presented 
in what we in the publishing business call "margin notes." There are different 
types of margin notes for different types of information, as you see here. 



INTRODUCTION 



Beyond the main text, I end each chapter with 
a kind of sidebar observation. These sections 
aren't necessarily factual, as the rest of the 
text is supposed to be; they're more opinion, 
looking at Facebook from my personal view- 
point. Take 'em or leave 'em; that's up to you. 

One more thing. Facebook is a website, and 
websites seem to change the way they look 
and act on a fairly frequent yet unpredictable 
basis. (In Facebook's case, they changed 
their privacy features about a half-dozen times 
while I was writing the chapter about privacy. 
Thanks a lot, Facebook.) That means that 
what I describe in these pages might look or 
act a little different by the time you get around 
to reading it. So if I talk about a particular but- 
ton that is now a link located somewhere else 
on the page, try to be understanding. You still 
should be able to figure things out. 

Get Ready to Facebook 



L^Note 

This is a note that presents 
some interesting informa- 
tion, even if it isn't wholly 
relevant to the discussion in 
the main text. 



ru^Tip ^ 

This is a tip that might 
prove useful for whatever it 
is you're in the process of 
doing. 



V 



*++4 



r i 



Caution 



a 



This is a warning that some- 
thing you might accidentally 
do might have undesirable 
results— so take care! 



Now that you know how to use this book, ^ ^ 

it's time to get to the heart of the matter. But 

when you're ready to take a break from marveling at how old your friends 
look in their Facebook profiles, browse over to my personal website, located 
at www.molehillgroup.com. Here you can find more information on this book 
and other books I've written — including any necessary corrections and clari- 
fications, in the inevitable event that an error or two creeps into this text. 
(Hey, nobody's perfect!) 

In addition, know that I love to hear from readers of my books. If you want 
to contact me, feel free to email me at facebook4grownups@molehillgroup. 
com. I can't promise that I'll answer every message, but I do promise that 
I'll read each one! 

But enough with the preliminaries. You want to find out what this Facebook 
thing is all about? Then turn the page, and start Facebooking! 



Part | 



Getting Started with 
Facebook— and Social 
Networking 

1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for 
Kids Anymore 

2 Signing Up and Getting Started 

3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 



This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter \ 



Welcome to Facebook: 
It's Not Just for Kids 
Anymore 

Facebook is where all the young people hang out online. 

Now, I know you're only as young as you feel, but if you're 
reading a book called Facebook for Grown-Ups, you're prob- 
ably a tad past your school years. In other words, you're 
not that young anymore. So why should you care about 
Facebook? 

There's a simple answer to that question. No matter what 
your age, Facebook and other social networks help you keep 
in touch with family, friends, and co-workers. Chances are 
you'll find lots of friends already on the site— including, it 
would be fair to wager, all of your children, nieces and neph- 
ews, and grandchildren, if you have them. 

So if you want to keep in touch with (or keep tabs on) your 
kids, Facebook is the place to do it. Facebook is also a great 
place to catch up with old friends, even (and especially) 
those you haven't seen since you all were a lot younger 
than you are today. You see, Facebook isn't just for younger 
users; it's for anyone wanting to keep in touch with anyone 
else. 

What Social Networking Is and 
How It Works 

Let's not get ahead of ourselves. Before we get into what 
Facebook is and what it does, let's take a look at the whole 



8 CHAPTER1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

social networking phenomenon. That's what Facebook is, after all — a social 
network. (And not just any old social network; Facebook is the world's larg- 
est social network. That's why everybody uses it.) 

What Is a Social Network? 

A social network is a large website that hosts a community of users, and 
makes it easy for those users to communicate with one another. Social net- 
works enable users to share experiences and opinions with one another via 
status updates, short text messages that are posted for public viewing by all 
of that person's friends on the site. 

There are lots of social networks out there on the Web. Some, such as 
Linkedln or Flixster, are devoted to a particular topic or community. Others, 
such as Facebook and MySpace, are more broad-based. These general 
social networks make it easy for communities devoted to specific topics to 
develop within the overall site. 

Why Do People Use Social Networks? 

Okay, that's a fairly academic description of what a social network is. But 
what does a social network do— or, more concisely, why do people use a 
social network? 

To my mind, social networks are all about communicating, staying in touch 
with one another. It's the 21st-century way to let people know what you're 
up to — and to find out what everyone else is up to, too. 

In the old, old days, the only way you found out about what was going on 
was for someone to write you a letter. That probably sounds quaint today, 
as letter writing is somewhat out of fashion. But I'm guessing you're old 
enough to have written a few letters in your time, or at least to have seen 
your parents do so. 

Ah, the joys of receiving a letter from an old friend! I miss seeing a friend's 
address in the top left corner, opening the envelope, and savoring the 
words within. Of course, most friends didn't write that often; writing was a 
lot of work, so you saved up your thoughts and experiences until you had a 
full letter's worth. But, man, it was great to read what your friends had been 
doing. It almost made the wait worthwhile. 



What Social Networking Is and How It Works 9 

That was then and this is now. Today, nobody has the time or the patience 
or the attention span to write or read long letters. At some point, a decade 
or so ago, email replaced the written letter as our primary means of corre- 
spondence. That wasn't necessarily a bad thing; emails were shorter than 
written letters, but you got them immediately— and you could respond to 
them immediately, too. With the Internet age came this faster and more 
direct form of communication, and we adapted to it. 

For young people today, however, email is old hat. It's too slow and takes 
too much time. (They'd never have tolerated the age of the written letter...) 
Instead, our attention deprived youth prefer immediate communication, via 
text messages and instant messages and such. 

The problem with all these forms of communication is that they're not cen- 
tralized. If you're text messaging with a dozen friends, that's a dozen differ- 
ent "feeds" of information you have to keep track of. Same thing with instant 
messaging; there's no central repository where you can read all your friends' 
messages in one place. 

This is where social networking comes in. Instead of writing a dozen (or 
a hundred) different letters or emails to each of your friends telling them 
that you just bought a new dress (or car or house or whatever), you make 
a single post that then those dozen (or hundred) different people can read. 
Something happens, you write about it, it gets posted on the social network- 
ing site, and everyone you know reads about it. It takes all the work out of 
keeping your friends up-to-date on what you're doing. 

Of course, it works in the other direction, too. Instead of waiting for letters 
or emails or text messages from each of your friends, you just log onto the 
social networking site. There you find a feed of updates from everyone you 
know. Read the feed and you're instantly updated on what everyone is up 
to. That makes it really easy to keep in touch. 

Now, social networking lets you do a lot more than just exchange status 
updates, but that's the most common activity and the reason most of us do 
the social networking thing. Communications to and from all your friends, 
all in one place, all done in your Web browser from your personal computer. 
(Or, if you're a mobile kind of person, from your cell phone.) It's like commu- 
nications central for everyone you know— close friends or otherwise. 



10 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

What Other Stuff Does a Social Network Do? 

I just mentioned that social networking offers more than simple status 
updates. What is all that other stuff? Here's a short list: 

• Private communications. This can take the form of a built-in email system 
(that is, the email is contained within the social networking site; you don't 
need separate software to use it) or live instant messaging. 

• Groups and forums. These are like online clubs built around specific 
areas of interest. You can find groups for hobbies like woodworking or 
quilting, for topics like politics or sports, for just about anything you can 
think of. There are even groups devoted to specific companies, schools, 
and even entertainers— these last being more like fan clubs than anything 
else. 

• Photo and video sharing. That's right, most social networks let you 
upload your pictures and movies and share them with all your friends on 
the network. 

• Games and applications. If you have too much free time on your hands, 
most social networks include fun games you can play, as well as other 
applications and utilities that add functionality to the site. (For example, 
Facebook offers apps that help you track family members, organize your 
book and music libraries, and such.) 

• Marketplace. Get enough people congregated on a single website, and 
there's a lot of things those people can do together— including buy and 
sell things. Many social networks offer online marketplaces, similar to 
Craigslist classifieds, so that you can find out what other members have 
for sale— or are interested in buying. 

There's a bit more than even all this, including event scheduling and the like, 
but you get the general idea. A social network is an online community, and 
offers many of the same activities that you'd find in a real-world community. 

Who Uses Social Networks? 

With all that social networks have to offer, it's not surprising that so many 
people use them day in and day out. As with many new technologies, social 
networks started out as a thing used by college students. (That's how the 
Internet itself took off, after all.) But over time social networking spread from 



What Social Networking Is and How It Works 1 1 

the young generation into the general public, including old farts like you and 
me. 

Today, the audience for social networking is rapidly evolving. In fact, the 
fastest-growing demographic on the Facebook site are those of us 45 years 
or older. (Take that, you young whippersnappers!) 

In practice, then, social networks are home to all sorts of users, including: 

• Friends and family members who want to keep in touch 

• People looking for long-lost friends 

• Business colleagues who use the site for collaboration and networking 

• Singles who want to meet and match up with other singles 

• Hobbyists looking for others who share their interests 

• Classmates who need study partners and homework advice 

• Musicians, actors, and celebrities connecting with their fans 

And, of course, college and high school students. (That's until they move 
onto the next big thing, of course.) 

How Did Social Networks Develop? 

Interestingly, today's social networks evolved from the earliest dial-up com- 
puter networks, bulletin board systems (BBSs), and other online discussion 
forums. That's right, Facebook and MySpace are only a few steps removed 
from CompuServe, Prodigy, and The WELL. (I assume you're old enough to 
remember some of these services— including the original America Online.) 

These early proto-communities, most of which predated the formal Internet 
in the 1970s and 1980s, offered topic-based discussion forums and chat 
rooms, just like Facebook does today. What they didn't offer was a way to 
follow friends on the site, or to publicly share status updates. But the seeds 
of social networking were there. 

Other components of social networking developed after the rise of the 
public Internet. For example, topic-based website communities, like iVil- 
lage, Epicurious, and Classmates.com, arose in the mid-1990s. Personal 
blogs, which let users post short articles of information and opinion, 



12 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

emerged around the year 2000. And photo-sharing sites, such as Flickr and 
Photobucket, became a part of the Internet landscape in the early 2000s. 

The first site to combine all of these features was Friendster, in 2003. 
Friendster also introduced the concepts of "friends" and "friending" to the 
social Web; it all came from the name, not surprisingly. 

Friendster enjoyed immediate popularity (more than 3 million users within 
the first few months of operations), but ran into technical problems asso- 
ciated with that growth and was soon surpassed by MySpace, which 
launched later the same year. MySpace became the most popular social 
networking site in June 2006, and remained the top social network for 
almost two years. 



Say Hello to Facebook 



The big dog in social networking was part of the second wave. It was 2004 
when a site originally known as "Thefacebook" was introduced. What even- 
tually became known as just "Facebook" was originally intended as a site 
where college students could socialize online. Sensing opportunity beyond 
the college market, however, Facebook opened its site to high school stu- 
dents in 2005, and to users of all ages (actually, users above the age of 13) 
in 2006. 

This broadening in Facebook's user base led to a huge increase in both 
users and pageviews, with Facebook surpassing MySpace in April 2008. 
Facebook is currently the number-two site on the entire Internet, with more 
than 500 million users of all ages. That's a pretty big deal. 

So if you want to social network today, Facebook is the place to do it. 

Facebook is a big honkin' Web community, a 

site that offers a lot of different ways to pub- /^^N f) t P 

licly and privately communicate with lots and 

lots of other people. The phrase " social network " 

can be either a noun or 

Chances are you already know a lot of folks a verb. In practice, then, 

who use Facebook. It goes without saying that Facebook is a social net- 

your kids and their friends are all Facebook work ( noun ) that lets vou 

users; it's a rare youngster, indeed, who social network ^ with 

doesn't have Facebook as his or her browser 



Say Hello to Facebook 



13 



home page. But it's not just the younger generation. You'll also find neigh- 
bors, co-workers, friends, and older family members using the site. 

What Facebook offers is a collection of user profile pages. Every user 
has his or own profile page, where they post their status updates, display 
their personal information, share photos and videos, and such. When you 
become a "friend" of a person, you get access to their profile page, and all 
that's on it. You have to ask people to be their friend; over time, you'll prob- 
ably assemble a rather large list of such friends. 



facebook 



Tom French 

Wall Info Photos 




Tom French Come one come all and bring all your friends! 

Homecoming Party! 

Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 7:00pm 
Bob's House 

^ March 7 at 4:44pm ■ Comment ■ Like ■ Share 



C^ Filters 




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Chat with Tom 
:■.-:. .-. -.-■;.■ 



Suggest Friends for Tom 
Tom's progress: 



a fictitious character 



Information 
Relationship Status: 



Lew Archer Hey Torn, how's the project going? 
March 7 at 3:49pm ■ Comment ■ Like ■ 5ee Wall-to -Wall 



Tom French I'm okay with most things, hut you nevsr really know. 
March7at3:35pm ■ Comment ■ Like 



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Michael Miller Video Profile 

www, voutijhe.com 

Video profile of author Michael Miller, aired o 

Channel 3 Daybreak morning show. 



F -'.s WISH-TV 



| March 2 at 4: 30pm ■ Comment Like ■ Share 



Figure 1.1. A typical Facebook personal profile page. 



Facebook also offers profile pages for groups. A group can be a charitable 
organization, a company, or just an online club revolving around a specific 
topic. Facebook has groups for cat lovers, chess players, gardeners, and 
the like. There are also groups (more like fan clubs) for musicians, comedi- 
ans, actors, television shows, movies, and the like. As with personal profile 
pages, these group pages feature news about the topic at hand, photos, dis- 
cussions, and such. 



14 



CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 




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Figure 1.2. /\ Facebook group page. 

News— called status updates— from your friends and the groups you join are 
displayed in a constantly flowing news feed that appears on your Facebook 
home page. Everything that everybody's doing is listed there; it's how you 
keep track of all you deem important. 

As you'll learn in the next chapter, to use Facebook you have to join the 
site— become a member, as it were. Facebook membership and use is 
totally free; all you have to spend is your time. 

Things You Can — and Can't— Do on 
Facebook 

Okay, so Facebook is the most popular social network. What does that 
mean to you— and what can you use it for? 



Things to Do 

First off, you can use Facebook to let your friends and family know what 
you're up to. You do this in the form of status updates, short text messages 



Things You Can— and Can't— Do on Facebook 



15 



that appear on both your home page and in the news feed that is displayed 
on your friends' home pages. It's easy to log on and post a short status 
update; you can even do it from your cell phone! 

Next, you can use Facebook to view all your friends' status updates. As pre- 
viously noted, all these updates are consolidated into a single news feed on 
your Facebook home page. Just open the www.facebook.com page, log in, 
and get updated on what all your friends are doing. 



facebook 



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Figure 1 .3. The news feed on Facebook's home page— lots and lots of status 
updates from all your friends. 



You can also use Facebook to communicate privately with individual friends. 
Facebook offers a built-in email system for private messages, as well as 
real-time instant messaging (Facebook calls it "chat") with online friends. So 
not everything you do has to be public. 

That said, you can also use Facebook to share photos and videos. Just 
upload the files you want to share and they're displayed on a tab on your 
profile page. New photos and videos you upload are also displayed as status 
updates, so your friends receive notice of them in their news feeds. 

Facebook also offers a way to announce and track important events, such 
as parties and gatherings, as well as invite your friends to these events. Of 
course, you can join any group you find interesting on the site, as well as 
play games, buy and sell merchandise, and do all sorts of other fun and 



16 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

marginally useful stuff. It's a fairly robust website, after all — a real commu- 
nity online. 



Michael Miller's Photos - Grandkids 

Michael's Profile 



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Added about 7 months ago ■ Comment Like 



Figure 1.4. A personal photo album, open for sharing on Facebook. 



Things Not to Do 

With all the things you can do on Facebook, what sorts of things shouldn't 
you do? That is, what sorts of things is Facebook just not that suited for? 

First off, you have to remember that communicating with people via 
Facebook is no substitute for face-to-face communication. Those short little 
status updates you make can't convey the same information as a longer let- 
ter, or the emotion of a telephone conversation. Facebook communication is, 
at best, a kind of shorthand. When you really want to discuss something in 
depth, you need to do it in person, not on Facebook. 

Then there's the whole issue of what constitutes a friend. A person you call 
a "friend" on Facebook might not be someone you'd even recognize if you 
ran into them in the grocery store. It's easy to deceive yourself into think- 
ing you're immensely popular because you have a long friends list, but 



Why Grown-Ups Use Facebook 1 7 

these folks aren't really friends; they're just people you broadcast to online. 
They're more like an audience than anything else. 

This leads to the issue of whether online social networking is an effective 
replacement for real-world communication. You may be "talking" to more 
so-called friends online, but you may actually be talking to fewer real friends 
in the real world. Physical relationships could suffer if you spend too much 
time communicating virtually on Facebook; it's a false sort of familiarity that 
results. 

And when you have hundreds of people on your Facebook friends list, how 
well do you really know any of them? It's possible if not likely that some 
of the people you call "friends" really aren't the people they present them- 
selves to be. For whatever reason, some people adopt different personas— 
including fake names and profile pictures— when they're online; it's possible 
that you're establishing relationships on Facebook that have no basis in 
reality— which could result in online stalking or worse. 

Bottom line, you shouldn't let Facebook replace your real-world friendships. 
It can supplement your friendships, make some general communication 
easier, and even help you renew old acquaintances, but it can never replace 
a good conversation with an old friend. That sort of connection is— and will 
always be— priceless. 



Why Grown-Ups Use Facebook 



Many people use social networks such as Facebook as a kind of container 
for all their online activities. I like to think of Facebook as an operating 
system. This is particularly the case with teenagers and college kids, who 
have Facebook open in their browsers all day long. They do almost every- 
thing from within Facebook— read status updates, send and receive emails, 
instant message with other users, share photos and videos, you name it. 
They never exit the site; it's as constant for them as is Windows. 

Older users, however, tend not to be as Facebook-centric as the young'uns 
are. I don't know of too many people my age who are on Facebook 24/7, 
like their kids. We might check into Facebook a few times a day, but it 
doesn't monopolize our lives. Or at least it shouldn't. 



18 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

Instead, grown-ups use Facebook on a more occasional basis to keep 
tabs on what friends and family members are up to. We tend not to be as 
addicted to Facebook as our kids are; we don't have to know what every- 
one is doing on a minute-by-minute basis. Instead, we can log in once or 
maybe twice a day and get the general drift of everyone's activities. That's 
enough information for most of us. 

Grown-ups also use Facebook to reconnect with people we haven't seen 
in a while. A long while, sometimes. Personally, I use Facebook to hook up 
with old friends from high school and college, and to reconnect with former 
colleagues and those I might want to work with again. I guarantee you'll find 
people on Facebook that you haven't thought about for a long time. (Which 
may not always be a good thing, I suppose...) 

Facebook is also a great place for family members— especially extended 
families— to keep abreast of comings and goings. It might take a lot of 
effort to write your cousins and aunts and uncles and nieces and nephews 
and stepchildren and in-laws and all the rest, but a single Facebook sta- 
tus update will do the job of multiple letters and emails. You can also use 
Facebook to share family photos with the rest of your family, which is tons 
easier than printing and mailing photos manually. 

Speaking of family members, Facebook is a great way to spy on your kids. 
I don't mean that in a bad way, of course (or do I?); I mean that Facebook 
lets you see what your children are up to without them actually having to 
have a conversation with you about it. All you have to do is add your kids 
to your friends list, and you'll see all their status updates in your Facebook 
news feed. (That's unless they adjust their privacy settings to exclude you 
from their most private thoughts, which if they're smart they'll do.) 

Of course, there are plenty of ways for adult users to waste time on 
Facebook, just as our kids do. I know a fair number of supposed grown- 
ups who get addicted to Farmville and Mafia Wars and other social games, 
and spend way too much time playing them. So useless Facebook activity 
isn't the sole province of the young; us oldsters can also spend hours doing 
essentially nothing useful online. 

Bottom line, grown-ups use Facebook for many of the same reasons as 
younger folks do, but in a smarter and less intrusive fashion. Or so we'd like 
to think, anyway. 



Social Networking Do's and Don'ts 19 

Social Networking Do's and Don'ts 

When it comes to using Facebook and other social networks, there are 
some general guidelines you should adhere to. These guidelines will help 
you better fit into the community— and protect yourself from any inherent 
dangers. 

Do These Things 

In general, a social network like Facebook requires your active participation. 
Logging in once a month won't do it; that's not near social enough. 

If you want to become a Facebook member in good standing, then, follow 
these tips: 

• Post frequently— but not too frequently. A social network is a commu- 
nity, and to be a member of that community you have to actively partici- 
pate in that community. If you wait too long between posts, people will 
forget that you're there. Conversely, if you post too frequently, that might 
be perceived as overbearing or annoying. The best frequency is some- 
where between once a week and a few times per day— for grown-ups, 
once every day or two is probably good. 

• Keep your posts short and sweet. People don't want or expect to read 
overly long musings on Facebook. Instead, they tend to graze, absorb- 
ing the gist of what's posted rather than reading entire missives. On a site 
like Facebook, that means keeping your posts to no more than a few sen- 
tences. If you want to pontificate in more detail, get yourself a blog. 

• Use proper spelling. While you don't have to use complete and proper 
grammar and punctuation (see the next tip), blatant misspellings can mark 
you as less informed than you might actually be. Take the time to spell 
things correctly; it's literally the least you can do. 

• Take shortcuts. While you should always use proper spelling, you don't 
have to use full sentences when posting to a social network. In fact, it's 
okay to use common abbreviations and acronyms, such as BTW (by the 
way) and LOL (laughing out loud). Casual is good. 

• Link to additional information. You don't always have space to provide a 
lot of background information in a status update. Instead, you can link to 
Web pages or blog posts that offer more details. 



20 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 

• Be discrete. Remember, Facebook status updates are public, for all to 
read. Post only that information that you'd want your friends (or spouse or 
employer or children) to read. 

• Be cautious. You don't have to be paranoid about it, but it helps to 
assume that there are some dangerous people out there. Don't do any- 
thing that would put you in harm's way. 

Don't Do These Things 

Building on that last tip, you should, in general, avoid posting personal infor- 
mation in any public forum, including Facebook. Here are some specific 
things you should avoid when using Facebook: 

• Don't accept every friend request you receive. You don't have to have a 
thousand friends. It's better to have a smaller number of true friends than a 
larger number of people you really don't know. 

• Don't post if you don't have anything interesting to say. Some of the 
most annoying people on Facebook are those that post their every action 
and movement. ("I just woke up." "I'm reading my mail." "I'm thinking 
about having lunch." "That coffee was delicious.") Post if there's some- 
thing interesting happening, but avoid posting just to be posting. Think 
about what you like to read about other people, and post in a similar fash- 
ion. 

• Don't assume that everyone online will agree with you. Some people 
use social networks like Facebook as a platform for their opinions. While it 
may be okay to share your opinions with close (i.e., non-Facebook) friends, 
spouting off in a public forum is not only bad form, it's a way to incite a 
flame war— an unnecessary online war of words. 

• Don't post anything that could possibly be used against you. Want to 
put your job in jeopardy? Then by all means, you should post negative 
comments about your workplace or employer. And future employment may 
be denied if a potential employer doesn't like what he or she sees in your 
Facebook posts. (And they will be looking...) As in most things, with social 
networking it's better to be safe than sorry; avoid posting overly negative 
comments that are better kept private. 

• Don't post overly personal information. Along the same lines, think twice 
before sharing the intimate details of your private life— including embar- 



Social Networking Do's and Don'ts 21 

rassing photographs. Discretion is a value us older folks should maintain; 
there's no reason for posting pictures of you falling down drunk at the 
holiday office party, or baring it all on the beach during your last vacation. 
Leave some of the details to imagination. 

• Don't gripe. Building on that last tip, the last thing I and lots of others 
want to find in our news feeds are your private gripes. Oh, it's okay to 
grouse and be grumpy from time to time, but don't use Facebook as your 
personal forum for petty grievances. If you have a personal problem, deal 
with it. You don't have to share everything, you know. Whining gets old 
really fast. 

• Don't post personal contact information. As nice as Facebook is for 
renewing old acquaintances, it can also put you in contact with people you 
really don't want to be in contact with. So don't make it easy for disrepu- 
table people or unwanted old boyfriends to find you offline; avoid posting 
your phone number, email address, and home address. 

• Don't post your constant whereabouts. You don't need to broadcast 
your every movement; thieves don't need to know when your house is 
empty. It's okay to post where you were after the fact, but keep your cur- 
rent whereabouts private. 

In other words, don't post every little detail and thought about everything 
you do. Keep your private life private. And make public only the most gen- 
eral information that those distant acquaintances you call Facebook friends 
want or need to know. 

Other Social Media 

Social networking is just one form of what the digerati call social media. 
(Who are these digerati, by the way?) Social media encompasses all 
websites, services, and platforms that people use to share experiences 
and opinions with each other. 

In practice, that covers everything from social networks like Facebook 
to social bookmarking services, where users share the sites and articles 
they like. It also includes blogs, microblogs, and other forms of online 
communities. 



22 CHAPTER 1 Welcome to Facebook: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore 



Okay, that's a lot of jargon to just throw out there, so I'll give you a bit 
of background. 

A social bookmarking service, like Digg or Delicious, lets users share 
their favorite Web pages with friends and colleagues online. When you 
join one of these social bookmarking services, you visit a website, Web 
page, news article, or blog post that you like, then click a button or link 
to bookmark that site. This bookmark then appears in your master list of 
bookmarks on the social bookmarking service site; you can share any or 
all bookmarks with anyone you like. 

A blog (short for "web log") is a shared online journal consisting of 
entries from the site's owner or creator. Bloggers create posts of vary- 
ing length; some posts are just a sentence or two, others several para- 
graphs long; blog posts can include text, photos, and videos. Most 
blogs are focused on a specific topic, and some are almost journalistic 
in their execution. (Others read like personal diaries, so there's a bit of 
variety out there.) 

A microblogging service essentially separates the status updates from 
everything else offered on a social network. Microblogs exist solely to 
distribute short text posts from individual users to groups of follow- 
ers. These posts are similar to traditional blog posts but much shorter. 
The most popular microblogging service is Twitter, which lets you 
make posts (called tweets) of 140 characters or less— but that's all. No 
groups, no communities, no nothing else, just tweets. 

Then we come to social networks, which offer pretty much everything 
you find in other social media, but all in one site. So while you can keep 
a separate blog, create social bookmarks, and microblog to your heart's 
content on Twitter, if you want to do it all in one place, a general social 
networking site, like Facebook, is the better deal. 



Chapter- J 



Signing Up and Getting 
Started 



If you've gotten this far in the book I assume you think 
Facebook sounds like a pretty good deal. Now you just have 
to sign up to start using the site. What does that entail? 



Before You Sign Up 



Here are two nice things about using Facebook: It's easy 
and it's free. That's right, even though you have to create an 
account, it's a free account; you never pay Facebook any- 
thing to use the site. That's because Facebook, like most 
websites these days, is totally advertiser supported. So you'll 
see some ads after you get on the site, but won't be out a 
single penny. 

What do you need to sign up? Not much, really. You need a 
working email address, a first and last name, and a birthdate. 
You'll also need to know your gender (I hope you already do) 
and come up with some sort of password you want to use. 
That's about it, really. Pretty simple. 

Now, after you create your account, Facebook will prompt 
you to enter all sorts of personal information. This includes 
everything from your street address and phone number to 
which books and movies you like. Fortunately, none of this 
info is mandatory; you don't have to enter any of this if you 
don't want to. (In fact, I recommend you don't enter a lot of 
the overly personal information; it's best not to publicize your 
contact information, for example.) 



24 



CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 



So you don't need to do a lot of prep work before you sign up. Assuming 
that you have a name and an email address, you're now ready to go. 



Creating a Facebook Account 



As I said, just about anyone can create a free Facebook account. All you 
have to do is follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook home page at www.facebook.com, shown in Figure 
2.1. 




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Figure 2.1 . Getting ready to create a new account from the Facebook home page. 



2. Enter your first name into the First Name 
box. 



L^Nute 



3. Enter your last name into the Last Name 
box. 



You'll use your email 
address to sign into 
Facebook each time you 
4. Enter your email address into the Your Email en t e r the site, 
box. 



5. Enter your desired password into the New 

Password box. Your password should be at least six characters long. 



Find Friends and Complete Your Profile 



25 



6. Select your gender from the I Am (Select 
Sex) list. 

7. Select your date of birth from the Birthday 
(Month/Day/Year) list. 

8. Click the Sign Up button. 

9. When prompted to complete the Security 
Check page, enter the "secret words" from 
the captcha into the Text in the Box box, 
then click the Sign Up button on this page. 

10. When you receive an email message asking 
you to confirm your new Facebook account, 
click the link in this email. 

That's it— you now have a Facebook account. 
But Facebook isn't done with you quite yet. 
Read on to learn more. 

Find Friends and Complete 
Your Profile 

When you confirm your new Facebook 
account, Facebook prompts you to find friends 
and family who are already on Facebook. 
You're also prompted to add more information 
to your Facebook profile. 

Now, you don't have to do any of these things; 
you can skip any or all of these next steps, 
by clicking the Skip or Skip This Step link on 
any given page. But if you have a few free 
moments, you might as well get this stuff out 
of the way. 

Here's how it works: 

1. The first page you see is shown in Figure 
2.2. This page suggests one or more people 



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To make your password 
more secure (harder for 
someone else to guess, that 
is), include a mix of alpha- 
betic, numeric, and special 
characters (punctuation 
marks). Longer passwords 
are also more secure. 



[> 



Note 



A captcha is a type of 
challenge-response test to 
ensure that you're actually a 
human being, rather than a 
computer program. You've 
seen lots of these things 
on the Web already; they 
typically consist of warped 
or otherwise distorted text 
that cannot be read by a 
machine or software pro- 
gram. Websites use capt- 
chas to cut down on the 
amount of computer-gener- 
ated spam they receive. 



L^Note 

Learn more about the friend- 
finding process in Chapter 4, 
"How to Find Old Friends- 
and Make New Ones." 






26 



CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 



you might want to be friends with. Click the Add Friend button next to add 
that person as a friend and then click Continue, or just click the Skip link 
to move to the next step. 



Step 3 

Profile Information 



Step 4 

Profile Picture 



Add Friends 



Jason Guan is someone you may know 
Ignore 



Figure 2.2. Viewing Facebook's friend suggestions. 



Next, Facebook lets you find friends who are in your web-based email con- 
tact list who are also Facebook members, as shown in Figure 2.3. Enter 
the email address and password for your email account into the Your Email 
and Email Password boxes, then click the Find Friends button. 



Stepl 

Add Friends 



Step 3 

Profile Information 



Step 4 

Profile Picture 



Are your friends already on Facebook? 

Many of your friends may already be here, Searching your email account is the fastest way 
to find your friends on Facebook. 



Your Email: 
Email Password: 



A Facebook will not store your password , Learn More . 



Skip this step 



Figure 2.3. Searching for email contacts to add as friends. 



3. Facebook lists people in your email contacts list who are also members of 
Facebook. To add one or more of these people to your Facebook friends 
list, check the box next to that person's name and then click the Add 
Friend or Add as Friends button. If you do not want to add any of these 
people, click Skip. 



Find Friends and Complete Your Profile 



27 






ote 



Step 2 is for web-based 
email only, such as Hotmail, 
Gmail, or Yahoo! Mail. 



4. Next, Facebook displays a list of your 
email contacts who are not yet members of 
Facebook. To invite any of these people to 
join Facebook, check the box next to that 
person's name and then click the Invite to 
Join button. 

5. Facebook now displays the Step 3: Profile 
Information page, shown in Figure 2.4. This is where you start filling in 
your personal information to be displayed in your Facebook profile. If you 
want to do this, start by typing the name of your high school into the High 
School box, then select the year of your graduation from the Class Year 
list. 



Step 1 Step 1 

Add Friends Find Friends 



Step 4 

Profile Picture 



Fill out your Profile Info 

This information will help you find your friends on Facebook. 



High School: 

College/ University; 

Em plover 



sup i^ULuli 



Figure 2.4. Entering school and work information. 

6. If you graduated from or are attending a 
college or university, type the name of your 
college into the College/University box and 
select the year of your graduation from the 
Class Year list. 

7. If you are currently employed, type the name 
of your employer into the Company box. 

8. Click the Save & Continue button. 

9. If you entered any school or work informa- 
tion, you will be prompted to add as friends 



rl&Tip" 



As you type into many 
boxes in the Facebook 
site, items that match what 
you're typing automatically 
appear in a list beneath the 
box. You can select the 
appropriate item from the 
list, if it's listed there, or just 
finish typing the complete 
name. 



28 



CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 



people you might know from those schools or businesses. (Facebook is a 
bear about adding friends.) If you so wish, click the names of any people you 
know and want as friends, then click the Save & Continue button. 

10. Facebook now displays the Step 4: Profile Picture page, shown in Figure 
2.5, where you're be prompted to set your Profile picture. Assuming you 
want to do this now, and that you want to use an existing photo stored on 
your computer, click the Upload a Photo link. 



Step 1 

Add Friends 



Step 2 Step 3 

Find Friends Profile Information 



Sety 


Dur profile picture 


Upload a Photo 

From your computer 


Take a Photo 

With your webcam 


<Back 











Figure 2.5. Getting ready to add your picture to your Facebook profile. 



11. When the Upload Your Profile Picture win- 
dow appears, click the Choose File button. 

12. When the Open dialog box appears, navi- 
gate to and select the photo you wish to 
use. Then click the Open button. 

13. When your picture appears on the page, 
click the Save & Continue button. 

That's it, finally. You're now taken to a special 
Welcome page on the Facebook site, where 
you can start filling in your profile information. 



[> 



Note 



If your computer has a web- 
cam built in or connected, 
you can use your webcam 
to shoot a new photo for 
your Facebook Profile. From 
the Step 4: Profile Picture 
page, click the Take a Photo 
link. When the Take a Profile 
Picture window appears, 
smile and click the camera 
icon. After the countdown 
has been completed, click 
the Save Picture button. 



Filling Out Your Profile 



29 



Filling Out Your Profile 



The next thing you want to do is fill out the 
personal information that will appear in your 
Facebook profile. There's a lot about yourself 
you can enter, although most of it is optional - 
so you don't have to divulge too much, if you 
don't want. 



I " "^ 

L^Note 



You can upload pictures in 
the JPG, GIF, or PNG for 
mats, up to 4MB in size. 






You start this process on the Facebook Welcome page that was displayed 
at the end of the sign-up process, as shown in Figure 2.6. (You can redis- 
play this page by going to the Home page and clicking Welcome in the side- 
bar.) Just follow these steps: 



facebook 




H^^^E Dinah Lance 
JflU Edit My Profile 

H Welcome 
fi~l Mews Feed 
[JJ Mcbgbm 

™ : ■ - " 
: i ltotn. 
j£, l-nends 

P$ Apokfl&ons 

Ham 

Fririicl\ Oulun" 


H Welcome to Facebook, Dinah. 


1 Hi out your profile Information 

Help your friends And you by fling out rare bode proHe nnynutnn. 




f tditFTsHe 




H Activate your mobile phone 


■ lie cove texts ivdi ycor friends btoAa 
Updates end Messages natzntiy. 

■ Update yixji Stalin mwi Hcuroye Trjcndv 

LETIOSHb. I 


► 


■ 


Ftegfcter tor Facetocfc Text Messages 
MuhmKi fifnniifl* inmftiiiiMnn rntnT 




71 Find pyu^k: yuu know 

Sf-jwffi hjr nnmp of Inok foe dnuiwlin wkJ ruwnrtm. 
Fntrr nnnmr nrrmnJ ■*■ 





Figure 2.6. Getting ready to enter profile information from the Welcome page. 



1. From the Welcome page, click the Edit Profile button. 

2. When the Basic Information page appears, as shown in Figure 2.7, enter 
where you live into the Current City box. 

3. Enter the place you grew up into the Hometown box. 

4. Look at the Sex list and make sure it has the correct gender selected. If 
not, pull down the list and select your gender. If you prefer not to display 
your gender in your profile, uncheck the Show My Sex in My Profile option. 



30 



CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 



\i 1 Basic Information 

[j±] Profile Picture 
[Tp Relationships 
|jg Likes and Interests 
B Education and Work 
^51 Contact Information 



Visit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
information on your profile. 



Dinah Lance 



4 View Hv Profile 



Current City: 
Horn e t o w n : 



Sqg Female [V] 



F71 Show my sex In my profile 



Birthday Dec Q 17 Q 1975 [7] Show my full birthday in my profile , Q 



Interested In: Q Women 

□ Men 

Looking For EH Friendship 
[T] Dating 
I I A Relationship 

□ Networking 



Political Views 
Religious Views: 



Figure 2.7. Entering basic profile information. 

5. Confirm that the birthday listed is correct, 
or make any necessary adjustments. If you 
prefer not to display your birthday in your 
profile (if you're a little vain, perhaps), pull 
down the adjoining list and select Don't 
Show My Birthday in My Profile. 

6. If you're so inclined, select which gender in 
which you're interested (Men or Women) in 
the Interested In section. 



rGfTirl 



A 



If you want your friends 
to be reminded of your 
birthday, but not necessar- 
ily know how old you are, 
select Show Only Month & 
Day in My Profile. 



7. In the Looking For section, check which activities you're looking for: 
Friendship, Dating, A Relationship, or Networking. (Remember, you don't 
have to select any of these.) 

8. Enter your political views (or the party you support) into the Political Views 
box. 



9. Enter your religious views or affiliation into the Religious Views box. 



Filling Out Your Profile 



31 



10. Enter a short biography (a few sentences long) into the Bio box. 

11. If you have any favorite quotations, enter them into the Quotations box. 

12. Click the Save Changes button. 

This gives you a good start on completing your profile— but you're not done 
yet. To access other parts of your profile, click one of the other links in the 
sidebar on the Welcome page. These links include: 

• Profile Picture, shown in Figure 2.8, to add or change the picture that 
appears on your Profile page 

• Relationships, shown in Figure 2.9, where you can define your current 
relationship status (single, married, in a relationship, it's complicated, and 
such) and enter the names of selected family members. 

• Likes and Interests, shown in Figure 2.10, where you can add your favorite 
activities, interests, music, books, movies, and television shows. 

• Education and Work, shown in Figure 2.1 1 , where you can edit your cur- 
rent school and employer info, as well as enter past employers. 

• Contact Information, shown in Figure 2.12, where you can edit or add 
additional contact information — email address, IM screen name, mobile or 
land phone, street address, and website URL. 



IS) Basic Information 


Dinah Lance 


i View My Profile | 


| 3| Profile Picture 




Br9l 

Edit Thumbnail 


Select an image file on your computer [*10 mas): 


\ip Relationships 
-&r- Likes and Interests 
■ Education and Work 
df^ Contact Information 


Visit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
information on your profile, 


1 ^ 
■ 






| tl Take a Picture | 

= _■- = :-:=-= -. :=t ; :-~ . -_ - = ■-'"-=- :-"-: : =-■ 3_~ :- = -—_"=-: ~~ z "•=; 

pot violate the Terms of Service. 



Figure 2.8. Editing your profile photo. 



32 CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 



S Basic Information 
[J±] Profile Picture 


Dinah Lance 




|fp Relationships 


Relationship Status In a Relationship \^\ with 


-^ Likes and Interests 
A Education and Work 
ij5] Contact Information 

Visit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
information on your profile. 


1 


L ! 




Family Member 


Select Relation: |T| 

Remove 


Add another family member 







Figure 2.9. Entering relationship and family information. 



Ill Basic mfarrnatran 
[§] Profile Picture 
jYp RrtarinrrtiirK 










Dinah Lance 


* View My Profile 












I^H^ Underwater basket 
Tl^.. weaving 




tafiwfllcx 


WiwLdu yuufcke Lu Ju? 


■£ tikes and Interests 




H Education ard Work 
rfl] f 'mi tart Tntnrmatimi 

Visit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
Information on your profile. 


Underwater basket vieavng; 








Interests: 




Digital photography 






ES^tzJ Fhotography 










V^| Nlkkl ranofsky 


Muck? 


Wrwtmira-rinyn. kP> 




Hkki Yanffftky 

See more [1) 






maxE^*- Motorcycle 


Books: 


tthat books do you ike? 


| TneHouse And the Moturcyde 










B Batman: The Dark Knight 


Movies: 


what moves do you &c? 




Batman; The Dak Krwjil 



Figure 2.1 0. Entering your likes and interests. 



Filling Out Your Profile 33 



Ell Basic Information 
\f±\ Profile Picture 
[■p Relationships 
[JF Likes and Interests 


Dinah Lance 




High School: La Jolla Country Day School 


X 


| 1933 B\ 








U Edu:3t»:n and Work 


Add Another High School 




ijjffl Contact Information 

Visit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
information on your profile. 




College/University: H Boston University 


X 


1983 H 


Con cent fa I i o n % 
Attended for 








^p Business Management 


* 


1 








1 




® College 

O Graduate School 




Add Another School 










Em ployer: _ Young Life 


* 


Position: 
City/Town: 






_^ Fundraiser 


* 










Description: 


* 


Time Period: 


lJ 1 currently work here. 





Figure 2.1 1. Editing school and work information. 



El] Basic Information 
[J±] Profile Picture 
(fp Relationships 
L dr' Likes and Interests 
A Education and Work 


Dinah Lance 


Emails: _ i3molehillgroup.com 






Add / Remove Emails 






c{S| Contact Information 








"MTsit your privacy settings to 
control who can see the 
information on your profile. 


IM Screen Name(s): AIM 


SI 




Add another screen name 












Mobile Phone: United States (+1) 
Land Phone: United States (+1) 


-H| 
















Address: 












City/Town: 






Neig h borhood: 






ape Q 












Website: 


* 























Figure 2.12. Entering contact information. 



You don't have to enter all 



34 CHAPTER 2 Signing Up and Getting Started 

Remember, all of this information is optional. [+++*» 

You don't have to— and probably don't want /^^|\| fitP 

to— enter any specific item. It's up to you how 

much of yourself you share with others on the 

,- . . your profile information at 

Facebook site. :, . x . 

this time. You can go back 

at any time and enter more 

information, or change 

the information you've 

already added. Learn more 

in Chapter 22, "Managing 

Your Facebook Account." 

Creating Multiple Facebook Accounts 

Here's something you probably didn't know you could do. For whatever 
reason you might have (and there are a few), you can actually create 
multiple Facebook accounts. All you need is multiple email addresses. 

You see, Facebook bases each individual account on a unique email 
address. If you have more than one email address (and most of us do), 
you can create one Facebook account for each address. So, for exam- 
ple, if you have both work and home email addresses, you can create 
Facebook accounts for each. 

(Technically, creating multiple accounts is a violation of Facebook's 
terms of service, but how are they supposed to know? I say go for it if 
you want; even if you get caught, you can always establish yet another 
account with another email address.) 

Why might you want to create more than one Facebook account? It 
all has to do with having multiple identities online. For example, you 
might want to create both a personal and a professional persona on the 
Facebook site, so you can post your personal musings under one ID 
and your more professional thoughts under another. Or you might want 
to create a completely fictitious persona to track the online activities of 
your children. (More about that in Chapter 6, "Keeping Tabs on Your 
Kids.") Or, if you're really creepy, you can just create multiple identities 
to play around with. Whatever floats your boat. 



Filling Out Your Profile 35 



In any case, as long as you have distinct email addresses, there's no 
rule against creating multiple Facebook accounts. So have at it, if you 
wish. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Cttapter- ■€ 



Getting Around the 
Facebook Site 



After you've signed up for Facebook, it's time to get to know 
the Facebook site. There's a lot there, if you know where to 
find it— which is what we discuss in this chapter. 



What's What and What's Where on 
Facebook 

When it comes to getting around the Facebook site, where 
do you start? Well, the logical place to start is the sign in 
page, and then what you see afterward — Facebook's home 
page. 



Signing In 

Point your Web browser to www 
the Facebook sign in page, 
shown in Figure 3.1. (This is 
also the page you used to 
register for Facebook, in case 
you forgot.) Signing in is as 
easy as entering your email 
address and password into the 
two boxes in the top right of 
the page and then clicking the 
Login button. 



facebook.com and you see 



r&TirJ 



A 



V 



If you don't want to be 
prompted to enter your 
login information every time 
you access the site, check 
the Keep Me Logged In 
option. 



38 



CHAPTER 3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 



Enter your password 




Check to stay logged in 

I J Pa 




Heading out? Stay connected 

Vist fecebook.com on your mobile phone. 



Get Facebook Mobile 



Click to log in 



Sign Up 

It's free and anyone can join 




First Name: 

Last Name: 

Your Email: 

New Password: 



lam: Select Sex: |T| 
Birthday: Month: |V| Day: |T| Year: H 

Why do I need to provide this? 

Creates Page for a celebrity, band or business. 



Figure 3.1 . Signing into Facebook— enter your email address and password. 



Welcome to the Home Page 

After you've signed in, Facebook drops you right onto the Home page. This 
is as good a place as any to start your exploration of the Facebook site. It's 
also where you keep up-to-date on what your friends are up to. 

As you can see in Figure 3.2, the Home page consists of three columns, a 
big one in the middle and two smaller ones on either side. We'll focus our 
attention on the center column first, which contains something called the 
News Feed. 

The News Feed is, in essence, a scrolling list of status updates from your 
Facebook friends. The most recent updates are on the top, with older 
updates scrolling to the bottom and then off the page. (To view even older 
updates, click the Older Posts link at the bottom of the page.) 

By default, the News Feed displays only those status updates from friends 
that Facebook thinks are most important to you. Don't ask me how 
Facebook determines this, as they don't always get it right; that is, the 
default News Feed — dubbed Top News— often excludes posts from people 
you do want to read about. 



What's What and What's Where on Facebook 



39 



Useful navigation column 
I 



News Feed 



facebook 



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tatMyETer* 



C Welcome 
f ! «*wsF« 

™ tvC" L3 
@ IT»EK 
ill l-nends 

1* I' -,■.-!-■. 



Fairly useless right-hand column 
Click to display posts 
from all your friends Facebook toolbar 




O News heed 


Tuff Iknro - Mail Rutunl 


What's on your mind? 


□ 


Mirhapl Mk-harrk L iked the 1 any Awards In-st ni^hE! 


^. 


Mirh-npl MUpr Two-yenr old Hnytey wnn un nil night wjth had 
■drpnms... Itapp she depps heifer tantghl 
53 mmies sod ' Comment Ufce 


ft 


Tom French arided Yodelinq to Ms acfcvrties. 

;^ nliMil m Inn ^ja 


3? 


Mfcjhkftul Miler Ry-ruturdmy ffor d bo Lit (Jim fourth Lirri*} Hie Pitvaiy 
Settings lesson for my Face-boat Essentials video. Please, FB r don't 
change anything else! 
icsleroayal '.'.': ^/Sir. tommcn t ' lAe 




U Rogrrl^bi^^rouHdLtiMthfhnh.rTI vi-fntkiituvv' 
P^PJ the» pitvar-Tf pokey tri a v.-retJy tus. 




.-.' irn ■-■■- miL 



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Ufc= Sec W J-lo-Wd 



Wayne H Howard 
^3 Add -as fttcrtd 



BdiWaLeirKMid! 
iH Add =, Trwd 



| FV*HX-r 
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, Like 



ftp VJiw't on FMeboolC 

hnd your fhendj 
CJ Wins nut cri Fsuiiuufc? 



Figure 3.2. The Facebook Home page— complete with News Feed of your friends' 
status updates. 



Fortunately, you can display updates from all your friends instead of just 
these so-called top posts. All you have to do is click the Most Recent link at 
the top of the News Feed column, and everybody gets his or her say. 

The right column of the Home page contains, to be honest, mostly use- 
less information. Here is where Facebook places its advertisements (in the 
"Sponsored" section), suggestions for things you might like to do or people 
you might like to add to your friends list, notice of pending friend requests, 
upcoming friends' birthdays, and the like. Myself, I could do without this 
entire column, but there it is and there's not much you can do about it. 

The left column of the Home page, however, is a lot more useful. This is one 
of your primary navigation aids to content on the Facebook site. Click a link 
here and you either display different information on the Home page (in place 
of the News Feed) or navigate to a different section of the site. 



40 



CHAPTER 3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 



What do you find in the navigation column? 
Here's the list: 

• Welcome: This handy page is for new 
users that helps you enter profile informa- 
tion, find new friends, and the like. 

• News Feed: This is the default view on the 
Home page and where you view all your 
friends' status updates. 

• Messages: All the private messages (also 
known as email) you've received from other 
Facebook members are displayed in this 
area. It's also the place you go to send new 
emails to other users. 

• Events: This area displays any Facebook 
events you've signed up for, as well as 
upcoming birthdays of your Facebook 
friends. You can also click here to create 
new events. 

• Photos: You can find the most recent pho- 
tos and (with another click) videos posted 
by your friends. 

• Friends: This area is where you go to find 
new friends on the Facebook site. 

• Applications: All the applications you and 
your friends are using are displayed in this 
area. These are little widget-like utilities that 
add more functionality to the Facebook site. 

• Games: All the social games you and your 
friends are playing on Facebook are listed 
in this area. 

• Ads and pages: From this area, which dis- 
plays the Facebook Advertising page, you 
can create a Facebook ad (nice if you want 
to promote a business) or fan page. 



Q 



Note 



Learn more about 
Facebook's built-in email 
in Chapter 9, "Exchanging 
Private Messages." 



-> 



Q 



Note 



Learn more about 
Facebook events in 
Chapter 13, "Sharing 
Birthdays and Events." 



y 






ote 



Learn more about find- 
ing Facebook friends in 
Chapter 4, "How to Find 
Old Friends— and Make 
New Ones." 









ote 



Learn more about 
Facebook applications 
and games in Chapter 18, 
"Finding Fun Games and 
Applications." 



What's What and What's Where on Facebook 



41 



Groups: This area is displayed if you've 
joined a topic-oriented group and it lists 
all the topic-oriented groups to which you 
subscribe— and lets you create your own 
groups. 

Friends Online: This area is simply a list of 
all your Facebook friends who are currently 
online and logged into the site. Click a 
friend's name to start an instant messaging- 
like chat with that person. 



I " "\ 

L^Note 

Learn more about fan 
pages in Chapter 15, 
"Becoming a Fan." 

L^Note 



Learn more about 
Facebook groups in 
Chapter 16, "Meeting 
Others in Groups." 



And that, in a nutshell, is the Facebook Home 

page. It's more than just a gateway into the 

Facebook site; it's where you go to keep 

informed of your friend's activities. As such, 

it's the one page that most users always go to. 

I'd recommend bookmarking this page (which 

resides at www.facebook.com — after you've logged in, that is) in your Web 

browser. 



Profile Pages 

Past the Home page, most other important pages on the Facebook site are 

individual users' Profile pages. A Profile page, 

like the one shown in Figure 3.3, is where each 

user's status updates are listed, along with 

that person's personal information, uploaded 

photos and videos, upcoming events, and the 

like. 



L^Note 



In essence, a Profile page is that person's 
home on the Facebook site. You have your 
own Profile page, of course, as does everyone 
else who's a Facebook member. You go to a 
friend's Profile page to learn more about that 
person, or to view his or her information, pho- 
tos, and such. 



Learn more about view- 
ing a friend's Profile page 
in Chapter 5, "Visiting 
Friends and Family on 
Facebook." Learn more 
about customizing your 
own Profile page in 
Chapter 14, "Personalizing 
Your Profile Page." 



42 



CHAPTER 3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 




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leu's pf Dffcss: 



arthdav: 



I p.vj Arrhrr 

Wal infn Ptinrn-; Vidro E'nks Ivpnri » 



Write something... 



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RECENT ACT IVIT* 

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IP Lew wrote on Ton Trench's Wol. 

4jJ, Lew aid Twn Fi rrnJi ■e now friends. Ce^^i^ e ■ i 

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Lew Archer Looking forward to a lazy Sunday afternoon. 
1 Niarch 7 *t 2:4iprri ■ corrment ■ Lke 



Lew Archer hey, I'm on Facebook nowl 



2 hiends n eemmon See Al 

Ktetucl Toil FV-endi Sob Mfcr 
Micr 





I 



Q^Hters 






"1 



Figure 3.3. A typical Facebook Profile page. 



Navigating the Facebook Toolbar 



As we just discussed, you can access many parts of the Facebook site 
from the navigation sidebar on the Facebook Home page. The other primary 
means of navigating the Facebook site is via the Facebook toolbar, shown 
in Figure 3.4, that you find at the top of every Facebook page. It's a key way 
to get around the site. 



Click to read private messages 



Click to go to 

the Home page 

I 



facebook 



Click to review 
friend requests 



Enter search terms here 



Also click to go to 
the Home page ' 



Click to find 
' new friends 



Click to view 
notifications 



Click to initiate 
search 




Click to go to your 
own Profile page 



Click to configure 
account options 



Figure 3.4. The Facebook toolbar. 



Navigating the Facebook Toolbar 43 

What can you do from the Facebook toolbar? Here's a list, from left to right: 

• Click the Facebook logo to go to the Facebook Home page, complete with 
News Feed. 

• View any friend requests you've received. If you have any pending friend 
requests, you'll see a red number— for the number of requests— on top of 
the icon. Click the icon to view a drop-down list of these requests. 

• View your most recent private messages. As with the friend requests icon, 
a red number on top displays if you have unread messages. Click the icon 
to view a drop-down list of messages. 

• View notifications from Facebook, such as someone commenting on your 
status or accepting your friend request. Click the icon to view the most 
recent notifications. 

• Search the Facebook site for people and things. Just enter your query into 
the Search box and then either click the Search (magnifying glass) button 
or press Enter on your computer keyboard. (More on searching in just a 
sec.) 

• Another way to go home, by clicking the Home button on the right side 
of the toolbar. (Yes, this does exactly the same thing as clicking the 
Facebook logo; this button was requested by Facebook's Department of 
Redundancy Department.) 

• Display your Profile page by clicking the Profile button. 



L^Note 



Click the Find Friends button (not displayed 
on all accounts) to add new people to your 

Facebook Friends list. 

Learn more about 

Access all sorts of account settings, includ- Faceb0 ok's privacy set- 

ing important privacy settings, by clicking tings in chapter 21 , 

the Account button and then selecting an "Keeping Some Things 

option from the drop-down menu. Options Private." Learn more 

are Edit Friends, Account Settings, Privacy about Facebook's account 

Settings, Application Settings, Help Center, settings in Chapter 22, 

and Logout. (If you use Facebook's built-in "Managing Your Facebook 

currency to buy anything on the site, there Accounts 
may also be a Credits Balance option.) 






44 



CHAPTER 3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 



As I said, the Facebook toolbar appears at the top of each and every 
Facebook page. I use it primarily to jump back and forth between my Home 
and Profile pages. It's also useful to access your private email messages 
and to search the site— and of course, to access your privacy settings. 



Searching Facebook 



Let's talk a bit about searching Facebook. The Search box found in the 
Facebook toolbar can be used to search for virtually anything on the 
Facebook site. 

That's right, Facebook uses a single Search box to search for all types of 
items. You can't fine-tune the search from the Search box; instead, you 
fine-tune the results when the results page appears. 

How does it work, then? Well, all you have to do is enter your query into the 
Search box. As you type, a list of items that match your query are displayed 
in a drop down menu under the box, as shown in Figure 3.5. 



E 



happy feet 



? 



Happy Feet 

Movie 

13S.391 p&=.-.* >'=--?. 

HAPPY FEET enterprise 

Product/Service 



Happy Feet 

j Game 

I 2EZ :^::-^ -t" e. 

Happy Feet 

Album 



See More Results for happy feet t 

C=: = :":: - F ■: . 



i flLeuuup, im i iul saa c job 



Figure 3.5. A list of suggestions appears as you enter a search query. 



If what you want is displayed in this list, great; click the item and go there. 
Otherwise, keep typing and then press Enter or click the Search button. 

Facebook now displays a search results page, like the one shown in Figure 
3.6. By default, all items that match your query are displayed — people, 
groups, pages, events, you name it. You can, however, narrow down the 
results by type of item. Just click the type of item in the left column, and the 
search results of that type are displayed. 



Searching Facebook 45 









193 Results 


ralph Emerson 

^ People 


1 £j| Pages 


1 Name: 


Ralph Waldo Emerson 

Page 

12,678 people like this. 


Like 


,| Pages 
\l±\ Groups 
d^p Applications 


E3 


[3^ Events 




Web Results 
[ITH Posts by Friends 
[10 Posts by Everyone 


ifl 


■ Name: 




Emerson, Ralph Waldo 

Writer 

4,363 people like this. 


Like 


jj^, People 




View All Pag e Resu Its ► 

377 Results 


Name: 

■ 


Ralph Emerson 


Add as Friend 
Send a Message 



Figure 3.6. A typical search results page. 



For example, if you want to display only people that match your query (that 
is, if you're searching for a person), click People in the left column. If you 
want to display Facebook groups, click Groups. In this fashion, then, you 
can search for: 

• People: You can then choose to visit a person's Profile page (by clicking 
their name on the search results page), add that person as a friend (Add as 
Friend), or send that person a private email message (Send a Message). 

• Pages, or what I like to call "fan pages": You can then visit a given page 
(by clicking the page's name in the search results), or choose to become a 
fan of that page (by clicking the Like link). 

• Groups: You can then visit a given group page (by clicking the group's 
name in the search results), or choose to become a member of that group 
(by clicking the Join Group or Request to Join links). 

• Applications: You can visit that application's Facebook page, and from 
there join the group, by clicking the View Application link. 



46 CHAPTER 3 Getting Around the Facebook Site 

• Events: You can then then visit an event's page (by clicking the event 
name in the search results), view people attending that event (by clicking 
the Confirmed Guests link), or indicate whether or not you're attending the 
event (by clicking the RSVP link). 

• Web results: That's right, these are Web pages that match your query, as 
determined by Microsoft's Bing search engine. Click a link in the results to 
view that Web page. 

• Posts by Friends: This search displays your friends' status updates that 
match your query. 

• Posts by Everyone: To see all the status updates on Facebook that match 
your query— friends and otherwise— use this search. 

Of course, to display all these items at once, click View All Page Results. 



Signing Off 



When you're done using Facebook and want to sign off from the site, all you 
have to do is click the Account button on the Facebook toolbar and then 
click Logout. When you do this, you then have to log back in the next time 
you visit www.facebook.com. 

You don't have to sign off, however. If you just navigate to a different web- 
site, and you checked the Keep Me Logged In option when you last signed 
on, you'll display the Facebook Home page when you next visit www. face- 
book. com. It's your choice. 



Getting Help 



There's one option on the Facebook toolbar we kind of glossed over. 
That's the Help Center option you see when you click the Account but- 
ton. (You can also access the Help Center by scrolling to the bottom of 
any Facebook page and clicking the Help link.) 

The Facebook Help Center is your gateway to information about every 
Facebook feature. There are guides to Using Facebook, Facebook 
Applications and Features, and Ads and Business solutions. Click the 
links in the Help Center sidebar to view guides to Games and Apps, 
Help Discussions, Getting Started, and Safety. 



Signing Off 47 



Even more useful, if you have a question about using Facebook, just 
enter it into the Search box on the Help Center page. This will display 
a list of FAQs (articles) and discussions that have something to do with 
what you're asking about. 

And about these Help Discussions. These are questions asked by other 
users, answered by members of the Facebook community. I find these 
useful if "official" information about a given topic doesn't exist, or is 
less than helpful. Just click the Help Discussion link in the Help Center 
sidebar, then click a given topic listed. 

As you'll see, there's a bevy of information available in the Help Center. 
Look here if you're having trouble finding something on the site, or just 
don't know how to do something. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Part 

Facebook for Friends 
and Family 

4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make 
New Ones 

5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 

6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 

7 Organizing Your Friends List 




This page intentionally left blank 



Chapfor' lL 



How to Find Old Friends— 
and Make New Ones 



Facebook is all about connecting with friends. In fact, the con- 
nections you make on Facebook are officially called "friends." 
You invite someone to be your friend, you add that person to 
your friends list, you manage your list of friends, your news 
feed displays the status updates of all your friends. Friends are 
part and parcel of the Facebook community. 

Of course, before you can make someone your Facebook 
friend, you have to find that person on Facebook. That isn't 
always as easy as you might think, especially when you're 
looking for people you went to school with several decades 
ago. People move, women change their names when they get 
married (or divorced, or remarried, or some combination of 
the above), it's just darned difficult to track down some folks. 
Doesn't mean it can't be done, however. And if they're on 
Facebook, you can probably find them. 

How Facebook Helps You 
Reconnect 

When it comes to finding lost friends and family members, size 
is everything. That is, the more people there are in the commu- 
nity, the more likely it is that the person you're looking for will 
be there. 

And when it comes to size, Facebook is the biggest online 
community out there. Five hundred million users makes for a 
pretty big pond; it's the one website that just about everybody 
signs onto, sooner or later. 



52 CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 

The size of the Facebook community is both a good and a bad thing, of 
course. It's good in that it's so big that just about anyone you're looking for 
is probably a member. It's bad in that there are so many people to browse 
through, it's difficult to find any one individual. The person you're looking for 
is probably there, somewhere, if you only knew how to find him. 

Fortunately, Facebook offers several tools for finding people on the site. 
First, Facebook can cross-tabulate your email and instant message con- 
tact lists with its own membership database, identifying your contacts who 
are also Facebook members. Second, you can search the site by name, 
although that can be somewhat frustrating when you're searching for some- 
one with a fairly common name (try looking for "John Brown" — or "Michael 
Miller," for that matter). Finally, you can search for people by location (city 
or state), the school they went to, or the company they work or worked for; 
this is a good way to find former neighbors, classmates, and co-workers. 

The end result is that you can create a Facebook network that consists of a 
fairly large number of people you used to know but haven't necessarily been 
in contact with for a while. 

Personally, I've used Facebook to connect with several old high school 
and college friends, some of whom I hadn't talked to in more than twenty 
years. It took a bit of work, but once I made a few initial contacts, the others 
started to pour in. It's a matter of working through the connections, literally 
finding friends of friends. 

That is, someone you know might be friends j. 

with someone else you know; this is particu- /V^N OtG 

larly common when you're dealing with old 

school friends. After you connect with one As far as Facebook IS 

friend, you can view their friends and find a lot concerned, everyone you 

know is a "friend" — even 

of people you know in common. Knock down , .. . , 

f f ' family members. So when 

one domino and they all start tumbling. , ta|k about Facebook 

As a result, I now have more than 1 50 friends friends, these could be 

on Facebook, and I'm making more by the your siblings or children, 

day. Some of these friends are newer, — peo- 



people you work with 

faint acquaintances, or 
pie I know in the publishing and marketing even rea| friends |fs just 

communities— but many are my old school 

mates. I can't say they all look familiar, not 



a name. 






Why Friends Are Important 53 

after so many years (we all get older, don't we?), but I remember them all. 
Or most of them, anyway; the old memory isn't quite what it used to be. 

Why Friends Are Important 

Why are friends important? Well, I can't speak to the value of friends in real 
life (actually, I could, but this isn't the place for that), but I can tell you why 
friends are important on Facebook. 

It's simple, really, and all about access. For a person to have full access to 
your Facebook Profile page and status updates, they must be added to your 
friends list. It's the same in reverse; you must be on that person's friends list 
to view his or her full Profile page and status updates. 

In addition, when you add someone to your friends list, all of his or her 
status updates automatically appear on the News Feed on your Facebook 
Home page. Likewise, when you're added to someone else's friends list, all 
of your status updates appears in that person's News Feed. It's a great way 
of keeping tabs on what your friends are doing. 

Fortunately, there is no practical limit to the number of friends you can have 
on Facebook (okay, you can have up to 5,000 friends— a number you're 
never going to reach), so you don't have to pick and choose; you can make 
anybody a friend if you so wish. Some people have hundreds of Facebook 
friends, while others have just a few. It's all up to you. 

That said, there is no expectation that you 
will dutifully read all the posts from all of your 
Facebook friends. In fact, when you add a per- 
son to your Facebook friends list, that doesn't The process of findjng 
even imply that the person is a "friend" in the new Faceb ook friends is 

traditional use of the word. You might not called friending. When 

even know that person; Facebook friends can you remove someone 

be total strangers in real life. On Facebook, from your friends list, you 

they're just people you follow— and who follow unfriend them. 
you. 



I " ,l \ 

L^Note 



54 CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 

Making Friends with People You're Already 
in Contact With 

Let's start with the easiest way to find friends on Facebook— by letting 
Facebook do the work. If you recall, when you first signed up for your 
Facebook account, Facebook asked to look through your email contacts list 
for potential friends. You might have done this or you might not have; I typi- 
cally ignore this step when I'm first getting started. In any case, there's a lot 
more looking that can be done, at any time you feel like it. 

Finding Friends You Email 

Even though today's college and high school generations seem to have 
abandoned email as being too slow and old fashioned (Email? Old fash- 
ioned already?), us oldsters still rely on email as a primary means of com- 
municating online— especially for work and with family members. As such, 
it's a fair assumption that if you email someone on a regular basis, you 
might want to become Facebook friends with him or her. 

To that end, Facebook can look through your email contact lists for people 
who are also Facebook members, and then invite those people to be your 
friends. Here's how it works. 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 
(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 

2. On the Friends page, shown in Figure 4.1, scroll to the Find People You 
Email section. 

3. If you use a web-based email service, such as Yahoo! Mail or Gmail, type 
your email address into the Your Email box. Then type your password into 
the Email Password box. Click the Find Friends button to display a list of 
email contacts who are also Facebook members. 

4. If you use Microsoft Outlook to check your email, click the Upload Contact 
File link. When the page changes to that shown in Figure 4.2, check the 
Automatically Import My Contacts from Outlook option and click the Find 
Friends button to display a list of Outlook contacts who are also Facebook 
members. 



Making Friends with People You're Already in Contact With 55 



j£ Friends + Create* Let 



We'd like to help you find your friends 

Your friends on Facebook are the same friends, acquaintances and family members that you 
communicate with in the real world. You can use any of the tools on this page to fnd more friends. 



^ Find People You Email Upload Contact File 

Searching your email account is the fastest way to find your friends on Facebcok. 



Your Email: 
Email Password: 



A Facebook will not store your password. Learn More. 



Figure 4.1 . Finding people you email. 



$E1 Find People You Email Use Webmail Contacts 

Searching your email account is the fastest way to find your friends on Facebook 

$■ Automatically import my contacts from Outlook 

If you use M krosoft Outlook, you can import your contacts into Facebook automatically. 

O Upload a contact file 



Figure 4.2. Finding friends in your Outlook or other email client contact lists. 

5. If you use another software program to manage your email, such as 
Outlook Express, Eudora, or Mozilla Thunderbird, you should also click 
the Upload Contact File link. When the page changes, check the Upload a 
Contact File option and then click the Browse or Choose File button. When 
the Choose File to Upload dialog box appears, navigate to and select your 
email contacts file. When you return to the Friends page, click the Find 
Friends button to upload your email contacts list to Facebook and display a 
list of email contacts who are also Facebook members. 

6. When the list of email contacts appears, as shown in Figure 4.3, check the 
box next to each person to whom you'd like to be friends. 

7. Click the Add as Friends button to send friend requests to these contacts. 

Facebook now sends friend requests to the people you selected. When a 
person accepts your request, you become friends with that person. If a per- 
son does not accept your request, you don't become friends. 



56 



CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 



1ft Friends 



+ Create a List 



You have 39 Gmail contacts on Facebook that you can add as your friends. 

You are already Facebook friends with a person from your Gmail contact list. 

Select which contacts to add as friends from the list below . You can also try another email account to find 
more friends. 



I - Select All Friends 



n 
n 
n 



David F. Leopold 



Da dene Sh e p a rd 



Stephanie Smith Miller 



n 



■ 



Figure 4.3. Identifying people you'd like to be friends with. 



Finding Friends You Instant Message 

Just as email contacts are likely to be potential Facebook friends, the peo- 
ple you instant message (IM) with might also be people you want to add 
to your Facebook friends list. To that end, 
Facebook can look through your IM contacts 
and find those who are also Facebook mem- 
bers. 



rH-H^ 

L^Note 



Follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click 
Friends in the sidebar. (Alternatively, click 
Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that 
option.) 

2. When the Friends page appears, scroll to 
the Find People You IM section, shown in 
Figure 4.4. 



At the present time, 
Facebook can import 
friends' lists from AOL 
Instant Messenger (AIM), 
ICQ, and Windows Live 
Messenger. It is not yet 
compatible with Yahoo! 
Messenger or Google Talk. 



' 



Making Friends with People You're Already in Contact With 57 



^ Find People You IH 

Turn your instant messenger buddies into 
Facebook friends. 

Import contacts from: 

ADL Instant Messenger » 

ICQ Chat » 

Windows Live Messenger * 

Figure 4.4. Finding friends you instant message. 

3. Click the link for the IM service you use: AOL Instant Messenger, ICQ Chat, 
or Windows Live Messenger. 

4. When prompted, enter your IM screen name, number, or ID, along with 
your password. 

5. Click the Find Friends button. 

6. Facebook now displays a list of your IM friends who are also members of 
Facebook. Check the box next to each person to whom you'd like to send 
a friend request. 

7. Click the Add as Friends button. 

Facebook now does the whole friends request thing. 

Finding Co-Workers 

Here's another place to look for current friends— among the people you 
work with. Facebook makes it quite easy to find other employees of the 
company you work for, and then invite them to become friends. Here's how 
it works: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 
(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 

2. When the Friends page appears, scroll to the Search for People section, 
shown in Figure 4.5. 

3. Somewhere in this section should be a link for the business you currently 
work for— assuming that you specified your employer when you entered 
your personal information. Look for a link that says Find Coworkers From 
Business, then click that link. 



58 



CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 



Q Search for People 



Enter a name or email 



Find dassmates from Ben Davis High School 

1975* 

Find current or past college classmates * 

Find former coworkers from Pearson 

Education » 

Find former coworkers from ATfiJ » 



Figure 4.5. Finding friends you work with. 

4. Facebook now displays a list of members 
who are also employed by this business. 
Check the box next to each person to 
whom you'd like to send a friend request. 

5. Click the Add as Friends button. 



Searching for Long Lost 
Friends 






ote 



If you work for a very large 
company, you're likely 
to see a long list of co- 
workers— even those who 
work in different locations. 
It might take some time to 
scroll through the list and 
find the people you physi- 
cally work with. 






The previous steps help you find people you 

currently associate with who are also members of Facebook. But what 
about those people who you haven't seen in a while— sometimes a very, 
very long while? This entails a bit more effort on your part. 



Finding Former Co-Workers 

Let's start by looking for people you used to work with— that is, co-workers 
at a former employer. Assuming you provided the name of your former 
employers when you filled in your personal information, Facebook should 
be able to list current and former employees of that business. You can then 
pick through the list and find those folks you want to reconnect with. 

Just follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 

(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 



Searching for Long Lost Friends 59 

2. When the Friends page appears, scroll to the Search for People section. 

3. Somewhere in this section should be a link for the business you used to 
work for. Look for a link that says Find Former Coworkers from Business, 
then click that link. 

4. Facebook now displays a list of members who have also been employed 
by this business. Check the box next to each person to whom you'd like to 
send a friend request. 

5. Click the Add as Friends button. 



Finding Former Classmates 

Finding people you used to go to school with is equally easy— assuming 
that both you and they entered your school as part of your personal infor- 
mation. You should find lists of Facebook members who went to your high 
school and your college, or even multiple colleges if you went that route. 
These will be lists of classmates who graduated the same year you did. 

Here's how to find these folks: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 
(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 

2. When the Friends page appears, scroll to the Search for People section. 

3. Somewhere in this section should be a link for the school you went to. 
Look for a link that says Find Classmates from School Year, then click that 
link. (For example, I graduated from Indiana University in 1980, so I had a 
link for Find Classmates from Indiana University Bloomington 1980.) 

4. Facebook now displays a list of members who also graduated from this 
school when you did, as shown in Figure 4.6. If you want to display class- 
mates who graduated in a different class, pull down the list at the top of 
the page and select a different year. 

5. Check the box next to each person to whom you'd like to send a friend 
request. 

6. Click the Add as Friends button. 



60 



CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 



Searching for 



from people in Ben Davis High School 1976 [r_] 



Displaying 1 - 10 of 303 people. 



More Search Options 





H Name: Aggie Hewby Bastill Add as Friend 

Send a Message 
View Friends 






1 Name: Alicia Bryant Harper Add as Friend 

^1 4T^^I Send a Message 

HI 






B Name: Amanda Farlow-Davls Add as Friend 
■ Friends; 1 mutual friend Send a Message 

View Friends 





Figure 4.6. Finding former classmates on Facebook. 



Searching by Name or Email Address 

That's all well and good, but what about finding people you knew back then 
but didn't go to your school? Or long lost family members? Or just people 
you met along the way? 

Fortunately, Facebook lets you search for people by either name or email 
address. (Although it's unlikely that you know the email address of some- 
one you haven't seen in twenty years...) You can search for people from 
the search box on the Facebook toolbar or the one on the Friends page, 
although I prefer doing all my friend searching from the Friends page. 

Follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 
(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 

2. From the Friends page, scroll to the Search for People section, shown in 
Figure 4.7. 

3. Type a name or email address into the search box, then click the Search 
button (the magnifying glass) or press Enter on your keyboard. 



Accepting Friend Requests 



61 



^ Search for People 



Enter a name or email 



Figure 4.7. Searching for friends on Facebook. 



4. When the search results page appears, as shown in Figure 4.8, make sure 
that People is selected in the sidebar. 



Sam Spade 



<\ All Result 



Cj] Pages 
[u] Groups 
^ Applications 
fa^ Events 

Web Results 
[O Posts by Friends 
|Fl Posts by Everyone 





Filter By: | Location 


| | School 


| | Workplace 


| Refine Search 










BH~ 


-Sam Spade 


Add as Friend 
Send a Message 




Sam Spade 



Add as Friend 
Send a Message 



Sam Spade 



Add as Friend 
Send a Message 



Figure 4.8. The results of a friends search. 

5. Click the Add as Friend link next to the 
person to whom you wish to send a friend 
request. 



Accepting Friend Requests 

Sometimes potential friends find you before 
you find them. When this happens, they will 
send you a friend request, which you can 
then accept or decline. You might receive a 
friend request via email, or you can view friend 
requests within Facebook. 



fGTn^ 



If the friend you're looking 
for has a relatively common 
name, such as John Smith, 
there might be too many 
people with that name on 
Facebook to find the cor- 
rect one. It may be easier 
to search for that person 
by entering his or her email 
address, if you know it. 



62 CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 

Here's how it all works: 

1. To view pending friend requests, click the Friend Requests icon in the 
Facebook toolbar, shown in Figure 4.9. 



facebook 


Jj, H H Search 






Friend Requests Find Your Friends 


■ — —=* 





Figure 4.9. Viewing pending friend requests. 

2. To view the Profile of a person requesting to be your friend, click his or her 
name. 

3. To accept this friend request, click the Confirm button. 

4. To refuse this request, click the Ignore button. 

Now, here's the deal. You don't have to accept a friend request, even if you 
know that person in the real world. Remember, once you've accepted a 
friend request, that person can view all your personal information and status 
updates. (That's unless you alter your privacy settings to hide information 
from that person, as we'll discuss in Chapter 21 , "Keeping Some Things 
Private.") You might not want to accept all the friend requests you receive; 
that's your prerogative. 

Exploring Facebook's Friend Suggestions 

Here's something else that Facebook does: Recommend people to be new 
friends. That sounds kind of odd and maybe a little intrusive, but that's the 
way Facebook works; it wants everybody to be friends with everybody else. 

Facebook's friend recommendations typically come from mutual associa- 
tions. That is, they're usually friends of existing friends, or they go to your 
school or are employed by the same company, or something similar. You 
can go along with these recommendations or just ignore them. 



Finding Friends of Friends 



63 



Remember, though, that these are just recommendations. If you agree that 
you'd like to be a friend with one of these folks, you still have to send them 
a friend request. 

So here's how to view these recommendations— and how to deal with them: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 
(Alternatively, click Find Friends on the toolbar, if you have that option.) 

2. When the Friends page appears, scroll to the Suggestions section, shown 
in Figure 4.10. 



jCQ> Suggestions 








Add people you know as friends and connect with public profiles you like. 






^^ Ce Walls 

k Add as friend 


X 1 ■ LynnZiiiyrdf X 

H Add as friend 

11 


Darlene 
Sh epa rd 

Add as friend 


X 


I Dill 

• Gladstone 

■ Add as friend 


x 1 ■ Mancv Lewis x 1 

H Add as friend 


■ Mike 
H Richards 

H Add as friend 


X 


H Stephanie 
1 Smith Miller 

H Add as friend 


X & Scottlt X 1 
■ Flanders 

H Add as friend 


1 AlecHauser 

H Add as friend 


X 



Figure 4.10. Viewing Facebook's friend suggestions. 

3. To send a friend request to a person, click the Add as Friend link. 

4. To ignore a friend suggestion, click the X next to that person's name. 



Finding Friends of Friends 



Another way to find old friends is to look for people who are friends of your 
current friends. That is, when you make someone your friend on Facebook, 
you can browse through the list of people who are on their friends list. 
Chances are you'll find mutual friends on this list— people that both of you 
know but you haven't found otherwise. 

You find friends of your friends on your friends' Profile pages. Look on the 
left side of the Profile page for a box labeled Friends, like the one shown in 
Figure 4.11; these are the people on this person's friends list. Click the See 
All link to view all these people. 



64 



CHAPTER 4 How to Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones 



Friends 

146 friends See All 


*■■ 

Wade Deb Sivard Amy Elliott 
Baker 


Brad Koch Michael Nathan 
Michards Johnson 


mm 

Shellye A. Elodie Lee Tom French 
Kanlm 



Figure 4.1 1. The Friends box on a person's Profile page. 

Facebook now displays that person's Friends 
page, like the one shown in Figure 4.12. To 
view a person's Profile page, just click his or 
her name. To send a friend request to a per- 
son, click the Add as Friend button. You'd be 
surprised how many old friends you can turn 
up this way! 



L^Note 



There's also a box for 
Mutual Friends. These 
are people on both your 
friends list and your 
friend's friends list; you 
already know these folks. 






Michael Miller ► Friends 



Showing: Mutual Friends 

S h o '/■« : Choose an option. . . [rj 
Michael has 146 friends. 

Alan Douglas Bower 



Alec Ha user 

DePaul '11 

Glenbard West High School '07 



Amadou M. Sail 
Zivylin 



Amanda Farlow-Davis 



Search Friends 



1 2 3 Next 
Add as Friend 



Add as Friend 



Add as Friend 



Add as Friend 



Amy Elliott 

Hamline Alum '06 
Rasmussen College '10 



Add as Friend 



Figure 4.1 2. Viewing all of a person's Facebook friends. 



Finding Friends of Friends 65 



Finding Hard-to-Find Friends 



When it comes to tracking down old friends on Facebook, sometimes a 
little detective work is in order. It's especially tough to find women you 
used to know, as names get changed along with marital status. Some 
women have enough forethought to enter their maiden name as their 
middle name on Facebook, so the Cathy Coolidge you used to know 
might be listed as Cathy Coolidge Smith, which means their maiden 
name will actually show up in a Facebook search. Others, however, 
don't do this— and thus become harder to find. 

You can, of course, search for a partial name— searching just for 
"Cathy," for example. What happens next is a little interesting. 
Facebook returns a list of people named Cathy, of course, but puts at 
the top of this list people who have mutual friends in common with you. 
That's a nice touch, as it's likely that your old friend has already made a 
connection with another one of your Facebook friends. 

Past that point, you can then display everyone on Facebook with that 
single name. But that's going to be a bit unwieldy, unless your friend 
has a very, very unique name. 

One approach to narrowing down the results is to specify a location in 
your search. For example, if you're looking for a John Smith and think 
he currently lives in Minnesota, you would search for John smith min- 
nesota. It's even better if you think you know a city; searching for John 
smith minneapolis will narrow the results even further. 

Other information added to your query can also help you better find 
people. For example, if you know where that person works, add the 
name of the company to the query. So if you think John Smith works at 
IBM, search for John smith ibm. 

Beyond these tips, finding long-lost friends on Facebook is a trial- 
and-error process. The best advice is to keep plugging — if they're on 
Facebook, you'll find them sooner or later. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter- S 



Visiting Friends and 
Family on Facebook 

After you've found family members and old friends and made 
them part of your Facebook friends list, now what? 

Actually, there's a lot that can happen next. First, you can 
keep up-to-date on your friends' daily comings and goings 
via the News Feed on your Facebook Home page. You can 
pore over your friends' personal information, photographs, 
and the like on their individual Profile pages. You can even 
leave comments on your friends' postings and leave your 
own messages. 

It's all part of the community aspect of the Facebook com- 
munity—and how you can get closer to your friends online. 

Catching Up with the Facebook 
News Feed 

Let's start by going home— to the Facebook Home page, 
that is. This is where you find a constant feed of status 
updates from everyone on your friends list. It's how you keep 
abreast of the latest developments regarding your friends. 

Viewing the News Feed 

When you sign into Facebook and open your Home page 
(www.facebook.com — or click the Home button on the 
Facebook toolbar), you see something called the News Feed. 
As you can see in Figure 5.1 , this is a feed of the most recent 
status updates from people on your friends' list. 



68 



CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



HI News Feed 



Top News ■ Most Recent 



What's on your mind? 



Michael diehard? Liked the Tony Awards last night! 
about an hour ago * Comment * Like 



Michael Miller Two-ye a r old Hayley was up all night with bad 
dreams... Hope she sleeps better tonight 
about an hour ago ■ Comment Like 



m 



Tom French added Yodeling to his activities. 
-r about an hour ago 



Michael Miller Re-recording (for about the fourth time] the Privacy 
Settings lesson for my Facebook Essentials video. Please, FB, don't 
change anything else! 
Yesterday at 10:27pm Comment Like 

■ Roger Dellinger good luck with that, FB seems to change 
their privacy policy on a weekly basis. 
16 hours ago 

Write a comment... 



Figure 5.1. The News Feed on Facebook's Home page. 



These status updates are displayed more or less in reverse chronological 
order. This means that the most recent updates are at the top and the older 
ones are at the bottom. To view even older updates, scroll to the bottom of 
the page and click the Older Posts button. 

What are you likely to find in a typical status update? Most updates are 
short text messages, although updates can also include photos, videos, 
notices of upcoming events, and links to other Web pages. If there's a 
photo in a status update, like the one in Figure 5.2, click the photo to view 
it at a larger size— and within the context of the photo album in which it 
resides. If there's a video in the status update, like the one in Figure 5.3, 
click the video to begin playback. If there's an event listed in the status 
update, like the one in Figure 5.4, click it to read more details and RSVP, if 
you're invited. If there's a link in the status update, like the one in Figure 5.5, 
click it to leave Facebook and visit the linked-to page. Pretty straightfor- 
ward, really. 



Catching Up with the Facebook News Feed 



69 



Sherry "French Elliott Miller okay.. .technically, he was still a junior last 
weekend. Ben at state Ultimate tournament 2010. ..can't believe "my baby" is a 
senior 

Ben's Senior Year 



7 n 



[§j Friday at 3:48am ■ Comment Like ■ Share 



Figure 5.2, A status update with a photo attached. 



Michael Miller Collin and Hayley dancing to Jack Brass Band at the park 
ifB3GI in Bumsvills. 

Concert in the Park [HD] 
Length: 2:25 

*£* November IB, 2009 at 11:27am ■ Comment ■ Like ■ Share 




Figure 5.3. A status update with a video attached. 



Tom French Come one come all and bring all your friends! 

I Homecoming Party! 

I Sunday, April 11, 2030 at 7:00pm 
^H^fl Bob's House 

[ai] March 7 at 4: 44pm * Comment Like ■ Share 



Figure 5.4. A status update with an event attached. 



Michael Miller Just replaced my five year-old Sony rear projector in the 
basement home theater with a brand-new Samsung 58" plasma. So far r 
looks good. 

5S" wklescreen plasma HDTV PN5SB55Q 5S" 1080p Plasma 
HDTV - Plasma TV - Televisions | SAMSUNG 

www.samsung.com 

SAMSUNG PN5SB55DT2F 53 widescreen plasma HDTV The PN5SB55Q 
plasma HDTV is perfect for action-packed sports and movies. It uses 
new e -panel technology which reduces blurring and produces crisp , 
dear images. And lQSOp high definition brings out the brilliance and 
darity in everything you see. Plu 

£J March 7 at 3: 19pm - Comment ■ Like ■ Share 




Figure 5.5. A status update with a link to another Web page. 



By the way, if a friend posts from somewhere other than the Facebook 
page on his or her personal computer, you see this underneath the post. 
For example, Figure 5.6 shows a post made from a friend's iPhone. Posts 
can also be made from cell phones via text messaging and via third-party 
applications, such as TweetDeck and Foursquare, that automate posting to 
Facebook and other social networking sites. 



70 CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



?t.^. 



Michael Miller I'm drinking a chai now 

|3 10 seconds ago via Facebook for iPhone * Comment Like 



Figure 5.6. A status update made via iPhone. 

Your friends are likely to post about what they're doing and what they're 
thinking. Some people post once a day, some post once a week, some 
post several times a day, some don't post much at all. There are no rules or 
guidelines as to how often someone should post, or what they should post 
about. To me, the best posts keep me updated on the most imortant events 
in my friends' lives— what activities they're participating in, what their kids 
are up to, when they're sick or well, that sort of thing. But you never know 
what your friends will post, which is what makes it interesting. 

Viewing More Updates from More Friends 

I said earlier that the News Feed contains status updates from your friends. 
That's true, but by default it doesn't include updates from all your friends. 
There are actually two levels of settings for what you see in the News Feed, 
and the default Top News setting filters out a lot of the people on your 
friends list. 

That's right, by default Facebook doesn't show you updates from all your 
friends. The Top News setting only displays updates from whom Facebook 
determines are your most "interesting" friends. Don't ask me what this 
means. All I know is that only about a quarter of my friends show up in the 
Top News feed, which is a bit annoying. 

If you want to view updates from all your friends, you have to switch the 
News Feed to the Most Recent setting. You do this by clicking Most Recent 
at the top right of the News Feed list, as shown in Figure 5.7. 



B News Feed Top News - Host Recent 

Figure 5.7. Switching from Top News to the Most Recent News Feed. 

If you find the Most Recent list to be overwhelming, you can switch back to 
the Top News display by clicking the Top News link. 



Catching Up with the Facebook News Feed 



71 



Viewing Only Status Updates from Your Friends 

I said before that the News Feed displays status updates from your friends. 
That's true, but that's not the only thing displayed in the News Feed. Any 
posts or uploads that your friends make, such as pictures uploaded to their 
photo albums, are also listed in the News Feed, as are updates from the 
games and applications they use. 

Some people feel this makes the News Feed a bit cluttered. If you'd prefer 
to view only status updates, from all your friends, you can display the Status 
Updates feed, shown in Figure 5.8. This is a somewhat hidden option on the 
Facebook site, but it's one you might want to check out. 







H Michael Michards 

KgS Edit My Profile 

n Welcome 
HO News Feed 
[^ Messages l[l) 
[3^ Events 
§] Photos 
ftft, Friends 

Recently Updated 


A StatUS Updates | + Update Status 


1 Michael Michards Liked the Tony Awards last night! 
^^^^| about an hour ago Comment Like 


11 Michael Miller Two-ye a r old Hayley was up all night with bad 
^» dreams... Hope she sleeps better tonight 

I^^H^fl about an hour ago Comment Like 


[ Status Updates 


fl Michael Miller Re-recording (for about the fourth time) the Privacy 
^v Settings lesson for my Facebook Essentials video. Please, FB, don't 
f~ ■^ r J change anything else! 

Yesterdav at lu:27om Comment Like 


§* Applications 



Figure 5.8. The Status Update feed— lean and clean. 

To display the Status Updates feed, go to the Facebook Home page and 
click Friends in the sidebar. When the Friends page appears the Friends sec- 
tion in the sidebar also expands; click Status Updates in the Friends section 
to display the Status Updates feed. 

The Status Update feed displays status updates only, no other notices or 
alerts. It's a pretty clean feed (there's not even a status update box at the 
top of the page), and one that many people wish was the Facebook default. 



Hiding Friends You Don't Like 

If you're like me, you'll find that some of your friends post a lot. No, I mean 
it, really a lot. Not just once or twice a day, but seemingly hourly. 

Posting more frequently isn't always a good thing, of course; some of my 
more annoying "friends" post about when they got up in the morning, what 



72 CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 

they had for breakfast, when they're fixing coffee, when they're feeling 
sleepy, and when they're going to bed— way too much information, if you 
ask me. 

Then there are those friends that really aren't friends sharing personal infor- 
mation, but rather are using Facebook to promote themselves or their busi- 
nesses. Fine and dandy, but at some point I just don't care. 

Of course, there are also those businesses and entertainers that you've 
said you "like" on Facebook. Posts from these entities also show up in your 
News Feed, and some of these can be really annoying. 

The point is, you may not always want to view status updates from every- 
one or everything that shows up in your News Feed. Fortunately, there's a 
way to filter whose updates appear in the News Feed, by hiding updates 
from selected friends. 

Hiding updates from a given person or entity is fairly easy. All you have to 
do is point to an update from that person to display the Hide button to the 
right of the post, as shown in Figure 5.9. This displays a box underneath the 
post, as shown in Figure 5.10. Click the Hide Friend button and no more 
status updates from this person will appear in your News Feed. Nice! 



Michael Miller Two-year old Hayley was up all night v^ith bad 

dreams... Hope she sleeps better tonight 
about an hour ago ■ Comment ■ Like 



Figure 5.9. Point to a status update to display the Hide button. 



Hide Michael Cancel 



Figure 5.10. Hiding status updates from a given friend. 

Hiding Updates from Applications and Games 

Some status updates aren't really updates from that person, but rather 
updates from an application or game that the person is using or playing. 
For example, you might see status updates alerting you that a friend has 
achieved a certain level on Farmville, or killed someone in Mafia Wars, or 
read a new book in their Goodreads library. 



Catching Up with the Facebook News Feed 73 

I find these automatically generated updates l " tl \ 

extremely intrusive— especially from people /^^|\| fltP 

who incessantly play these social games. 

It's possible to see update after update after Learn more about 

update from a person playing a game, which Facebook applications 

just takes up valuable space in your News and 9 ames in Chapter 18, 

p P pH "Finding Fun Games and 

Applications." 
Now, you could decide to hide all posts from 
your game-addicted friend, but that would be 

throwing the proverbial baby out with the bath water; you'd also hide any 
important posts they might make. A better option is to hide posts from that 
game or application, so that you're never bothered by Farmville or Mafia 
Wars again. 

Hiding posts from an application or game is similar to hiding posts from a 
person. Start by finding one of these annoying application-generated posts, 
then point to the post to display the Hide button. This displays a box under- 
neath the post, as shown in Figure 5.11. This box contains three buttons: 
Hide Friend, Hide Application, and Cancel. 






i Hide Michael Hide Foursquare Cancel i 



Figure 5.11. Click the Hide Application button to hide all automatic posts from this 
application. 

This time you want to click the Hide Application button. This will hide all 
future posts from this application regarding all your friends. You can banish 
Farmville forever! 

Commenting on Friends' Posts 

Sometimes you read a friend's post and you want to say something about it. 
To this end, Facebook enables you to comment on just about any post your 
friends make. These comments then appear under the post in your News 
Feed, as shown in Figure 5.12. 



74 



CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



3! 


Michael Miller Still working on the Introduction to Social Netv 
textbook and The Ultimate Web Marketing Guide, as v^ell as a 
author reviews of these and other manuscripts. Busy, busy, bi_ 

■*lay 7 at 4: 42pm * Comment Like 

r Brad Koch You are an authoring machine. 
W May 7 at 7: 54pm ■ Delete 

9 Michael Miller And that's not counting a few online articles 
Sp and a bit of consulting work, either 
May 8 at 10:14am -Delete 


orking 
sorted 
sy! 


Write a comment. . . 





Figure 5.12. Comments under a friend's status update. 

To comment on a friend's status update, simply click the Comment link 
under that post. A Write a Comment box displays, like the one shown in 
Figure 5.13. Enter your comment then click the Share button; your comment 
will now appear underneath the original post, along with comments from 
any other people. 



f~\ Torn French How annoying is that thing on TV? 
W *i 2 hours ago * Comment • Like ■ See Wall-to-Wall 


■ 






I 






HSB 





Figure 5.13. Adding a comment under a friend's status update. 



Liking What You See 

Sometimes you want to voice your approval for a post but don't necessarily 
want to take the time to type out a comment. In this instance, you can sim- 
ply click the Like link under a status update. 
This puts a little "thumbs up" icon under the 
post, along with a message that you "like this." 



L^Note 



By the way, if you later decide you don't 
like that post, can go back and remove your 
approval. Just click the Unlike link, and you 
won't be listed as liking it any more. 



You can both like and 
comment on a post; 
they're not mutually exclu- 
sive. 






Catching Up with the Facebook News Feed 75 

Sharing a Posted Attachment 

When friends post an attachment to a status update— a photo, video, event, 
or Web page link— you can share that attachment with your friends on 
Facebook. You can share the attachment as a public post of your own, or 
via a private email message. 

To share an attachment as a status update, follow these steps: 

1. Click the Share link under your friend's status update. (This link only 
appears when an attachment is present; it isn't there for a standard text- 
only post.) 

2. When the Post to Profile dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 5.14, 
enter the text of your accompanying status update into the text box. 



Post to Profile 


. 








K 








Jj From the album: Ben's Senior Year 

MyHMiQ By Sherry 'French Sotf Miller 
^^^^Hlfl okay...technicaiY r he was sol a junior last weekend. Ben at state 
^^| Ultimate tournament 2010.. .can't believe 'my baby'is a senior 








|g| send as e 


Message 


nscead fi ~ 1 cancel 



Figure 5.14. Sharing a friend's attachment as a new status update. 



3. Click the Share button, and you create a new status update with your 
friend's original post and attachment attached. 

To share an attachment privately with another friend, follow these steps: 

1. Click the Share link under your friend's status update. 

2. When the Post to Profile dialog box appears, click the Send as a Message 
Instead link. 

3. When the Send as a Message dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 5.15, 
enter the name of the recipient into the To: box. If you're sending to mul- 
tiple friends, use commas to separate their names. 



76 



CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



Send as a Message 



Tl>; 
Message: 




Summer 2010 

Sherry Trench Elliott' Miller 

2G photos 

with one daughter, Laura and one granddaughter, Hayiey 



^} Post to Profile Instead 



-•-■•■ -"••* 



Figure 5.15. Sharing a friend's attachment as a private message. 

4. Enter an accompanying message into the Message: box. 

5. Click the Send Message button. 

Your friend(s) will now receive a Facebook message with the original status 
update and its attachment attached. 

Getting to and Getting to Know Your 
Friends' Profile Pages 

Reading status updates in your News Feed keeps you up-to-date on your 
friend's latest activities. But what about older activities? Or if you want to 
look at any photos or videos they've uploaded? Of if you just want to view 
his or her personal information? 

Everything you'd want to know about a Facebook friend is located on his or 
her individual Profile page. 

Displaying a Profile Page 

How do you display a friend's Profile page? It's easy: All you have to do is 
click that person's name anywhere on the Facebook site. 

Where can you find a person's name to click? There are lots of places: 

• In a status update in the News Feed on your Home page 

• In the From: field of a private message sent to you 



Getting to and Getting to Know Your Friends' Profile Pages 77 



• In a chat window when you're using Facebook's chat (instant messaging) 
feature 

• In the Friends section of your own Profile page 

• In the Friends section of another friend's Profile page 

You can also find your friends in your all-inclusive friends list. To display 
a list of all your friends, like the one shown in Figure 5.16, click Account 
in the Facebook toolbar and then select Edit Friends. When the next page 
appears, go to the Lists section of the sidebar and click Friends. What you 
see next is your friends list, alphabetized (by first name, unfortunately) from 
A to Z. Click any friend's name to display that person's Profile page. 















Search Friends 


| Create Hew List | | Edit List | | Delete List 


cz: 


► 1 












Add to List » 


X 


#& All Connections 


■j Bab Miller 


[|p Find Friend? 


1 La Julia, United States 


^1 Invite Friends 




Add to List ▼ 




C^ Browse 


"»" 1 LaJolla, CA 


@ Phonebook 




Add to List -r 


X 


fp, Recently Added 


;!■ 


HE Recently Updated 
Lists 


IKa Michael Miller 


Add to List » 


X 




i r^ 

1 V* ■' Tom French 


Add to List -r 




Eq] Pages 


Wg), LaMa.CA 


Figure 5.16. 


Your friends list. 







Navigating a Profile Page 

What do you see when you display a friend's Profile page? As you can see 
in Figure 5.17, a typical Profile page consists of a sidebar on the left side of 
the page, a series of tabs in the middle of the page, and another sidebar on 
the right. 



78 



CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



Profile picture 
Click to email 



Tabs Enter public message Updates on the Wall 




-Send Dinah a '.■■—-■r-r.c-r 
Chat with Dinah 
Poke Dinah 

Dinah is new to Facebook: 
Suggest Friends for Dinah 
Dinah's progress: 



In Forma Hon 

Relationship Status: 
In a Relationship 
Birthday: 

December 17, 1975 
Current City: 
La Holla, CA 



Mutual Friends 

2 fhends i 





Diljah La ice Can lou believe the weath 
Wall Info Photos 



i r today? - -- 



Create an Ad 



Write something.. 



Attadu El S* 



fl] 



Bob Miller Ni Hao r Kai-Lan! 

2 seconds aao - Comment ■ Like ■ See Wall -to-Wall 



Dinah Lance Can you believe the weather today? 
5 minutes ago ■ Comment Like 



Dinah Lance Fm happy with things right now 
5 minutes ago ■ Comment - Like 



RECENT ACTIVITY 

ig, Dinah is now friends with Michael Richards, Michael Miller and Bob Miller 





y| Dinah changed her Work Info , ■ Comram ■ Lite 
^ Dinah added Young Life and 3M to her em plovers, 
j£| Dinah updated her current dty to La Jolla, California. 
£/ Dinah added Digital photograph',' to her interests. 
Dinah likes Nikki Yanofsky and 4other pages, 



m 



Personal information 



Figure 5.17. A typical Profile page. 



Ads and such 



The sidebar on the left is the most important one of the two. It contains 
your friend's Profile picture, a link to send this person a private message 
(via Facebook email), all manner of personal information (relationship sta- 
tus; spouse, children, and siblings; birthday; current city; and such), a list of 
mutual friends, a list of all that person's friends, links to your friend's pho- 
tos, and assorted other information and links. It's a nice and concise intro- 
duction to this person. 

The sidebar on the right is much less useful. Basically, it contains advertise- 
ments. You can ignore it. 

The tabs in the middle of the page display more specific information. While 
some of the tabs might differ from person to person, everyone has the same 
three tabs on their Profile pages: Wall, Info, and Photos. You might also find 
tabs for Videos or Events, a Boxes tab with information about the applica- 
tions that person uses, or even tabs for specific applications. It all depends 



Reading the Wall— and Leaving Your Own Comments 



79 



on what that person does on Facebook and the configuration options cho- 
sen. 

We'll look at the three most important tabs next. 

Reading the Wall— and Leaving Your Own 
Comments 

The first tab on a person's page is always the Wall, shown in Figure 5.18. 
The Wall is kind of like a News Feed of just that person's activities— status 
updates, photo postings, event subscriptions, and the like. Like a News 
Feed page, updates and postings are displayed in reverse chronological 
order, with the newest at the top. 



Wall Info Photos 



Write something... 
Attach: Q ■£■ m £fl 



Bob Miller 

Birthday Party 

Tuesday. June 29. 2010 at 10:00pm 
My House 

Hfl Mardi 29 at 5:02pm - Comment ■ tike ■ Share * RSVP to this event 
Bob Miller 



C^ Filters 




^\ 


m 





Interesting Stuff 

Ol March 29 at 4: 55pm ■ Comment ■ Like ■ Share 

Bob Miller Can you believe what that guy just said on TV? 
March 7 at 3 : 23pm Comment " Like 



Bob Miller I think I may order a pizza for dinner. 
March 7 at 3 : 14pm Comment Like 



RECENT ACTIVITY 

f^3 Bob wrote on your Wall. 

^jn, Bob and Lew Archer are now friends. ■ Comment ■ Like 



Figure 5.18. The Wall tab. 



You can comment on and "like" status updates on a friend's Wall. Obviously, 
other people's comments are also displayed. 



80 CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 

You can also leave your own public messages on a friend's wall. Just type 
your message into the Write Something box at the top of the tab, then click 
the Share button. Your message to your friend will now be displayed on her 
Wall, for your friend and all of her friends to see. 

You can attach a photo, video, link to another website, or a virtual "gift" to 
your posting; just click the appropriate button beneath the Write Something 
box and make the necessary choices. We talk more about these message 
attachments in Chapter 8, "Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing," 
as they're also available when you're making your own status updates. 

Viewing Your Friends' Personal Information 

The second tab on a friend's Profile page is the Info tab, shown in Figure 
5.19. This tab consists of several sections of personal information, as fol- 
lows: 

• About Me, complete with Basic Info (gender, birthday, relatives on 
Facebook, current city, home town, and the like), Bio (a short biography 
entered by the person him- or herself), and Favorite Quotations. 

• Work and Education, which functions as a mini-resume, complete with 
current and past employers, high schools and colleges attended, and 
such. 

• Likes and Interests, including Activities, Music, Books, Movies, Television, 
and the like. 

• Contact Information, if displayed, which can include a person's email 
address, postal address, website, and such. 

Scattered amongst all these pieces of information are lots and lots of blue 
links. Clicking these links take you to other pages on Facebook. These can 
be other people's Profile pages, or pages for groups, locations, companies, 
entertainers, books, movies, you name it. Click around to see what you find. 

Now, not every person opts to enter or display every piece of information. 
That's a personal choice, and understandable. Still, you can find out a lot 
about what a friend has been up to by perusing their Info tab. 



Looking at Photos 



81 



Dinah Lance 


Can you believe the 


weather today? 9 t ^-Hsagc. 


Wall Info 


Photos 






About Me 


Basic Info 


Sex: 


Female 




Birthday: 


December 17, 1975 




Relationship Status: 


In a Relationship 




Interested In: 


Men 




Looking For: 


Friendship 




Current City: 


La Jolla, California 




Hometown: 


Seattle , Washington 




Political Views: 


Democratic Party 




Religious Views: 


Christian 


Bio 


I am a fun loving person. I like dogs and cats and have a rich family life. 


Favorite 


When in Rome, do as 


the Romans do. 


Quotations 






Work and Education 


Em plovers 


Young Life 

Fundraiser 




3H 2003-2007 






Business Manager 






Uptown, Minneapolis 





Figure 5.19. The Info tab. 



Looking at Photos 



Many Facebookers use the site for sharing photos 
ily. These uploaded photos are typically organized 
displayed on a person's Profile page, on the 
Photos tab. 

As you can see in Figure 5.20, a typical Photos 
tab starts with photos of that person arranged 
at the top. Scroll down and you see the photo 
albums that this person has uploaded. Click 
the thumbnail for a photo album to see the 
photos inside. Click any photo thumbnail to 
view a larger version of that photo. 



with friends and fam- 
into photo albums and 



I " "^ 



ote 



Learn more about 
Facebook's photo fea- 
tures in Chapter 11, 
"Sharing Family Pictures." 



82 CHAPTER 5 Visiting Friends and Family on Facebook 



Photos of Michael 45 photos 
View Comments 



=— 1 


i i 




^L* 


^^J^^J 


1 y--+ ^*jf^^ 1 


>; 


L 1 


^^H 


r^^ 


' u 


1 fc, J 




F :.'<S3e4, , 1 





■ ^H 









Michael's Albums 5 Photo Albums 
View Comments 




Figure 5.20. Tfre Photos tab. 



Viewing Other Tabs 



As I said before, some people will have more tabs than these displayed on 
their Profile pages. For example, if a friend has uploaded home movies to 
the site, they'll have a Video tab on their page; if they've scheduled or sub- 
scribed to an event, they'll have an Events tab. There might also be tabs 
for specific applications, such as LivingSocial or Goodreads. So everyone's 
Profile page will be different. 

Facebook can display up to six visible tabs on a Profile page. If a person 
has more than six tabs, the additional tabs can be viewed by clicking the 
double right arrow (») tab at the far right of the tab list. This displays a 
drop-down menu of the other available tabs, as shown in Figure 5.21 ; click 
an item to open that tab. 



Viewing Other Tabs 83 





Wall Info Photos Events weRead 


Albums 


n 




D Notes 
Boxes 
, — LivingSorial 
"S" Video 
9 Goodreads 




Write something... 


Attach: la £• EE £D ^ 


R Michael Miller Two-year old Hayley was up 


all night with 


' ^3 sleeps better toniqht 







Figure 5.21. Accessing other tabs. 

All Comments Are Public 

I'll say this several times throughout the book, but it's important to 
remember that Facebook is a public website. That means that just 
about everything you do on Facebook is visible to everybody else. 

This is especially true in the comments you leave on your friends' status 
updates. It's easy to trick yourself into thinking that leaving a comment 
is a bit like replying to a private email, but a Facebook comment isn't 
private at all. Any comment you make is visible to all of your friend's 
friends, and possibly to everybody else on the Facebook site. (This last 
possibility depends on how your friend has configured his or her pri- 
vacy settings.) 

If you think you're leaving a private reply, you're more apt to write 
something that you really shouldn't. I'll give you an example. I was 
reading the comments on a friend's page a while back, and saw a com- 
ment to one of the updates there. A friend of my friend made a com- 
ment, my friend commented back, something along the lines of "how 
have things been going?," and the resulting comment was a long litany 
of how this person's wife was having an affair, and how awful his life 
was, and on and on in that fashion. Obviously, this comment was not 
private, since I was reading it, but the poster— the friend of my friend- 
either didn't know or care that his comment was a very public one. 

The take-away here is that you shouldn't make any comment to any 
post that you don't want all your other friends to read. Facebook com- 
ments are not the place to post private messages; they're the Facebook 
equivalent of public announcements, and should be treated as such. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter K 



Keeping Tabs on Your 
Kids 



Facebook is a great place to reconnect with old friends. It's 
also a great place to connect with family members— espe- 
cially your children. 

Now, this assumes that your kids are on Facebook, which 
they probably are. (Almost all young people under 25 or 
so are.) It also assumes that your kids will want to be your 
Facebook friends— although there are things you can do if 
you're left unfriended. 

The point is to not so much use Facebook as a way to com- 
municate with your kids (although you can do that), but 
rather use Facebook to keep a watchful eye on what your 
kids are doing. Most young people use Facebook as a bit of 
a personal diary, posting all sorts of juicy details as to their 
private thoughts and activities; you can find out a lot about 
what your kids are up to just by reading their Facebook sta- 
tus updates. 

Making Your Children Your Friends 

The first step in using Facebook to watch your children is 
to add your kids to your friends list. This should be a fairly 
straightforward process— in fact, Facebook might suggest 
your children as friends when you first sign up, especially if 
you have your kids' addresses in your email contacts list. 

Otherwise, you need to do a simple search for your kids on 
the Facebook site, as we discussed in Chapter 4, "How to 
Find Old Friends— and Make New Ones." You can search 
either by name or by email address, if in fact your kids have 



86 CHAPTER 6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 

an email address and you know what it is. In any case, it shouldn't be too 
hard to find your children on Facebook and then send out the necessary 
friend requests. 

What to Do If Your Kids Hide from You on 
Facebook 

What do you do if one of your kids refuses your friend request? First, pat 
yourself on the back; you have a smart, technically savvy, and understand- 
ably wary offspring. He knows that you're probably going on Facebook to 
keep an eye on his activities, and he thinks he can block you out by not 
making you his friend. 

Fair enough, as far as it goes. But you still have a few options. 

Viewing Updates Without Being a Friend 

First, you may not even have to make your child a Facebook friend to view 
his Profile page and status updates. Many people configure Facebook's 
privacy settings so that all users can view their status updates. If your child 
is this negligent, you don't have to be a friend to read everything he posts. 
Just find and go to his Profile page, and read to your heart's content. It's 
worth a shot. 

Viewing Updates as a Friend of a Friend 

Let's assume, though, that if your child was smart enough not to accept 
your friend request that he's also smart enough not to set his status update 
viewing setting to "everyone." Your next hope is that, instead, he set the 
viewing status to "friends of friends." This could be your foot in the door. 

What you want to do now is find someone who you know is on your child's 
friends list. This might be a classmate, a cousin, the kid down the block, a 
guy on the football team, whatever. Just make sure that your child is on this 
person's friends list— look at the Friends box on that person's Profile page 
and see if your child's name is listed. 

Now, invite this friend of your child to be on your Facebook friends list. 
Chances are you'll be accepted, but if not you can try inviting another of 






What to Do If Your Kids Hide from You on Facebook 87 

your kid's friends. Just keep trying until you I " tl \ 

get on someone's friends list. ^ |\| f) t P 

After you are a friend of one of your child's 

The only downside to 
friends, go your kid s Facebook Profile page. If ... .... , 

' M ' K M tracking your child when 

he set the privacy levels to "friends of friends," you , re not an officia| friend 
you'll now be able to read all of his status is that his status updates 

updates, just as if you were a friend yourself. won't appear in your 

News Feed. You have 
rs. . . ,-s. . -. ■ ■ i . -. to manually access his 

Creating a Surreptitious Identity Profile pag y e t0 read his 

Some youngsters are savvy enough (and status updates. 

care enough about their privacy) to configure 

Facebook's privacy settings to display their 

status updates only to friends. Some are even savvier, and know how to 

block specific people— like you— from viewing their updates. What to do, 

then, if you find yourself locked out from your child's innermost Facebook 

postings? 

Your only recourse at this point is to reinvent yourself— as someone else. 
That is, you need to create a second Facebook account under a different 
name and identity. Instead of being a forty-something mother, you need 
to be a teenaged girl or a college-aged dude. In other words, you need 
to become someone that your child won't automatically think to block on 
Facebook. 

But wait— why would your child accept a friend request from a complete 
stranger, albeit one closer to their own age? Because, unfortunately, most 
teenagers and young adults have hundreds of Facebook friends, many of 
which they've never met in real life. They're friends of friends, acquain- 
tances, people they bumped into once in the hall between classes, folks 
who just happen to live nearby or go to the same school or work at the 
same company. For better or worse, younger users are accustomed to 
accepting friend requests without question, as long as there are no obvious 
"red flags" concerning the person making the request. So as long as you 
don't stand out as an old weirdo, chances are you can fake your way onto 
your child's friends list. 



88 



CHAPTER 6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 



Establishing a new identity does require some creativity, of course. First, 
you need to get the age right; within a year either side of your child's age is 
generally good. 

Next, the gender. Is your son more likely to accept a request from a pretty 
girl or a guy he's never met? (I'd bet on the girl.) Is your daughter more likely 
to accept a request from a cool girl or a good looking guy? (Not to be sex- 
ist, but this one is a tougher question; many girls are less questioning about 
Facebook girlfriends than they are guys they've never met.) 

You need to pick a new name, of course, something age appropriate. (That 
means something like "Colby" or "Dylan" instead of "Margaret" or "Bob.") 
Make sure the person you're inventing lives nearby; kids are less likely to 
make friends with people who live across the country. 

As to school, this is also a little tricky. If your child goes to a smaller school 
where everyone is likely to know everyone else, you probably don't want 
to say you go to that school, too; instead, pick a neighboring school where 
he doesn't know everyone. If your child goes to a larger school, however, 
particularly a large university, you can fake the school allegiance and no one 
will be the wiser. 



Then you need to fill in some personal infor- 
mation. The new person you're becoming 
should have a lot of the same likes and dis- 
likes as your child— television shows, movies, 
music, and such. If you don't know what your 
kid likes. ..well, shame on you. 

Finally, you need to have a second email 
address, one your child doesn't know about. It 
shouldn't be easily traceable to you— that is, it 
shouldn't include your real name in the email 
address. I recommend creating a new account 
at one of the big Web email services, such as 
Gmail or Hotmail, just for this purpose. 

After you've created this new account for your 
fictitious self, you should first seek out some 
of your offspring's friends and invite them onto 
your friends list. Don't start by making your 



ff?T^ 



You don't have to— and 
probably shouldn't— add 
a photo to your fake 
Facebook account. Not 
every Facebooker has 
a Profile picture, so the 
absence of such shouldn't 
be suspicious. On the 
other hand, choosing the 
wrong photo could set 
off warning alarms. Plus, 
where are you going to get 
the picture, anyway? You 
could get into more trouble 
ripping off someone else's 
photo than you could being 
found out by your child. 



Using Facebook to See What Your Kids Are Up To 89 

child your first and only friend; you need to establish your identity before you 
ingratiate yourself with your child. It helps if you have a handful of friends 
already established, then it looks kind of normal when you ask your child to 
join your friends list. 

After you're on the list, you don't have to— and probably shouldn't— interact 
with your child. Most Facebook friends are silent friends, so it won't look 
odd if you don't comment on your child's updates or make updates of your 
own. Just keep to the background and observe as best you can. 

Yes, it's spying, but you're a parent— you're entitled. 

Using Facebook to See What Your Kids Are 
Up To 

The whole point of using Facebook to keep tabs on your kids is to look and 
listen without doing a lot of talking. You kind of want your child to forget 
that you're there, so she'll let her guard down. If your child thinks that you're 
watching, she'll be careful about what she posts. If she forgets a parent is 
watching, she'll be a lot more free with what she says on the site. 

The main thing you want to do is read your child's status updates. Most 
young people on Facebook, for whatever reason, are surprisingly open 
about what they post; you'll get to see who your child is hanging out with, 
hear about her latest fight with her boyfriend, read about how much she 
hates her classes this semester or likes her new job or is creeped out by the 
guy who works at the Orange Julius stand at the mall. Your child's inner- 
most thoughts, both profound and mundane, will be there on her Wall for 
you to read. 

It's kind of like eavesdropping on a private conversation — except that it's a 
public conversation that anyone can listen to. It's not like spying, not really; 
it's more like stalking. After all, your child's status updates are there on 
Facebook for everyone to read. You just happen to be actively interested in 
reading everything your child posts. 

To be a successful parental Facebook stalker, however, you need to keep 
your presence someone muted. That is, you don't want to remind your child 
that you're reading what she writes. That means not commenting on your 



90 CHAPTER 6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 

child's posts. This may be the hardest part 

of the whole process; most parents have to /^^N fit P 

really restrain themselves from offering advice 

or support or consoling their kids when they Just because you shouldn't 

make a post. You can't do that. You just comment on your child's 

can't. You have to stay invisible on your status updates doesn't 

child's Profile page, so she doesn't know that mean that you carVt make 

new status updates on your 
you re there. „ ,., „. 

3 own Profile page. Chances 

If you can't resist the urge and do post are your child won't equate 
a comment to one of your child's status y° ur occasional post show- 
updates, let me tell you what is likely to hap- in 9 up in her News Feed 
,-. .... .... . . with the fact that you're 

pen. First, your child will become much less „. ' 

r ' , eyebalhng everything she 

open on Facebook; the number of posts she . online 

makes will drop dramatically. Then she'll 

get smart and figure out how to configure 

Facebook so that you — and you alone— can't read her status updates. Then 

she'll go back to posting frequently, but you'll never know because you 

won't be able to see a thing she posts. In other words, you'll have blown 

your cover. 

So heed my advice and, once you get inside, stay silent. Yes, you'll be listed 
as one of her Facebook friends, but you'll be one of those silent friends she 
soon forgets about. Out of sight, out of mind, if you want to stay in the loop. 

Using Facebook to Contact Your Grown 
Kids 

All this talk about snooping on your kids online really applies to younger 
kids— middle schoolers, high schoolers, college-aged kids. After your kids 
get a bit older and a lot more mature, your online relationship with them 
changes. Or should change, anyway. 

As your children move away from home and establish families of their own, 
finding the time to talk is a major challenge. Days, weeks, even months 
might go by where neither of you can find the time to phone. Here is where 
Facebook can be of real value. 



Using Facebook to Contact Your Grown Kids 91 

I " "^ 



ote 



When you add a grown child to your Facebook 

friends list, that child now is privy to all the 

status updates you make— and vice versa. 

This is a great way to keep each other Learn more about send- 

informed of all the little things happening in ing and receiving private 

your lives. messages in Chapter 

9, "Exchanging Private 
For more detailed information, take advantage Messages." 
of Facebook's private messaging system. This 
is like email for Facebookers, where you use 
Facebook to send longer messages back and 
forth. It's not quite the same as exchanging 
written letters, but it's better than not writing 
a ^ a "- Learn more about instant 

And if you both happen to find yourself online messaging in Chapter 

at the same time (check the Friends Online ' , a in ,p Wl 

u x Kids- Live." 

section of your Home page), you can use 

Facebook's chat feature to instant message in 

real time with your child. It's almost like talking in person! 






ote 



Tracking Personal Info 



The obvious thing to look at when you're snooping on (excuse me, 
observing) your child of Facebook is his status updates. These tell you 
what he's doing and thinking about at the moment. 

But you also want to pay attention to the personal information he sup- 
plies to the Facebook site, in particular what's on the Info tab on his 
Profile page. There are a number of things to look for here. 

First, it's always fun to observe your child's relationship status. Trust 
me, this might be the first place you learn that he's gotten a new girl- 
friend, or broken up with his old one. 

I also like to look at what the kid is watching and listening to these 
days. An odd change in listening habits, for example, might signal other 
changes in behavior. It's not a perfect indicator, by any means, but you 
can get a sense of how a child is leaning by the music he listens to and 
the movies he watches. 









92 CHAPTER 6 Keeping Tabs on Your Kids 



Finally, take a look at the contact information at the bottom of the Info 
tab. If there's any information there at all, it's time to break your cover 
and have a talk with your child. Your child should not, under any cir- 
cumstances, publicly list his or her phone number, mailing address, or 
email address. There should be no way for bad guys to contact your 
kids online, which means keeping all this contact information private. 
It's worth a few temporary bad feelings to keep your kids from putting 
too much of themselves online— and potentially putting themselves in 
harm's way. 



Chapter f 



Organizing Your Friends 
List 



After you've been on Facebook for any length of time, you'll 
find that you've added quite a few people to your friends list. 
Between old friends from your youth, current friends and co- 
workers, and assorted family members, you might end up 
with anywhere from a few dozen to a few hundred Facebook 
friends. Good for you! 

The problem with having so many friends on Facebook, 
however, is managing them. That's a lot of people to track 
in your News Feed, for example. It's also difficult to find that 
one individual friend you want to email or send a photo to; 
when you have an ever expanding friends list, locating one 
single friend is a little like finding a needle in a haystack. 

How, then, do you better manage the people on your friends 
list? There are ways, as I'll tell you next. 

Creating Friends Lists 

When it comes to managing large lists of friends, the key is 
to create custom lists within your main list. A Facebook list is 
simply a subset of your total friends list, organized however 
you wish. 

For example, you might want to create a list that contains 
only family members. Or you could create a list of people 
you currently work with. Or one that contains other members 
of a club or outside organization. You get the drift. 

When you have a custom list (or two or three), it's easy 
enough to find individuals on that list, or to send messages 



94 



CHAPTER 7 Organizing Your Friends List 



to all the members of the list. It's a lot easier to manage small lists of friends 
than it is to deal with all your friends at once. 

Here's how to create a custom list: 

1. Click the Account button on the Facebook toolbar and select Edit Friends 
from the pull-down menu. 

2. When the Friends page appears, click Friends in the Lists section of the 
sidebar. 

3. Facebook now displays the master list of all your friends, shown in Figure 
7.1 ; you create your new list from this master list. Do so by clicking the 
Create New List button. 



Create New List: 



I < I 



1 Dinah Lance 

1 LaJofe.cn 


Add to L'Bt t 


X 


H[ Lew Archer 


Add to List -r 


X 


1 Michael Mlchards 


Add to List v 


X 


HSqI Michael Miller 


Add to List ■» 




I a .1 Rudolfo Lasperi 

^ 1 Friend Request Pending 


Add to List -r 




Bv , Tom French 

Hh LaJolla.CA 


Add to List t 





Figure 7.1 . Your master Friends list. 

4. When the Create New List window appears, as shown in Figure 7.2, enter a 
name for the list into the Enter a Name box. 

5. Click those friends you want included in this list. You can select multiple 
people at the same time. 

6. Click the Create List button. 



That's it; your new list is now created. 



Editing Your Lists 



95 



r 


Create New List 




F5ff?jm?r?TTT!? 




FTl Selected (0] StarhTypmg*Nflmp 




Beach muse 

B 

id 

Surt" music 

Q 




Dinah Lance ■■ ■ Lew Archer 

M zhacl I'.llc" H Scuba divrig 

Surfing ^^^^E Svanniing 
Ml 


^ \ Tom French 










1 1 cancel 1 











Figure 7.2. Creating a new custom friends list. 



Editing Your Lists 



Your new list now appears in the Lists section of the sidebar on the Friends 
page. Figure 7.3 displays the lists that I've personally created, one for Family 
and one for Work. 



S Work 
£1 Family 
£j Pages 
<jl] SMS Subscriptions 



Figure 7.3. All your Facebook friends lists— including your master list (Friends) and 
the custom lists you've created. 



To add or delete members from a given list, follow these steps: 

1. Click the Account button on the Facebook toolbar and select Edit Friends 
from the pull-down menu. 

2. When the Friends page appears, go to the Lists section of the sidebar and 
click the particular list. 



96 



CHAPTER 7 Organizing Your Friends List 



3. Facebook now displays all members of the list, as shown in Figure 7.4. 
Click the Edit List button. 



Create New List Edit List Delete List 



Dinah Lance 

LaJolla, CA Work 



Lew Archer 

Work 



Figure 7.4. Viewing a custom friends list. 

4. When the Edit List dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 7.5, make sure 
the All button is selected. 







Work Edit Name 


^3 "-lerteH (3) 


Start Typing a Name 




: h :- : ■ muac 


1H9H 




^^^^^B '■' 


Ifl Michael Miller HJ Scuba diviia 


fcfl ::i2Ci 


■ ■ 


B~ 


^^ bjurfing ■■■■■I iwimmr| 9 


f ~\ TDm French 

■1 


■■■ im 




1 CdllLtll 









Figure 7.5. Editing the members of a custom friends list. 

5. Current members of the list are shown with their names selected. To 
remove someone from this list, click his or her name to deselect them. 

6. To add a new person to this list, click their name. 

7. Click the Save List button. 



You can also add people to any existing list from your master Friends list. 
Just display the Friends list and click the Add to List button to the right of 



Displaying Status Updates from List Members 97 

that person's name, as shown in Figure 7.6. This displays all existing lists; 
check the list to which you want to add this person. 



Family 
Wcrfi 



Create New List 



Figure 7.6. Adding a friend to a custom list. 

Likewise, you can remove a person from any list from the master Friends list. 
Just click the X List(s) button next to that person's name and uncheck the 
list from which you want to remove that person. You can also add that per- 
son to another list at the same time. 

Displaying Status Updates from List 
Members 

One of the uses of a custom friends list is to view status updates only from 
the members of that list. This way you can see what all your family members 
are up to, for example. 

To view the status updates of a custom friends list, follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Friends in the sidebar. 

2. When the next page appears, the Friends section of the sidebar also 
expands to show all the custom lists you've created, as shown in Figure 
7.7. Click the name of the list you want to view. 



jftj\ Friends 

RecentJy Updated 
Status Updates 
Vvc-rk 



Family 



Figure 7.7. Displaying status updates from the members of a custom friends list. 

Facebook now displays a News Feed of status updates from the members 
of this list. 



98 CHAPTER 7 Organizing Your Friends List 

Deleting Custom Lists 

If you create a custom list that you later feel is unnecessary, you can easily 
delete it. Follow these steps: 

1. Click the Account button on the Facebook toolbar and select Edit Friends 
from the pull-down menu. 

2. When the Friends page appears, go to the Lists section of the sidebar and 
click the particular list. 

3. Click the Delete List button near the top of the page, as shown in Figure 
7.8. 



CreateNew List Edit List Delete List 



Figure 7.8. Deleting a custom friends list. 
4. When prompted by the Delete List? dialog box, click the Delete List button. 



Getting Rid of Unwanted Friends 



While we're on the topic of managing your Facebook friends, what do you 
do about those friends who you really don't want to be friends with any- 
more? Maybe it's someone who's fallen off your radar, a co-worker who 
changed jobs, an acquaintance who's proven more annoying than friendly, 
or a black sheep family member you'd prefer to disown. Do you need to 
keep these people on your friends list forever? 

The answer, of course, is that you don't. You can, at any time, remove any 
individual from your Facebook friends list. This is called unfhending the per- 
son, and it happens all the time. In fact, the person you unfriend doesn't 
even know he's been ditched; you just get rid of them and that's that. 

Here's how to do it: 

1. Click the Account button on the Facebook toolbar and select Edit Friends 
from the pull-down menu. 

2. When the Friends page appears, go to the Lists section of the sidebar and 
click Friends. 



Blocking Unwanted Users 



99 



3. Go to the person you want to unfriend and click the X to the far right of his 
or her name, as shown in Figure 7.9. 



Michael Mich aids 



Figure 7.9. Click the X to remove an individual from your friends list. 



4. When prompted if you want to remove the 
connection, click the Remove button. 

That's it. The person is no longer your official 
Facebook friend. 

Blocking Unwanted Users 

Just because you remove someone as your 
friend doesn't mean that you become invis- 
ible to that person on Facebook. That person 
can still email you and, unless you alter your 
privacy settings, view certain content on your 
Profile page. 

If you think that someone is acting like a 
stalker, it might be best to completely block all 
contact from that person. You do this by add- 
ing this individual to what Facebook calls your 
block list. Individuals on this list cannot view 
your Profile page, send you private messages, 
or even find you in search of the Facebook site, 
yourself from online stalkers— or just people you 
again. 



L^Note 



You can, at any time, re- 
add an unfriended person 
as a friend. You just have 
to go through the whole 
invite-a-friend process 
again, no big deal. 



r+***b 

L^Note 

Learn more about deter- 
mining who can and 
can't view your personal 
information in Chapter 21, 
"Keeping Some Things 
Private." 






It's a great way to shield 
never want to hear from 



To block someone in this fashion, follow these steps: 

1. Click Account on the Facebook toolbar and then click Privacy Settings. 

2. When the Choose Your Privacy Settings page appears, go to the Block 
Lists section at the bottom of the page and click Edit Your Lists. 



1 00 CHAPTER 7 Organizing Your Friends List 

3. When the Block Lists page appears, as shown in Figure 7.10, enter that 
person's Facebook name into the Name box, or enter his or her email 
address into the Email box. 



Choose Your Privacy Settings* Block Lists 



^ Back to Privacy 



Block application invite: 



Once you block someone , that person can no longer be your friend on Facebook or interact with you {except within 
applications and games you both use). 



i Rudolfo Lasperi Unblock 



Once you block application invites from someone, you'll automatically ignore future application requests from that 
friend. To block invites from a specific friend, dick the Ignore All Invites From This Friend' link under your latest 
request. 



Block invites fronir Type the name of a friend.. 



You haven't blocked invites from anyone. 



Figure 7.1 0. Adding someone to your block list. 



4. Click the appropriate Block This User button. 



People you've blocked are now listed on the Block List page. To unblock a 
given individual, click the Unblock link next to his or her name. 



How Many Friends Is Too Many? 

Younger Facebook users tend to have more friends than do older users. 
I'm not quite sure why this is the case; after all, we've met a lot more 
people in our years than younger users have in their limited time walking 
this planet. 

Still, younger folks are more likely to use Facebook as the hub of their 
social interactions, and thus have lots of people on their friends list 
who they barely know, if they know them at all. Those of our genera- 
tion, being older and wiser and more discriminate, tend to avoid friend- 
ing mere acquaintances. Our friends lists are more likely to contain real 
friends. 



Blocking Unwanted Users 101 



That said, it's easy to build up a Facebook friends list that registers in 
the triple digits. I don't care how gregarious you are, it's unlikely that 
you have that many true friends. Really, take a look at your list— how 
many people on there really belong? 

Because we tend to accumulate Facebook friends much the same way 
as our yards accumulate dandelions, from time to time you might want 
to cull the pretenders from your list of friends. Does that neighbor two 
streets over really need to be there? Or the checkout lady from the 
supermarket? Or, for that matter, weird cousin Ernie? 

Sometimes who you let on your friends list is a matter of strategy. Take, 
for example, my stepdaughter, who is a nurse at a major metropolitan 
hospital. Her policy is to allow other nurses on her friends list, but not 
doctors or hospital administrators. To her thinking, her co-workers- 
people at her level — can be friends, but her bosses can't. Makes sense 
to me. 

You might want to develop similar strategies for deciding who you do 
or don't let onto your friends list. Maybe it's as simple as saying anyone 
who gets a Christmas card (or you get a Christmas card from) gets on 
the list. Or only those people you talk or write to once a year get on the 
list. Or people who work in your department, but not those who work in 
remote offices. You get to make the rules. 

The point is that even though Facebook is a social network, you don't 
have to network with everyone on the site. You can pick and choose 
those people you befriend — and sometimes a smaller circle of friends is 
better. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Part 

Keeping in Touch with 
Facebook 

8 Updating Your Friends on What You're 
Doing 

9 Exchanging Private Messages 

10 Chatting with Your Kids— Live 




This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter- Jj 



Updating Your Friends 
on What You're Doing 



We've talked a lot about Facebook being the perfect place to 
update your friends and family on what you're up to— things 
you're doing, thoughts you're thinking, accomplishments 
you're accomplishing, you name it. The easiest way to let 
people know what's what is to post what Facebook calls a 
status update. 

Every status update you make is broadcast to everyone on 
your friends list, displayed in the News Feed on their Home 
pages. This way everyone who cares enough about you to 
make you a friend will know everything you post about. And 
that can be quite a lot— from simple text posts to photos and 
videos and even links to other Web pages. 



What Is a Status Update? 



Quite literally, a Facebook status update is an update of your 
status. Yeah, that's self-defining, but in essence it's a way to 
describe what you're doing or thinking about at the moment. 
It's a snapshot into your life, posted as a short text on the 
Facebook site. 

A status update is, at its most basic, a brief text message. It 
can be as short as a word or two, or it can be several para- 
graphs long; that's up to you. (The official maximum limit is 
420 characters, or three times the length of a similar Twitter 
message.) 

Although a basic status update is all text, you can also 
attach various multimedia elements to your status updates, 
including digital photographs, videos, events, and links to 



106 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



other Web pages. You can also "tag" other 
Facebook users and groups in your updates, 
so that their names appear as clickable links 
(to their Profile pages, of course). 



L^Note 



Various Facebook appli- 
cations also let you attach 
application-specific items 
to your status updates. 
Learn more about these 
applications in Chapter 
18, "Finding Fun Games 
and Applications." 






The nice thing about a status update is that 
it's a post-once, read-many process. That is, 
a single status update is broadcast to all the 
people on your friends list. If you have 100 
friends, that's 100 people that read the single 
status update you posted. 

Status updates appear in multiple places on 
the Facebook site. First, your status updates appear on your own Profile 
page, newest at the top, on your Wall tab, as shown in Figure 8.1 . (Your 
most recent status update also appears at the very top of your Profile page, 
above the Publisher box, which is shown in Figure 8.3.) Your status updates 
also appear on your friends' Home pages, in their News Feeds, as shown in 
Figure 8.2. This way your friends are kept updated as to what you're doing 
and thinking. 



Tom French Funny things are happening today... = r-.-.-a^ ago dear 
Wall Info Photos + 



What's on your mind? 



Attach: g] ■£? [5] <fTj 



Tom French Funny things are happening today., 
a few seconds ago * Comment • Like 



C^ OptJoi 



Tom French I'm not sure, but I think that guy over there is looking at me 

funny 

a few seconds ago * Comment Like 

Tom French Come one come all and bring all your friends! 
Homecoming Party! 

Sunday, April ll r 20 10 at 7:00pm 
Bob's House 

[3? March /at^i^Hpm ■ Comment ■ Like Share 

Tom French I'm okay with most things, but you never really know. 

March 7 at 3 : 3 5pm ■ Comment ■ Like 



Figure 8.1 . Status updates on your Profile page. 



Where to Update Your Status 1 07 



CO News Feed 



Top News ■ Most: Recent 



What's on your mind? 



B 



Torn French Funny things are happening today... 

21 minutes ago ■ Comment ■ Like 



Tom French I'm not sure, but I think that guy over there is looking at 

me funny 

22 minutes ago ' Comment ■ Like 

Randy Ferguson and Scott Levendoski are now friends v./ith Tim 

Crouch. 

Jfcn, 42 minutes ago ■ Add as Friend 

Dustln Sullivan I didn't realize my Twitter/Facebook feeds would give 
me World Cup spoilers, says the man who has the USA match waiting 
on his DVR. :( 

a about an hour ago via Selective Tweets ■ Comment Like 



Figure 8.2. Status updates on a friends' Home page. 



Where to Update Your Status 



When you want to update your status, there are two different places you can 
do it. 

First, you can go to your Home page, at the top of which resides the box 
you see in Figure 8.3. This box, which initially has the words "What's on 
your mind?" inside, is officially called the Publisher box; it's also sometimes 
referred to as the Share box. In any instance, this box is one place to enter 
your updates; click the Share button to post a new status update. 



d News Feed 



Top News ■ Most Recent 



Attach: @ S" |S] fl t 



fl- 



Figure 8.3. The Publisher box at the top of your Profile page. 



You can also find a Publisher box at the top of your own Profile page. As 
you can see in Figure 8.4, it's the same box (save for a blue background 
around it) and works the same way. 



108 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



What's on your mind? 



Attach: ® ■&? [S] fl] ~ 



a- 



Figure 8.4. The Publisher box at the top of your Home page. 



By the way, you can also post status updates 
from your mobile phone, as a standard text 
message. Or, if you have a Facebook applica- 
tion for your iPhone or other smartphone, you 
can use that app to post your updates. 

How to Update Your Status 

Posting a status update is a relatively simple 
procedure. It can get a little more complicated, 
however, if you choose to attach a photo, 
video, event, or Web link to the basic text 
message. 

Posting a Simple Text Update 

Understandably, Facebook makes it extremely 
easy to post a status update. You have to be 
signed into Facebook, of course, but then you 
follow these simple steps: 

1. Navigate to the Facebook Home page or 
your personal Profile page. 

2. Type your message into the Publisher box 
at the top of the page. 

3. Click the Share button. 



GOcautio 



n 



Do not confuse these 
Publisher boxes with the 
very similar box found at 
the top of your friends' 
Profile pages. The box on 
a friend's page is used to 
post a message to that 
friend on that friend's 
Profile page only. What 
you post on a friend's 
page is not a regular sta- 
tus update, and does not 
make it into anyone else's 
News Feed. 






ote 



Learn more about posting 
to Facebook from your 
mobile phone in Chapter 
19, "Using Facebook on 
the Go." 






How to Update Your Status 1 09 



Attaching a Photo 

So far, so good. But what if you'd like to 
attach a photo to a status update? You can, 
you know; it's a great way to share a special 
photo with your friends, without them having 
to navigate to and through your photo albums. 
In this instance, you follow these steps: 

1. Begin by typing the desired text of your 
update into the Publish box at the top of 
the Home or Profile page. 

2. Click the Photos button to display a new 
Photos panel beneath the Publisher box, as 
shown in Figure 8.5. 



L^Note 

Any additions you make 
to your Facebook photo 
albums are automatically 
added to the Wall on your 
Profile page. Any single 
picture you post with a 
status update is automati- 
cally added to the Wall 
Photos album. (Unless 
you posted it from your 
mobile phone, in which 
case it ends up in the 
Mobile Uploads album.) 



^±] Photos 







Upload a Photo 

from your drive 



Take a Photo 

with a webcam 



Create an Album 

with many photos 



Figure 8.5. Getting ready to attach a photo to a status update. 



To use a photo stored on your hard drive, click Upload a Photo. When the 
panel changes, click the Browse or Choose Button; when the Open dialog 
box appears, navigate to and select the photo you want. Then click the 
Open button. 



4. To use a new photo taken with your com- 
puter's webcam, click the Take a Photo link. 
When the panel changes to display your live 
webcam, as shown in Figure 8.6, click the 
Photo button. 

5. Click the Share button to post your update. 



L^Note 

Learn more about upload- 
ing photos to Facebook 
in Chapter 1 1 , "Sharing 
Family Pictures." 



110 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



[rf] Photos 




&'- 



Figure 8.6. Using your webcam to create a photo for a status post. 



Attaching a Video 

You can also attach videos to your status 
updates. This is a great way to share your 
latest home movies, assuming you've saved 
them in or converted them to a digital file. 

Follow these steps: 

1. Begin by typing the text for your update 
into the Publisher box at the top of your 
Home or Profile page. 



[> 



Note 



You can upload video files 
up to 20 minutes in length 
and 1024 MB (approxi- 
mately 1 GB) in size. 



J 



2. Click the Video button to display a new Video panel beneath the Publisher 
box, as shown in Figure 8.7. 

3. To attach a video already recorded and stored on your computer, click 
the Upload a Video link. When the panel changes, click the Choose File or 
Browse button; when the Open dialog box appears, navigate to and select 
the video file. Then click the Open button. 

4. To attach a video recorded from your webcam, click the Record a Video 
link. When the panel changes to display a live picture from your webcam, 
as shown in Figure 8.8, click the Record button. Click the button again to 
end your recording. 



How to Update Your Status 111 



S" Video 







Record a Video 

with a webcam 



Upload a Video 

from your drive 



Figure 8.7. Getting ready to attach a video to a status update. 




Figure 8.8. Recording a webcam video to attach to a status update. 



5. Click the Share button to post your update. 

Attaching an Event 

If you're hosting a party, planning a community 
get-together, or just planning a dinner date, 
you can share notice of that event with your 
Facebook friends by attaching it to a status 
update. Here's how it works: 



L^Note 

Learn more about upload- 
ing videos to Facebook 
in Chapter 12, "Sharing 
Home Movies." 



112 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 

1. Begin by typing any accompanying text for the update into the Publisher 
box at the top of your Home or Profile page. 

2. Click the Event button to display a new Event panel beneath the Publish 
box, shown in Figure 8.9. 



[aT] Event 

ride: 
Location: 



□ 



Time: June H 1SQ 4:30 pm Q 



Figure 8.9. Creating an event attached to a status update. 



3. Type the name of the event into the Title 
box. 

4. Type where the event is hosted into the 
Location box. 

5. Pull down the time lists to select the start 
date and time of the event. 

6. Click the Share button. 



[> 



Note 



Learn more about 
Facebook events in 
Chapter 13, "Sharing 
Birthdays and Events." 






Attaching a Link to Another Web Page 

Here's something else you can add to a status update— a link to a particular Web 
page or article you like. Not only does Facebook add a link to the specified page, it 
also lets you include a thumbnail image from that page with the status update. 

Here's how it works: 

1. Begin by typing any accompanying text into the Publisher box at the top of 
your Home or Profile page. 

2. Click the Link button to display a new Link panel beneath the Publish box, 
as shown in Figure 8.10. 



How to Update Your Status 113 



£Q Link 







http:// 



Figure 8.10. Adding a Web link to a status update. 

3. In the Link box, enter the full Web address of the page you want to link to. 

4. Click Attach. 

5. When you are prompted to select a thumbnail image from this Web page 
to accompany your link, as shown in Figure 8.1 1 , click the left- and right- 
arrow buttons to cycle through the available images, or check the No 
Thumbnail option to include the link without an accompanying image. 




□ 



Michael Miller: The Molehill Group 

http : //www . molehillgroup . com/ 

Michael Miller is a best-selling writer who has authored more than 100 non- 
fictjon books over the past two decades, He is known for his casual, easy- 
to-read writing style and his ability to explain a wide variety of complex 
topics to an everyday audience .... 



2 of 12 C-: 



FH Ma Thumbnail 



Figure 8.1 1 . Choosing a thumbnail image for a Web link. 



6. Click the Share button. 



Tagging a Friend in a Post 

Sometimes you might want to mention one of your friends in a status 
update. Or maybe you want to include a shout out to one of the Facebook 
groups to which you belong. Well, there's a way to "tag" friends and groups 
in your status updates, so that the update includes a link to the tagged per- 
son or group, as shown in Figure 8.12. 



114 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



Michael Miller I think Sherry 'French Elliott' Miller is a great person 
I ' seconds ago ii ■ Comment Like 



Figure 8.12. A status update "tagged" with a clickable link to a particular person on 
the Facebook site. 



To tag a person or group in a status update, 
simply type an @ sign before you start to type 
the name. Don't add a space after the @ sign, 
but then begin to type the name directly after. 
As you type, Facebook will display a drop- 
down list with matching entries, as shown in 
Figure 8.13; select the friend or group from 
the list, then continue typing the rest of your 
update, as normal. 






ote 



Facebook lets you tag 
friends, groups, fan 
pages, events, and appli- 
cations. 






Hike spmlll 



Mar 

Mi 



Bob Miller 

IDeafiMBer 

Mark Hilfer 

Sherry 'French Elliott' Miller 
'It "' 



Figure 8.13. Tagging a friend in a status update. 

Anyone reading this status update will see the tagged entity as a blue, 
underlined text link. Clicking the link will display the Facebook page for the 
person or item you tagged. 



Determining Who Sees Your Status Updates 

By default, when you post a status update, Facebook displays it to every- 
one on your friends list. That's fine for most things you might post, but what 
if you're posting something more inflammatory or intimate— something you 
don't want everyone to see? 

We are now delving into the topic of Facebook privacy— who can see what. 
There are two ways to control who can see your status updates, and we'll 
discuss both here. 



Determining Who Sees Your Status Updates 115 

Setting Universal Status Privacy 

The first thing you can do is determine the general privacy setting for all 
your updates. That is, you can determine who can see all the updates you 
post. 

This is done via Facebook's privacy settings feature, which lets you control 
the privacy settings of dozens of different items. It's a little complicated, but 
we'll focus solely on the status updates settings. 

Follow these steps: 

1. From the Facebook toolbar, click Account and then click Privacy Settings. 

2. When the Choose Your Privacy Settings page appears, as shown in Figure 
8.14, go to the Sharing on Facebook section and click the Customize 
Settings link, under the big table. 



Choose Your Privacy Settings 



m Basic Directory Information 

To help real world friends find you, some basic information Is open to everyone. We also suggest setting basics like hometown 
and interests to everyone so friends can use those to connect with you. view settings 



Sharing on Facebook 










Everyone 
Friends of Friends 
Friends Only 

Recommended 




Everyone 


Friends of 
Friends 


Friends Only Other 


My status, photos, and posts 






- 


Bio and favorite quotations ■ 


Family and relationships • 


Photos and videos I'm tagged in 




■ 




Religious and political views 




- 




Birthday 




- 




Can comment on posts 






■ 


Email addresses and IM 






- 


Phone numbers and address * 


l/ Customize settings 






<^ This is your current setting. 



Figure 8.14. Getting ready to configure Facebook's privacy settings. 



When the Customize Settings page appears, as shown in Figure 8.15, go to 
the Posts by Me item (in the Things I Share section) and click the button to 
the far right. 



116 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



Thingslshare 


Posts b v me 


w^^^i 






• Everyone 






Fa mi I v 


Friends of Friends 
Friends Only 






Relationships 


Customize 









Figure 8.15. Determining who can view your status updates. 



4. 



By default, this button says Everyone— which means that everyone on the 
Facebook site, not just your friends, can view all your status updates. You 
can instead opt to display your updates to Friends Only (only people on 
your friends list can see them) or to Friends of Friends (your friends plus 
their friends). 

If you want to further limit who views your updates, click the button and 
select Customize. This displays the Custom Privacy dialog box, shown in 
Figure 8.16. You now have several options: 



■ 


Custom Privacy 


^i> Make this visible to 
These people: 






Fiends Only [rl| 


These people: 






Enter a Name or List 


1 












1 Cancel 





Figure 8.1 6. Displaying or hiding your updates from selected people. 



To hide your updates from everyone (but yourself), go to the Make This 
Visible To section, pull down the These People list, and select Only Me. 

To display your updates only to selected people, go to the Make This 
Visible To section, pull down the These People list, and select Specific 
People. You can then enter the names of the people with whom you 
want to share into the accompanying text box. 

To hide your posts from specific people (great for locking out your 
boss, your spouse, or people you don't like), go to the Hide This From 
section and enter the names of people you don't want to view your 
updates. 



Determining Who Sees Your Status Updates 117 



i" "1 

L^Note I 

If you belong to one or 
more networks, you can 
also opt to make your 
posts visible to members 
of those networks. You 
should see a Networks 
section in the Custom 
Privacy dialog box; pull 
down the list to select 
specific networks. 



After you've made your selections, click 
Save Setting to close the Custom Privacy 
dialog box. 

Setting Who Can View Individual 
Updates 

The previous process let you configure how 
your status updates are displayed in gen- 
eral—whether everyone, your friends only, or 
your friends and their friends can view all your 
status updates. You can also restrict the view- 
ing of your status updates on an update-to- 
update basis— that is, you can opt to display a 

specific update only to select individuals, or to hide it from selected people. 
This is a perfect way to hide certain thoughts and actions from people who 
you don't want knowing about them. 

To change the display settings for a specific status update, follow these 
steps: 

1. Begin by typing your update into the Publisher box at the top of the Home 
or Profile page. 

2. Click the Privacy button (looks like a padlock) next to the Share button. 

3. When the pop-up menu appears, as shown in Figure 8.17, select who you 
want to see this message: Everyone, Friends of Friends, or Only Friends. 



What's on your mind? 



Attach: ljl| "£• [3T] <£] 



Michael Miller It's a big v^eek for new relee 

book, THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO TH 
great guide for any working musician— or an 



• Everyone 

Friends of Friends 
Friends Only 
Customize 



C^ Options 



with musicians. Look for it at a bookstore near you, or order online from 



Figure 8.17. Selecting who can view a specific status update. 



4. If you want to show this message to or hide it from specific people on your 
friends list, select Customize from the pop-up menu to display the Custom 
Privacy window. To display the message only to certain people, pull down 



118 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 

the Make This Visible to These People list, select Specific People, and then 
enter your friends' names into the accompanying text box. To hide the 
message from certain people, enter their names into the Hide This from 
These People box. Click the Save Setting button when done. 

5. Click the Share button to post the status update to the people you 
selected. 



Deleting an Accidental Status Update 

By the way, if you change your mind about a status update you made, you 
can delete that post from Facebook. Here's how to do it: 

1. From your Profile page, scroll to the post you want to delete and point to 
the post until the Remove button appears, as shown in Figure 8.18. 

2. Click the Remove button. 

3. When the Delete Post confirmation window appears, click the Delete but- 
ton. 



Michael Miller Two-year old Hayley was up all night with bad dreams... Remove 
Hope she sleeps better tonight 
June 14 at 2: 52pm ■ Comment Like 



Figure 8.18. Deleting a status update. 



Deciding What to Write About 

When it comes to writing a status update, what qualifies as something 
worthwhile to post about? Unfortunately— and I really mean that— there are 
no rules or guidelines as to what's acceptable and what's not. So you run 
into a lot of useless drivel in your News Feed, along with useful updates and 
the occasional gem of an observation. 

Let me demonstrate, by listing a random sampling of status updates culled 
from my own News Feed. These are actual updates from my actual friends, 
although some of the details have been changed to protect the innocent. 



Deciding What to Write About 119 



Our a/c has not turned off all day. It is raining, but it is still 90+F. 

people have the swine flu and everyone wears a mask... millions have HIV 
and no one will wear a condom! Things that make you go Hmmmmm 

Do the community giving thing ...it's easy and does something positive. 

(John Smith) is nothing but salad for awhile, and protein bars. 

Thanks to the Gods of Caffeine and Sugar, without whom I'd be unable to 
function. 

Listening to a CD my daughter found— Fruta Madura by Vienta De Agua, 
blends bomba and plena two major genres of Afro-Rican music. Great 
latin dance music with a big brass section & lots of percussion. 

"Of course I'm ambitious. What's wrong with that? Otherwise you sleep all 
day." — Ringo Starr 

Please Lord, keep me mindful of my blessings, not on the things that have 
been taken from me 

(Jane Smith) is frantically trying to finish my overdue library book! 

Awake. Waiting for coffee. 

Oh great. Heat and Humidity. 

So. ..24 years of marriage has literally flown by! I have a wonderful hus- 
band and partner on this journey. 

pathetic excuse for a day... 

The cicadas have started. 

In Vermont, It is illegal for women to wear false teeth without the written 
permission of their husbands. 

Does everyone from Texas have Billy Bob somewhere in their name? 

Two-year old Hayley was up all night with bad dreams... Hope she sleeps 
better tonight. 

(John Smith) is going to see Craig Ferguson tonight! I'm excited, I was 
promised free chicken. 

We saw James Taylor and Carole King at the Xcel Center last night. 



120 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 

Simply one of the best concerts we've ever seen. Enough great songs to 
fill a 3-hour concert with two encores. 

(Jane Smith) doesn't trust cephalopods, and neither should you. 

Last night I dreamt in 5/4. 

First, note the variable grammar, spelling, and punctuation used; we'll dis- 
cuss this in the following section. But beyond that, observe the variety of 
what people think is noteworthy. There are interesting observations, heart- 
felt tributes, funny quotations, petty complaints, and mundane statements 
of activity. In short, you can post pretty much anything you want and you 
won't get a lot of complaints. 

That said, I can probably do without the more mundane observations. 
("Awake. Waiting for coffee.") I don't need to know when you woke up, 
when you ate lunch, when you're going to sleep, and that sort of thing. 
Maybe some people care, but most don't. 

It's better if you post on more interesting and unique topics. The fact that 
you went to a concert or read a book is interesting; it's even more interest- 
ing what you thought about it. 

Also interesting are major life events, such as anniversaries and graduations 
and such. Some thoughts from some people are interesting; other thoughts 
from other people aren't. Some posts are funny; some are poignant; some 
are just silly. Some are simply factual, some speculate. Some are intimate, 
embarrassingly so. And a lot are self-centered; if you don't know the per- 
son, you might not care at all. 

My point, then, is that there often is no point in what you post. You're 
updating your status, after all, and what's important to you might not be 
important to your friends. Try to keep a handle on that, and post about 
stuff your Facebook friends might be interested in. If you go too far outside, 
you might find your posts dropped from your friends' News Feeds, or even 
worse, get yourself unfriended. Not everyone cares about what you care 
about, after all; what you find interesting might not be interesting at all to 
anyone else. 



Employing "Facebook Grammar" 121 



Employing "Facebook Grammar" 



A Facebook status update is a lot longer than a Twitter tweet, if you're 
aware of the whole Twitter thing. But at 420 characters max, you can't really 
write volumes in your updates; you still have to edit your thoughts to fit 
within the allotted space. 

In addition, writing a Facebook status update is a bit like sending a text 
message on your cell phone. You do it quickly, without a lot of preparation 
beforehand or editing afterwards. It's an in-the-moment communication, and 
as such you can't be expected to take the time to create a grammatically 
perfect message. 

As such, status updates do not have to— and seldom do— conform to 
proper grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. It's common to abbrevi- 
ate longer words, use familiar acronyms, substitute single letters and num- 
bers for whole words, and refrain from all punctuation. 



L^Note 



For example, if you're posting about seeing 
your peeps (that's Facebook for "people") 
on Friday, instead of writing "I'll see you on 
Friday," you might post "C U Fri." You could It's also acceptable, at 
even forgo capitalization and post "cu fri." least to some users, to 
Facebookers, especially more seasoned ones, have the occasional mis- 
will know what you're talking about. spelling. It's not some- 
thing I personally like to 
To that end, you can use many of the same do or see, but I'm a pro- 
acronyms that have been used for decades fessional writer and pickier 
in text messaging, instant messaging, and about these things; most 
Internet chat rooms. Given that you're not a P eo P |e wi " let * slide if 

hip young communicator like your kids proba- y° u 9 et the spellina - wron 9 

, i . .. . , r ... ... I, .. once in a while 

bly are, you might not be familiar with all these 

online shortcuts. For your edification, then, I've 

assembled a short list of the most popular of 

these acronyms, which you'll find in Table 8.1. Use them wisely. 



122 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 



Table 8.1 Common 

Acronym 



Facebook Acronyms 

Description 





AFAIK 


As far as I know 


ASAP 


As soon as possible 


ASL 


Age/sex/location 


B/W 


Between 


B4 


Before 


BC 


Because 


BFN 


Bye for now 


BR 


Best regards 


BRB 


Be right back 


BTW 


By the way 


CU 


See you 


Cuz 


Because 


FB 


Facebook 


FTF 


Face to face 


FWIW 


For what it's worth 


FY I 


For your information 


GM 


Good morning 


GN 


Good night 


HTH 


Hope that helps 


IDK 


I don't know 


IM 


Instant message 


IMHO 


In my humble opinion 


IRL 


In real life 


JK 


Just kidding 


K 


Okay 


L8 


Late 


L8r 


Later 


LMAO 


Laughing my ass off 


LMK 


Let me know 



Employing "Facebook Grammar" 123 



Acronym 


Description 


LOL 


Laughing out loud 


NSFW 


Not safe for work 


OH 


Overheard 


OMG 


Oh my God 


Pis or Plz 


Please 


Ppl or peeps 


People 


R 


Are 


Rly 


Really 


ROFL 


Rolling on the floor laughing 


SD 


Sweet dreams 


Tht 


That 


Thx or Tnx 


Thanks 


TY 


Thank you 


TTYL 


Talk to you later 


U 


You 


Ur 


Your 


WTF 


What the f**k 


WTH 


What the hell 


YMMV 


Your mileage may vary 


YW 


You're welcome 


Zzz 


Sleeping 


Armed with these helpful shortcuts, U should be able to FB with all the 
young ppl. Of course, YMMV. BFN. 



How Often Is Enough? 



How often should you update your Facebook status? That's an interest- 
ing question, without a defined answer. 

Some of my Facebook friends post frequently— several times a day. 
Some only post occasionally, once a month or so. Most, however, post 
once a day or once every few days. So if there's an average, that's it. 



124 CHAPTER 8 Updating Your Friends on What You're Doing 

Some of the more frequent posters are justified, in that they post a 
lot of useful business information. Others I find more annoying, in that 
their posts are more personal and less useful; every little tic and burp is 
immortalized in its own update. That's probably posting too much. 

On the other hand, my friends who only post once a month or so prob- 
ably aren't trying hard enough. I'd like to hear from them more often; 
certainly they're doing something interesting that's worth posting about. 
After a while, I tend to forget that they're still around. 

So you need to post often enough that your friends don't forget about you, 
but not so often that they wish you'd just shut up. I suppose your update 
frequency has something to do with what it is you're doing, and how inter- 
esting that is. But it's okay to post just to let people know you're still there- 
as long as you don't do so hourly. 



Chapter M 



Exchanging Private 
Messages 

The whole goal of Facebook and social networking is to... 
well, to network socially. And, in this context, socially means 
publicly, which is where we get Facebook's very public sta- 
tus updates and Wall postings and the like. 

But what if you see an old friend online and want to drop 
a more private note? What if you have something to say 
that you don't want the whole world to see? Do all your 
Facebook communications have to be public ones? 

The answer, of course, is no; Facebook doesn't force you 
into all-public communication. There's a way to send private 
messages on Facebook, which is how you establish more 
personal relationships with your friends. 

Understanding Facebook's Private 
Messages 

It's not that Facebook doesn't like private messages between 
its users. It's that the Facebook community grows and ben- 
efits when communication is more public. A public status 
update or Wall posting goes into the Facebook system, 
where it's searchable and viewable by others, which leads 
to more connections and more communication. (It also helps 
Facebook target its ads to you, but that's another story— or 
is it?) 

Despite its preference for public communication, Facebook 
does provide a couple of different methods for private com- 
munication. As you learn in the next chapter, Facebook 



1 26 CHAPTER 9 Exchanging Private Messages 

offers an instant messaging service for real-time communication between 
users. It also offers a more traditional email system, which is what we're dis- 
cussing in this chapter. 

Facebook's email system is a private one. That is, you can email other 
Facebook users and your emails are delivered via the Facebook website. It's 
all member-to-member communication, facilitated by Facebook. 

These Facebook emails aren't called emails, of course; that would be too 
easy. Instead, Facebook calls them messages. (Not to be confused with 
instant messages— which Facebook calls "chat.") In essence, you can use 
Facebook's email system to send private messages to anyone on your 
friends list. 

These messages are just like those messages you send with any other email 
program or service. And, like traditional email (and unlike Facebook status 
updates), your Facebook messages are totally private, viewable only by you 
and the person you're corresponding with. 

As such, Facebook messages are the preferred way to talk about more pri- 
vate stuff with your friends. If you want to dish on the details of a mutual 
friend's divorce, do it via private message, not via public status updates. 
Same thing if you want to talk trash about your job or your spouse or some- 
one you both know. If it's something that not everyone should know, then 
take it private. 

It's Just Like Email — Except It Isn't 

Okay, I know I just said that Facebook's messages are just like traditional 
email. Except that's not exactly true; there are some important differences 
you need to be aware of. 

The first big difference concerns attaching photos. Unlike traditional emails, 
where you can attach any number of photos to a message, Facebook only 
lets you attach one photo per message. So if you want to share a bunch of 
photos, you'd have to send multiple messages. A real pain, if you can imag- 
ine. 

Then you have videos. Although you can attach any video file to a traditional 
email message, you can't do that with a Facebook message. You can shoot 
a new webcam video to attach to a message, but you can't attach an exist- 



Reading and Replying to Messages 127 

ing video file to a message. That's a strange limitation. 

Speaking of limitations, just try attaching any other type of file to a 
Facebook message. You can't. That's right, Facebook doesn't allow you to 
attach Word files, Excel files, MP3 files, you name it. You can attach one 
photo file or your newly recorded webcam video file, and that's it, nothing 
else. 

All of which adds up to the fact that you really can't use Facebook to send 
files to your friends and family. If that's what you want to do, stick with tra- 
ditional email. 

Reading and Replying to Messages 

Even with these limitations, using Facebook's email system is similar to 
using any other email program or service. You receive messages from oth- 
ers in your inbox; you can then read, reply to, or delete these messages. 

You access the contents of your inbox by clicking Messages on the 
Facebook toolbar. A list of your most recent messages displays, with the 
first line or so of each message visible, as shown in Figure 9.1. Click any 
message to read it in full; click the See All Messages link to view all the 
messages in your inbox. 



B 



Tom Frencl 

Edit My Profil 



rj Welcome 
BO News Feed 
n^l Messages 1 
HH Events 
[{±] Photos 
jj\ Friends 



Messages 



Send a New Message 



Bob Miller 

Project deadlines Torn, do you know what the deadli.. 



Michael Miller 

Dinner on Friday? Hey Tom, are and Wanda free for.. 



See All Messages 

2 unread 



Figure 9. 1. Viewing recent messages from the Facebook toolbar. 



By the way, if you have a new, unread message in your inbox, Facebook dis- 
plays a red number beside the Messages button on the toolbar, as shown in 
Figure 9.2. The number indicates how many unread messages you have. So, 
for example, if you have a single unread message in your inbox, you see the 
number "1 ;" if you have three unread messages, you see the number "3." 



1 28 CHAPTER 9 Exchanging Private Messages 



Figure 9.2. The red number by the Messages button indicates how many unread 
messages you have waiting. 

To read or reply to a message, follow these steps: 

1. Click the Messages icon on the toolbar to see the messages in your inbox. 
New messages are shaded. 

2. To read a message in full, click that message. 

3. To view all the messages in your inbox, click See All Messages. Your entire 
inbox displays, as shown in Figure 9.3. Click any message to read it. 



£1 Messages | Search Messages QA | + Mew Message | 



Mark as 


Jnread Report Spam 




Delete 




SelKfcAl 


Read, 


Jone 






• 1 


■ 


Bob Miller 

June IS at 4:22pm 







Show: ^^J| Unread 

Project d ead lines 

Tom, do you know 'what the deadlines are for the Zephyr project? I can't seem. . . 

J| Michael Miller_ Dinner on Friday? 

^ J.-t IE =:-:!":■-- Hey Tom, are and Wanda free for dinner this Friday? Love to get together with... 



Figure 9.3. Viewing all the messages in your inbox. 

4. The message you clicked is now displays in its own page in your Web 
browser, as shown in Figure 9.4. Scroll down to read the entire message. 

5. To respond to the message, enter your response into the Reply box. 

6. If you want to attach a photo, video, or event to this reply, click the appro- 
priate button under the Reply box. (More on this in a moment.) 

7. Click the Reply button. 



Deleting Messages 129 



rp Project deadlines 



Search Messages 



+ New Message 



^ Back to Messages Mark as Unread Report Spam Delete 



=tv een You and Bob Miller 



n Bob Miller June 13 at 4: 22pm 

1 Tom, do you know what the deadlines are for the Zephyr project? I can't seem 
^^^H to find them in my notes 


Reply: 






Attach: 


st •;■ -i 






| 4 Back to H 


=ssa<H= | | A | T | 





Figure 9.4. Reading and responding to an email message. 



Deleting Messages 



You can, at any time, delete old or unwanted 
messages from your inbox. Here's how to do it: 

1. Go to your Facebook Home page and click 
Messages in the sidebar. Your message 
inbox displays. 

2. To delete an individual message, click the X 
to the right of the message. 

3. To delete multiple messages, check the 
messages you want to delete, as shown in 
Figure 9.5 and then click the Delete button 
above the message list. 



Markas Unread Report Spam Delete 



Selecb All, Read, None 



Bob Miller 



Michael Miller 

:li* IS at 4: 17pm 



r&Ti^ 



v: 



Facebook's closed email 
system is pretty good at 
blocking junk email mes- 
sages, but occasionally 
some spam gets through 
the filters. To report a given 
message as junk email to 
Facebook, check the mes- 
sage in your inbox and 
then click the Report Spam 
button. 



Figure 9.5. Deleting multiple messages from your inbox. 



1 30 CHAPTER 9 Exchanging Private Messages 

Sending a New Message 

Naturally, you can also send new email messages to anyone on your friends 
list. Here's how to do it: 

1. Click Messages on the Facebook toolbar and then click Send a New 
Message. (Alternatively, you can go to your message inbox and click the 
New Message button.) 

2. When the New Message window appears, as shown in Figure 9.6, start to 
enter the name of the recipient into the To box. 





New Message 








,«■. 












Subject 












Mestage: 










Attach: 


IS V £D || Canrri 









Figure 9.6. Sending a new message. 



3. Facebook automatically displays the names of friends who match what you're 
typing, as shown in Figure 9.7. Select the desired recipient from this list. 



subject 




Mictad Michartfc 



Figure 9.7. Facebook tries to determine who you're emailing to; select a name from 



the list. 

4. You can send a message to multiple 
recipients. Repeat Step 3 to add other 
recipients to your list. 

5. Type a subject for this message into the 
Subject box. 



rt3 



<<Tip 



a 



You can send Facebook mes- 
sages to any Facebook member, 
whether they're on your friends list 
or not. You can also send mes- 
sages to people not on Facebook, 
simply by entering that person's 
email address into the To box. 



Adding Attachments to a Message 131 

6. Type your message into the Message box. 

7. Click the Send button. 

Adding Attachments to a Message 

As with traditional email, you can attach a photo, video, or Web link to any 
message you send. We look at each type of attachment in turn. 



Attaching a Picture 

To attach a digital photograph to a message, follow these steps: 

1. Start a new message, as previously discussed. 

2. Click the Photo button in the Attach section of the New Message window. 
The window expands, as shown in Figure 9.8. 




To: 
iubjecc 
Message: 



m 







upload a Photo 

from your drive 



Take a Photo 

with a webcam 



Canted 



Figure 9.8. Attaching a photo to a private message. 

3. To attach a photo stored on your computer, click the Upload a Photo link. 

4. This changes the window yet again; click the Choose File button. 

5. When the Open window appears, navigate to and select the photo you 
want to attach and then click the Open button. 

6. Back in the New Message window, finish entering your message and then 
click the Send button. 



1 32 CHAPTER 9 Exchanging Private Messages 

Attaching a Video 

Facebook enables you to record a new video, using your computer's web- 
cam, and attach that video to a private message. You cannot, however, 
attach a previously recorded video file to a message. 

To record and attach a webcam video, follow these steps. 

1. Start a new message, as previously discussed. 

2. Click the Video button in the Attach section of the New Message window. 

3. The window expands to display a live picture from your webcam, as 
shown in Figure 9.9. Click the red record button to begin recording. 



To: 
Subject 
Message: 



'$? Video 



n 




Figure 9.9. Recording a webcam video to attach to a private message. 



4. Click the stop button to stop recording. 

5. To view the video you just recorded, click the Play button. 

6. If you don't like the video you recorded, click the Reset button and then 
redo Steps 3 and 4 to make a new recording. 



Adding Attachments to a Message 133 

7. When you're done recording, finish entering your message and then click 
the Send button. 



Attaching a Web Link 

Facebook also lets you link to other websites 
from a private message. Actually, you can only 
include one such link within a given message; 
that's a bit limiting, if you're used to including 
links in traditional emails. Still, it's better than 
not being able to link at all. 

Here's how you do it. 

1. Start a new message, as previously dis- 
cussed. 



L^Note 

You can also type URLs 
in the body of your mes- 
sage, but unless you 
include the full "http://" 
thing at the beginning, the 
link won't be clickable. 






2. Click the Link button to expand the window, as shown in Figure 9.10. 



New Message 



To: 
Subject 
Message: 



£Ji 







http:// 



| Caned | 



Figure 9. 10. Attaching a Web page link to a private message. 



3. Enter the URL (Web address) of the page you want to link to into the box 
and then click the Attach button. 

4. Facebook now displays a bit of text about the linked-to page, as shown 
in Figure 9.1 1 . If the page includes graphics, you can then choose which 
thumbnail image from the page you want displayed in your message. If 
you'd prefer not to display a thumbnail image, check the No Thumbnail 
option. 



1 34 CHAPTER 9 Exchanging Private Messages 



New Message 



To: 
Subject: 



fl 




Mike and Sherry's Fa miry Pictures 

J 1 LLjK/^nikedi :dil ki i ypiLUJi ci .bluyipu-L. Luny' 
Hayley, Collin, and Amy in the cab ota moving van. 

"C'_ I =.\--Jl:.'I ' ziL'l'L i -lU-zU JUJoL.I! rjlltr, =■ IL 

the nice driver let everybody iito the truck to check it 
out.) 



IS of 26 I::^ 



~ Pin Thumbnail 



Cancel 



Figure 9.11. Choosing a thumbnail image to display with the link. 



5- Finish writing your message and then click the Send button. 



Writing Wall-to-Wall 



Facebook's email messages are what you want to use when you need 
totally private communication with a friend. Don't confuse these private 
messages with the public messages you can write on a friend's Wall on 
his Profile page. 

And it's easy to get confused, especially when you start carrying on 
what Facebook calls a Wall-to-Wall conversation. This simply a string 
of messages and replies on a friend's Wall. You start by posting a 
message on his Wall, as discussed in Chapter 5, "Visiting Friends and 
Family on Facebook." Your friend replies to your message, which then 
shows up your Wall. (And on his, too, of course.) You reply to that 
reply, he replies to that one, and you have a whole string of messages 
back and forth. 



Adding Attachments to a Message 135 

That's well and good, but don't be tricked into thinking these messages 
are only between the two of you. Any person who is a friend of both of 
you (and you're sure to have a few of these mutual friends) will be able 
to read all of these Wall-to-Wall posts. So it's not a private communica- 
tion, it's still a very public one. 

Knowing that, Facebook does provide a way for you to view an entire thread 
of Wall-to-Wall messages between you and a friend. Simply go to one of 
the messages from your friend on your own Profile page, and click the See 
Wall-to-Wall link. This displays a new page titled something like "My Wall- 
to-Wall with John Smith," or whomever your friend is. This page displays all 
the messages between the two of you in one place, and only those mes- 
sages. It's a good way to keep track of a longish conversation — even it if is 
a public one. 



This page intentionally left blank 



^^■|0 



Chatting with Your 
Kids— Live 



In the previous chapter we discussed one way to communi- 
cate privately with friends and family online, via Facebook's 
email message system. Communicating via email can be 
slow, however, especially if the person you're writing to 
doesn't check her messages all that often. 

If you want a more immediate means of communication, 
check out Facebook's live chat feature. This lets you com- 
municate in real time with your friends, using one-to-one text 
messages. Like email messages, these are totally private 
communications; no one but you and the person you're talk- 
ing to can read them. 

What's Chat -and Who Uses It? 

Okay, so here's the deal. What Facebook calls "chat," every- 
body else in the world calls instant messaging. You might or 
might not be familiar with instant messaging (or what those in 
the know call IM), but I guarantee your kids know what it is. 

Understanding Instant Messaging 

Instant messaging is like text messaging with your computer 
instead of your phone, and it's widely used by the younger 
generation. In fact, I'd bet big numbers that your kids already 
use instant messaging of one flavor or another. 

And there are several flavors of instant messaging— that 
is, several different IM services. The most popular of these 
are Yahoo! Messenger, AOL Instant Messenger (AIM), ICQ, 



138 CHAPTER 10 Chatting with Your Kids -Live 



Google Talk, Windows Live Messenger, and 
Skype. In general, these IM services don't talk 
to each other; you can only talk to other peo- 
ple who use the same service you do. 

In reality, most younger users subscribe to 
more than one IM service. (All of them are free 
to use.) Yahoo! Messenger (YM) and AIM are 
the two most popular IM services, especially 
with those in their teens and twenties. It's 
common to find both YM and AIM windows open 
multiple conversations taking place between your 
his or her friends. 






ote 



Skype is best known for 
its Internet-based tele- 
phone service, but also 
offers instant messaging 
between users. 






on a kid's computer, with 
kid and a dozen or so of 



Welcome to Facebook Chat 

Facebook's chat works just like these more 
traditional IM services, but is exclusive to 
Facebook users. It runs within your Web 
browser only when you're logged into the 
Facebook site; it's well integrated with the 
Facebook interface. 



[> 



Note 



If you happen to sub- 
scribe to the AOL Instant 
Messenger (AIM) ser- 
vice, you can talk to your 
Facebook friends directly 
from the AIM program 
window. 






As such, Facebook chat lets you carry on real- 
time conversations with any of your Facebook 
friends who are also logged onto the site. 
Obviously, you can't talk with someone who 

isn't logged on. But as long as a friend is online in Facebook at the same 
time you are, you can chat to your heart's delight. 

Chatting, by the way, consists of sending and receiving sequential text mes- 
sages to and from your friend. It's not a video chat and there's no audio 
involved; it's a text only thing. It's pretty much like sending and receiving 
one text message after another on your cell phone, except that the entire 
thread of the conversation appears in a single chat window— which makes it 
easier to keep track of who's saying what. 

Knowing this, you shouldn't get Facebook chat confused with web-based chat 
rooms. (And if you don't know what a chat room is, ask your kids). Despite the 
similar names, Facebook chat is purely a one-to-one conversation; you can't 



Who's Online to Chat With? 1 39 

have a multiple-person chat, as you can in a chat room on another site. A 
Facebook chat is between you and a single friend only. 

That said, you can conduct multiple chats at the same time. That is, you can 
have one chat window open to talk with your friend John, another to chat 
with your daughter, and a third to chat with your boss. But these are three 
separate chats; your friend, your daughter, and your boss can't interact with 
each other. (Unless they open up separate chat windows to each other, of 
course.) You're talking to each one individually, not collectively. 

Who's Chatting with Whom? 

So who uses this chat thing, anyway? 

Not surprisingly, Facebook chat is heavily used by younger members, and 
less so by older ones. It's much the same as with text messages on your 
cell phone; kids do it more often than their parents. 

This means, of course, that Facebook chat could be a great way to actually 
get some face time with your kids. You can't get them to talk at the dinner 
table (assuming they even come to dinner anymore), you can't get them to 
return email messages (they might not even use their email accounts), but 
you can probably get them to answer a chat request. They're online seem- 
ingly 24/7, always have Facebook open in their browsers, and are comfort- 
able doing the chat thing. It's second nature to them, so you might as well 
take advantage of it. 

Not that you want to overdo it, of course; you never want to push things too 
hard with your kids. But when you need to talk to your kids, you should see 
if they're online and, if so, ask them to chat with you. Now, an exchange 
of short text messages will never be confused with a heartfelt face-to-face 
conversation, but it's better than nothing. You'd be surprised how willing 
your children will be to "talk" with you in this fashion; it's because you're 
meeting them on their own ground. 

Who's Online to Chat With? 

To chat with someone, both of you have to be online and signed into the 
Facebook site. How do you know, then, which of your friends are available 
to chat? 



140 CHAPTER 10 Chatting with Your Kids -Live 

The first place to look is on your Facebook Home page. At the bottom of 
the left sidebar, as shown in Figure 10.1, is a box that says Friends Online. 
As you might suspect this box lists those of your friends who are currently 
online and logged onto Facebook. 



Friends Online 

^ Ce Wells • 

tef Ginger Foreman Wil... * 

| :. Smoke '.Vallm L 

| JeffTaylor t 

WM RJckKyghen L 

Terry Dwyer t 

Bj Tom French t 
See All 

Figure 10.1. The Friends Online box. 

Or at least some of them. Unfortunately, this isn't quite a complete list. I'm 
not even sure how Facebook puts this list together. Is it your most favorite 
friends? (And if so, how does Facebook know?) Is it the friends you com- 
municate with most often? I don't know. But I do know this little box doesn't 
always show me everyone who's available to chat. 

Instead, you want to display the more complete chat list that pops up from 
the bottom corner of every Facebook page. You can display this list by click- 
ing the See All link in the Friends Online box, or just by clicking the big Chat 
button thingie at the bottom right of the browser window. 

However you do it, you end up displaying the Chat panel shown in Figure 
10.2. This displays a full list of online friends, organized by the custom 
friends lists you create. Your custom lists appear first, with everybody not in 
a list appearing in the Other Friends section. So, for example, if you've cre- 
ated a custom list of family members labeled Family, online family members 
would appear first in the Family section. 

Within each separate list, your online friends are organized into two sections. 
At the top of each list are friends who have a full green circle by their names; 
these friends are online and active, which means they're already chatting 
with someone else. Beneath these names are those with a blue half-moon by 
their names. These friends are online but idle, which means they're available 
to chat but not chatting yet. 



Doing the Chat Thing 1 41 



!:: Friend Lists 4 Options 




Work 


cm 


Bl i Tom French 


# 


Family 

jjBj Laura Elliott 
Oitisr FriEnds 


CM 

* 

cm 


[* Cheryl Jackson Len . . . 


* 


H Jim Ca talano 


* 


■j Kathleen Kinley 


* 


H Bob Miller 


t 


M Ginger Foreman Wil... 


i. 


r^j J. Smoke VVallin 


t 


Hj Rick Kughen 


t 


Terry Dwyer 


V 


1* Chat [10] 



Figure 10.2. The Chat panel, which displays all of your online friends; those who are 
actively chatting have a green circle next to their names. 

You can open a chat with anyone listed in the Chat pane, whether they're 
currently active or idle. 



Doing the Chat Thing 



When you want to start chatting with someone, it's a relatively simple pro- 
cess. Here's how it works: 



1. 



2. 



Click the Chat button at the bottom right of any Facebook page, or click 
See All in the Friends Online box in the sidebar on the Home page. This 
opens the full Chat panel. 



Click the name of the person you want to 
chat with. This opens a new chat panel for 
this person, as shown in Figure 10.3. 

3. Type a text message in the bottom text 
box and press Enter on your computer key- 
board. 

Your messages, along with your friend's 
responses, appear in consecutive order within 
the chat panel. Continue typing new messages 
as you wish. 



L^Note 

When another user invites 
you to chat, you hear a 
short sound and see a 
new chat panel for that 
person open up on your 
Facebook page. Start 
typing to reply to your 
friend's initial message. 






142 CHAPTER 10 Chatting with Your Kids- Live 



/"~v 






nl 






Clea* Chat History 


He 

Hello, Tommy boy 


4i32pm 


Torn 

Whafs up r Mikey? 


4:33pm 


Tom 

Can you believe this weather? 




P Great, isn't it? 


iffi 


Torn French » 


X 



Figure 10.3. Chatting in real time with a Facebook friend. 



It's pretty simple, really. You open a chat panel, you start typing, and that's 
that. When you're done chatting, you can close the chat window by clicking 
the X at the top of the panel. 

By the way, you can display your chat in a larger window if you like. All you 
have to do is open the main Chat panel, click the Options button, and click Pop 
Out Chat. This opens a new Chat window, like the one shown in Figure 10.4. 



i httpr//www.f ace book, com/ - Facebook | Facebook Chat - Windows Internet Exploi 



■- a |- .:. | 



::: Friend Lists 4 Options 



| Michael Miller 
j Bob Miller 



.1 



JH Michael 

^^■ j Hello, Tommy boy 


•KB" 


JUp, What's up, Mikey? 


«*" 


P» Can you bslieve this WEather? 


**" 



Michael 

Great, isn't it? 



^?You bet. 



Michael Miller* x 



Figure 10.4. Chatting in a larger Chat window. 



Managing Your Chat Settings 143 

There's nothing really special about this, other than it's a bigger chat space 
than you have on the normal Facebook page. To close this Chat window 
and return to the normal Chat panel, click the Options button and select Pop 
Out Chat. 

Managing Your Chat Settings 

There are a handful of settings you can configure for your Facebook chat 
sessions. You get to them by clicking the Options button in the Chat panel. 

Here's what you find, as shown in Figure 10.5: 

• Go Offline. Click this if you don't want to chat while you're browsing the 
Facebook site. You're still logged on, but your friends don't know you're 
there. To return to online status, just click the Chat button at the bottom of 
the browser window. 

• Re-Order Lists. This lets you change the display order of your custom 
friends list in the Chat panel. Click this option and then drag and drop your 
lists into whatever position you like. 

• Pop-Out Chat. As described previously, this opens your chat panel into a 
larger chat window. 

• Play Sound for New Messages. This one is checked "on" by default. 
Uncheck it to not play a sound when you get a new chat request. 

• Keep Online Friends Window Open. Check this option to keep the Chat 
panel displayed, even when you return to the underlying Facebook page. 

• Show Only Names in Online Friends. By default, Facebook displays a small 
thumbnail picture of each person who's online. Check this option to dis- 
play names only with no photos. 

In addition, you can select which of your custom friends lists to display in 
the Chat panel. Click the Friend Lists button and check those lists you want 
to display; uncheck those you don't want to see. 



144 CHAPTER 10 Chatting with Your Kids -Live 







i him. 


Chat - 




:!■ Friend Lets F 




O Go Offline 
It Re-order Lists 
\S Pop out Chat 


cm 
* 

cm 
* 

* 
* 


[71 Play Sound for New 
Messages 

| | Keep Online Friends 
Window Open 

| | Show Only Names in 
Online Friends 


I mz.""""^ w 





Figure 10.5. Configuring Facebook's chat options. 



Chatting Versus Private Messages 

When it comes to talking privately with someone on Facebook, which 
should you use: The chat feature or private messages? 

It kind of comes down to who you're talking to and why. If it's someone 
you don't talk to that often, or you have something long to say, use 
private messages. If it's someone you see all the time and just need to 
drop a short note— and they're online, of course— use chat. 

The online thing is important. You can't chat with someone who isn't 
there. You can, however, send a message to someone who's not online 
at the time. They'll read your message the next time they log onto 
Facebook— which might not be today, and might not be tomorrow. 

You can be sure, however, of getting your message across to someone 
who's online now and willing to chat. That makes chat ideal for talking 
to and collaborating with colleagues during work hours. 

Chat is also good for talking to younger friends and family members, like 
your own children. They're likely to be on Facebook all hours of the day and 
night, which makes them uniquely available to chat. And, because it's more 
difficult to ignore a chat request than it is a message dumped in their inbox, 
you're more likely to actually connect with them. Which, knowing kids these 
days, is a big deal. 



Part |V 



Sharing Your Life on 
Facebook 

11 Sharing Family Pictures 

12 Sharing Home Movies 

13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 



This page intentionally left blank 



Cliapter 1 1 



Sharing Family Pictures 

Here's something that I find somewhat amazing: Facebook 
is one of the largest photo-sharing sites on the Web. Nothing 
against Flickr or Shutterfly, but it's Facebook that more and 
more people are using to share their photos with friends and 
family. 

Why is this? It's because Facebook is such a big commu- 
nity, period. It's also because Facebook makes it so easy to 
upload and share photos. Bottom line, if you're on Facebook 
and your friends and family are also, then Facebook is as 
good a way as any to give everyone a peek at your pictures. 

What's Good -and What's Bad- 
About Sharing Photos on Facebook 

Facebook is a social network, and one of the ways we con- 
nect socially is through pictures. We track our progress 
through life as a series of pictures, documenting events small 
and large, from picnics in the backyard to family vacations 
to births and graduations and weddings and everything else 
that transpires. 

People of our age have collected a lot of pictures over the 
years, dating back from our childhoods through our chil- 
dren's childhoods and possibly to their children's childhoods. 
In my own household, we have literally tens of thousands of 
pictures, most in digital format now (either shot that way or 
scanned in), starting with my own baby pictures (and those 
of my wife, of course) and ending with pictures we shot yes- 
terday of the grandkids. We're always taking new pictures, 
and love to share them with other family members. 



148 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 

Sharing pictures is also a great way for old friends to catch up on what 
we've been doing in the intervening years. It's fun to see pictures of friends' 
kids and grandkids; it's not quite the same as being there, but it certainly 
helps. 

Facebook Photos: The Good 

All of which brings us to using Facebook as a photo-sharing site. Facebook 
lets you upload any and all photos to your Profile page, on a special Photos 
tab. You can organize your photos into separate albums, just like you do 
(or used to do) with physical photo albums. Some users have hundreds and 
thousands of photos available for viewing on the Facebook site. 

That's good. It's good because Facebook makes it so easy to do. 
Uploading photos takes little more than a few clicks of the mouse; it's easy 
enough that anyone can do it. Your photos are automatically visible to 
everyone on the Facebook site, so your friends and potential friends can 
view them. Again, very easy to do. 

Facebook also lets you "tag" people in your photos. This lets you identify 
who is in each photo. So, for example, you have a photo of you and your 
cousin Ernie, you can tag both yourself and Ernie in the photo. This photo 
will appear on your own Profile page, of course, but also show up on Ernie's 
page, when someone clicks the View Photos of Ernie link underneath his 
Profile picture. 

Facebook Photos: The Bad 

That's all well and good, but Facebook is far from a perfect photo-sharing 
site. In fact, there are some very limiting and annoying things you'll run into 
once you start uploading pictures. 

First, there's the fact that everyone by default can see your pictures. Maybe 
you don't want everyone to see your photos; maybe you don't want specific 
people to see specific photos. 

Fortunately, there's a workaround for this, which involves setting the privacy 
levels for your photos albums. You can determine who can and can't view 
individual photo albums, so everyone doesn't have to see everything. But it 



What's Good— and What's Bad— About Sharing Photos on Facebook 149 






does require a bit of work on your part, and the fact that the default setting 
is Everyone is not a good thing. 

Next, we come to how the pictures look. It r****\ 

doesn't matter how high a resolution a photo /^Mrvrr» 

is, when you upload it to Facebook it gets IM U LU 

downsized to a 720 pixel width. So if you have The 72 q pixel width is 
shot a picture at 2592 x 1 944 pixels (common actually a relatively recent 

for a 5 megapixel camera), Facebook down- development, added in 

sizes it to 720 x 540 pixels. That's huge drop summer 2010 to respond 

in image quality, and it's noticeable. to newer widescreen digi- 

tal picture formats. Prior 
Now, why is this image resizing such a big t0 thiS] FaC ebook down- 

deal? It probably isn't if all you're doing is sized photos to a measly 

viewing photos on your computer screen. But 604 pixel width, 

if you want to save a picture to your hard disk 
and then print out a hard copy, a low-resolu- 
tion photo like the kind Facebook presents results in a singularly unsatis- 
factory print. It is not anywhere near the quality you get if you download a 
photo from a site like Flickr or Shutterfly. 

Of course, Facebook doesn't make it easy to download photos in the first 
place. There's no "download" button on a photo viewing page; in fact, you 
kind of get the impression that Facebook doesn't want you to download 
copies of users' photos. You can download photos, however, by using your 
browser's right-click "save as" process, as we discuss later in this chap- 
ter. But it's not easy, it certainly makes it slow to download more than one 
photo, and you end up downloading the crappy low resolution version of the 
photo, anyway. 

Then there's the issue of printing photos. Not surprisingly, there's no "print" 
button on Facebook photo page. You have to use the right-click "print" 
method, or save the photo to your computer and open and print it from a 
photo-editing application. But because you're printing a low-resolution file, 
the results are likely to be disappointing. 

So Is Facebook Good for Photo Sharing, or Not? 

After reading the last few paragraphs, you might think I'm really down on 
using Facebook for photo sharing. That isn't necessarily the case. 



1 50 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 

What Facebook is good for is viewing photos, not necessarily saving them 
for posterity. So if you want to glance at photos of your friend's vacation or 
your nephew's graduation, great. You go to that person's Facebook Profile 
page, open the appropriate photo album, and start browsing through the 
photos onscreen. It's fast and easy and that's all you need. 

But if you want to save a copy of a photo for your own collection, or make 
a print of an important picture, that's where Facebook falls down. The low 
resolution that Facebook uses for photo storage is a big enough negative to 
say that Facebook is horrible for photo swapping; okay for temporary shar- 
ing, but not for permanent keeping. 

Here are two examples of where Facebook is good and where's it's not 
when it comes to photos. The good first. My nephews are in college now, 
and occasionally post photos of what they're doing on and off campus. I'm 
interested in what they're doing, and get a kick out of viewing their photos, 
but really don't need to keep permanent copies of them nor make prints. 
Viewing their photos on Facebook works just fine. 

On the other hand, my stepdaughter likes to post pictures of her family, 
including my two adorable grandkids, on her Facebook page— and only 
on her Facebook page. I'd like to add those photos to my own burgeon- 
ing collection of digital photos that we view on our home computer and 
60" plasma TV, as well as make prints of them from time to time. But it's 
a major league hassle to save pictures from a Facebook photo album, and 
when you do they look really crappy, thanks to the conversion to low-res- 
olution files. If I want quality photos from my 
stepdaughter, I can't get them from Facebook. 



L^Note 



Bottom line, then, Facebook is great for view- 
ing other people's photos, and for letting Facebook says you're 
them look at yours. But if you want others on , y SU pp 0se d to upload 
to download or print your photos, or if you photos for which you have 
want to download or print other people's permission. That means 
photos, Facebook leaves a lot to be desired. uploading your own pho- 
For this type of archival sharing, a site such tos, not photos you've 
as Shutterfly or Snapfish would be a better r 'PP ed off from someone 
choice. or someplace else. 



Creating a Photo Album 151 



Creating a Photo Album 



When it comes to sharing photos on Facebook, the first thing to do is to 
create a new photo album to hold the photos. You can then upload photos 
to this new photo album, or to any other photo album you've created. 

Here's how it works: 

1. Navigate to your Facebook Profile page and click the Photos tab. As you 
can see in Figure 11.1, this tab displays all the photos in which you are 
tagged, as well as your existing photo albums. 



1 Michael Miller 

Wall Info Photos Notes Albums weRead » + 



Photos of Michael 45 photos 
View Comments 



+ Creates Photo Album 





* j|mjbii w ~^m «■■■*■■ 




Figure 11.1. The Photos tab on a Facebook Profile page. 



2. Click the Create a Photo Album button. 

3. When the Add New Photos page appears, make sure the Create Album tab 
is selected, as shown in Figure 11.2. 

4. Type the name for this album into the Album Name box. 

5. Type the location where these photos were taken into the Location box. 
(This step is optional; you can leave this box empty.) 



152 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 



Hi Add New Photos 
















Album Name: 

Location: 

Description: 

Privacy: 


I 






















B Everyone ▼ 

















Figure 1 1.2. Creating a new photo album. 

6. Type a short description of this album into 
the Description box. 

7. To determine who can view the photos in 
this album, click the Privacy button and 
select one of the following: Everyone, 
Friends of Friends, Only Friends, or 
Customize. 

8. To finalize the album, click the Create 
Album button. 

Uploading New Photos 

You can upload new photos while creating an 
album, as you just discovered. You can also 
add photos to an album at any time. 

Facebook lets you upload photos in the 
JPG, GIF, BMP, and PNG file formats. The 
maximum file size you can upload is 15MB — 
although Facebook downsizes larger photos 
to its own low-resolution format. You're limited 
to 200 photos per album, but can have an 



L^Note 

When it comes to speci- 
fying a location for your 
photos, you can enter 
a ZIP code, city name, 
state name, or even just a 
country name. 



J 



L^Note 



These instructions cover 
what Facebook calls the 
New Photo Uploader. If 
Facebook hasn't yet pro- 
vided you with this new 
application, or if you're 
still using the old one (now 
called the Simple Uploader), 
you can access the new one 
by searching for New Photo 
Uploader, then clicking the 
button to install the plug-in. 



J 



Uploading New Photos 153 



unlimited number of albums, which means you 
can upload an unlimited number of photos. 

Here's how to upload photos to a photo 
album: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the 
Photos tab. 

2. Scroll to the bottom of the Photos page and 
click the album to which you want to upload 
new photos. 

3. When the album page appears, click the 
Add More Photos link at the top of the 
page. 






ote 



The first time you upload 
photos to Facebook 
you are prompted to 
download and install the 
Facebook Plug-In. Follow 
the onscreen instructions 
to install this browser 
plug-in, which is neces- 
sary to upload photos to 
Facebook. 






4. When the Select Photos window appears, as shown in Figure 1 1 .3, use the 
tree lists to navigate to the directory where the photos are located. 

Hi Upload Photos - Grand kids 



Organize Edit Info Delete 



I certify that I have the right to distribute these photos and that they do not violate the Terms of Use. 
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Trouble uploading photos? Try the Simple Uploader. 
Got a camera phone? Upload photos straight from your phone, 



Figure 11.3. Selecting photos to upload. 



1 54 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 

5. Click each photo you want to upload. You can upload multiple photos at 
one time. 

6. Click the Upload button. 

Facebook now uploads the photos you selected and adds them to the cur- 
rent photo album. 

Editing, Moving, and Deleting Photos 

After a photo is uploaded, you can edit the description of that photo, move 
the photo to another album, or delete the photo. Follow these steps: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Photos tab. 

2. Click the album that contains the photo you want to edit. 

3. When the album opens, click the photo you want to edit. This displays the 
photo page, like the one shown in Figure 1 1 .4. 



Photos of You 

Photo 6 of 45 PhotosofMe 



In this photo: Michael Miller {photos | remove tag), Amy Elliott {photos | remove tag) 
Added March 12 ■ Comment ' tike 



Write a comment. 



Previous Next 




From your album: 
Profile Pictures 

Share 

Tag This Photo 
Edit This Photo 
Delete This Photo 
Make Profile Picture 



Figure 1 1.4. A Facebook photo page. 



Tagging People in Your Photos 155 

4. To edit the description of this photo, click the Edit This Photo link. When 
the Edit page appears, as shown in Figure 1 1 .5, type a caption for this 
photo into the Caption box, then click the Save Changes button. 



Caption: 



In this photo; Me remove 




Figure 11.5. Editing a photo's description. 

5. To move this photo to a different album, click the Edit This Photo link. 
When the Edit page appears, pull down the Move To list, select the target 
album, and click the Save Changes button. 

6. To delete a photo from Facebook, click the Delete This Photo link. 
Pretty simple, when all is said and done. 



Tagging People in Your Photos 



One of the nice things about Facebook is that you can "tag" all the people 
who appear in your photos. Thus tagged, the photo appears on that per- 
son's photo page as well as your own. (And if you're tagged in someone 
else's photo, that photo appears on your photo page, too.) 

You can tag any of your Facebook friends in photos. You can also tag a 
photo with the name of someone who's not yet a Facebook member, which 
is maybe a good way of identifying people in a photo. 

Here's how to do the tagging thing: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Photos tab. 

2. Click the album that contains the photo you want to edit. 

3. When the photo album opens, click the photo you want to edit. 



156 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 



4. To tag a person in the photo, click the Tag This Photo link under the 
photo. 

5. In the photo, click on the face of the person you want to tag. 

6. Facebook now displays a box around the selected person, along with a list 
of your friends, as shown in Figure 1 1 .6. 




Figure 11.6. Tagging a person in a photo. 

7. Click the correct friend's name in the list, or 
enter the person's name into the text box. 
(You can also tag yourself in the photo, of 
course.) 

8. Click the Done Tagging button. 

By the way, it's also easy to remove a tag 
from a photo. Just navigate to the photo page, 
and you see a list of people tagged in the In 
This Photo section under the picture. Click the 
Remove Tag link to remove any specific tag. 






ote 



If you enter the name 
of a person who isn't 
a Facebook member, 
Facebook prompts you 
to enter that person's 
email address. Facebook 
then emails that person 
a link to the photo and 
invites him or her to join 
Facebook and become 
your friend. 



Sharing Photos with Others 157 

Sharing Photos with Others 

Facebook makes it easy to share any photo you upload with others. You 
can share a photo publicly as a status update, or privately via an email mes- 
sage. Here's how it works: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Photos tab. 

2. Click the album that contains the photo you want to share. 

3. When the album opens, click the photo you want to share. 

4. When the photo page opens, click the Share link beneath the photo; this 
displays the Post to Profile window, shown in Figure 1 1 .7. 



Post to Profile 




From the album: Mike's Photos 

By Midiaei Mler 

Inrfy Wedding reception 



[3 Send as a Ktessage Instead 



fl- 



Figure 11.7. Sharing a photo as a status update. 

5. To share this photo publicly via a status update, type a message to accom- 
pany the photo into the main text box. Then click the Share button. 

6. To share this photo privately via Facebook email, click the Send as a 
Message Instead link. When the Send as a Message window appears, as 
shown in Figure 1 1 .8, enter the recipient's name into the To box, enter 
an accompanying message into the Message box, and click the Send 
Message button. 



158 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 



Send as a Message 



Message I 




Fmm the album: Mikp'<; Phntns 

By Michael Milter 

Indy WedAig reception 



£}] PuiL Lu Riurite iitLtMiJ 



Figure 11.8. Sharing a photo via private message. 



Managing Your Photos and Albums 

After you upload a lot of photos to Facebook, you might want to spend a 
little time organizing your photos and albums. Here's what you can do, and 
how to do it: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Photos tab. 

2. Click the album you want to edit. 

3. When the album opens, click the Organize Photos link at the top of the 
page. This opens the Edit Album page. 

4. To change the order of photos in the album, select the Organize tab, 
shown in Figure 1 1 .9. Click the photo you want to move and then drag it 
into a new position. Click the Save Changes button when done. 

5. To reverse the order of photos in the album, select the Organize tab then 
click the Reverse Order button. Click the Save Changes button when 
done. 

6. To edit the description of the album, select the Edit Info tab, shown in 
Figure 11.10. You can change the Album Name, Location, Description, or 
Privacy settings. Click the Save Changes button when done. 



Managing Your Photos and Albums 159 



Q] Edit Album - Grandkids 



Edit Photos Add More K ■ Edit Info Delete 



Note: Drag photos to rearrange them. When you're finished, press the Save Changes button. 





Figure 1 1.9. Organizing the order of photos in an album. 



Q) Edit Album - Grandkids 






| Edit Photos | Add More | Organize [ ] Delete | 


Back to Album 






Album Name; 

Location: 

Description: 


Grandkids 
























Privacy: 

1 


A Everyone v 

Cancel 













Figure 11.10. Editing a photo album. 



160 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 

7. To delete this photo album and all its contents, click the Delete tab. When 
prompted to confirm this action, click the Delete button. 

Viewing Other People's Photos 

Sharing your own photos is only part of the fun. You can also spend a lot of 
time viewing the photos that your friends have uploaded to Facebook. 

Viewing Photos and Photo Albums 

To view a friend's photos, go to her Profile page and click the Photos tab. 
As you can see in Figure 11.11, the top part of this page displays all the 
photos where your friend is tagged. The most recent 15 photos are dis- 
played on this page; additional photos are displayed by clicking the Next 
link above the photos or by going directly to a specific numbered page of 
photos. 



Photos of Sherry 100 photos 

View Comments Photos of Sherry and Me (9) 



12 3 4 5 Next Last 









Figure 11.11. Viewing a friend's photos. 



At the bottom of the photos tab are your friend's photo albums, as shown in 
Figure 11.12. The first four albums, plus the Profile Pictures album, are dis- 
played here; click the Next link to view additional albums. 



Viewing Other People's Photos 161 



Sherry's Albums 15 Photo Albums 
View Comments 



12 3 4 Next 




Figure 11.12. Viewing a friend's photo albums. 

To view the pictures in an album, click that 
album's name or thumbnail. This displays a 
page full of pictures, as shown in Figure 11.13. 
To display additional pages, click the Next link; 
to return to your friend's Photos tab, click the 
Back to Friend's Photos link. 



L^Note 

The Profile Pictures album 
is automatically generated 
by Facebook, and con- 
tains all the photos you've 
used as Profile pictures. 



Photos 1 - 20 out of 26 Bad; to Sherry 'French Elliott' Miller's Photos 




Figure 11.13. Viewing photos in a photo album. 



162 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 



To view a given picture, click that photos' thumbnail. This displays the 
photo at its largest size, as shown in Figure 11.14. To view the next pic- 
ture in the album, click the Next link or just click the picture; either method 
advances the display. 



Sherry 'French Elliott' Miller's Photos - Summer 2010 

Photo 12 of 26 Back to Album ■ Sherry's Photos ■ Sherry's Profile 



Previous Next 




Happy 2nd Birthday, .Hayley 

In this photo: Sherry 'French Elliott' Miller (photos) 



From the album: 

Summer 20 10 by Sherry 'French 

Elliott Miller 



Figure 11.14. Viewing a friend's photo. 



Adding Your Comments 

You can comment on any picture you view. Just click the Comment link 
under the photo; this opens the Comment box, shown in Figure 11.15. Type 
your comment into the box and then click the Comment button. 



Added June 7 ■ Comment Like 



Write a comment. 



Figure 11.15. Commenting on a friend's photo. 



Viewing Other People's Photos 163 

You can also just "like" a photo. Click the Like link to voice your approval. 

Tagging Yourself in a Photo 

If you find yourself in a friend's photo, you can tag yourself therein. (You can 
also tag other people, not just yourself.) You do this the same way you add 
tags to your own photo. Click the Tag This Photo link, click your face in the 
photo, and then check your name in the accompanying list. Click the Tag 
button to make it stick. 

Sharing a Photo 

See a friend's photo that you'd like to share with others? You can share 
friends' photos just as you can share your own. Click the Share link under 
the photo, and then opt to share as a public status update to your Profile 
page or via private email message. Enter an accompanying message and 
then click the Share button. 

Printing a Photo 

Now we come to something a little more difficult. What do you do if you 
want to print a friend's photo? There's no "print" button on the page, after 
all. 

What you have to do is take advantage of your web browser's ability to print 
photos on a Web page. If you're using Internet Explorer, for example, all you 
have to do is right-click the photo and select Print Picture from the pop-up 
menu. Other browsers have similar commands. 

This prints the photo at its 720 x whatever resolution— which isn't great, but 
it's all you got. 

Downloading a Photo 

Similarly, there's no "download" or "save" button on a Facebook photo 
page, which makes it difficult to save a copy of a photo on your computer. 
Again, we turn to your Web browser to do the trick. 

If you're using Internet Explorer, right-click on the photo you want to save 
and then select Save Picture As from the pop-up menu. When the Save 



164 CHAPTER 11 Sharing Family Pictures 

Picture dialog box appears, select a location for the stored photo, give it a 
name, and then click the Save button. Other browsers have similar features. 

Downloading Multiple Photos 

What if you want to save lots of photos? This manual method of saving files 
can be a bit cumbersome, after all. 

To download large numbers of photos from Facebook, you have to turn 
to a third-party application, such as Photo Download or Photo Album 
Downloader. You can find these applications by entering their names into 
the Facebook search box; after you get to the appropriate Facebook page, 
click the Go to Application button and, when prompted, click the Allow but- 
ton. You can then use the application to download photos in which you're 
tagged, photos in your own albums (great for archiving pictures you've 
uploaded), or photos in a friend's photo album. 

For example, Figure 11.16 shows the Photo Album Downloader application 
at work. Select the album you want to download and the application down- 
loads the album's photos to your computer's hard drive. It's not necessarily 
elegant, but it's a lot faster than downloading each photo manually. 



Photo Album Downloader 



Photo Album Downloader v 2 .o 



What would you like to do ? 

>>Download My Tagged Photos 
>>Download Some Of My Own Albums 
>>Download A Full Friend's Photo Album 



Figure 11.16. Downloading all the photos in an album with Photo Album 
Downloader. 



Viewing Other People's Photos 165 



Other Ways to Share Photos on Facebook 

This chapter talked about sharing photos via Facebook's photo albums. 
This is as good a way as any to share photos on Facebook, but it's not 
the only method available. 

Previously in this book we talked about attaching a photo to a status 
update. (You do this by clicking the Photo button under the Publisher 
box.) This is a good way to share photos publicly; it's essentially the 
same as clicking the Share link under a photo in an album. 

You can also share photos by attaching them to private messages. 
(Just click the Photo button under the message box.) This is probably 
the easiest way to privately share photos with friends, although you're 
limited by the one photo to a message rule. 

By the way, if you want to view all the latest photos uploaded by your 
Facebook friends, go to your Home page and click Photos in the side- 
bar. This displays a page of thumbnails of the latest pictures uploaded. 
It's a great way to keep up on what your friends are up to, visually. 



This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter 1 x 



Sharing Home Movies 



Now you know how to share your digital photos with friends 
and family on Facebook. But did you know you can also use 
Facebook to share your home movies? All you have to do 
is have your movies in digital format (which you probably 
do, if you're shooting with a relatively new camcorder). You 
can then upload your digital video files for all your Facebook 
friends to see. 

And that's not all. If you have videos already uploaded to 
YouTube, you can share those videos in your Facebook sta- 
tus updates. In fact, you can share just about any YouTube 
video — even those from other users— with your Facebook 
friends. It's pretty cool, once you get started. 

The Ins and Outs of Sharing Videos 
on Facebook 

Facebook lets you upload just about any type of video and 
share it as a status update— which means all your friends 
should see it as part of their News Feeds. Your uploaded 
videos also end up on a Video tab on your Profile page, 
much the same way that uploaded photos end up on your 
Photos tab. 

Shooting Videos for Facebook 

Where do you get videos to upload? It all starts with a digi- 
tal video camera, or what some people call a camcorder. 
Today's camcorders save your movies in one of these com- 
mon video file formats, which you can then transfer to your 
personal computer for editing. 



168 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 

Any video camera does the job, it doesn't have to be a fancy one. In fact, 
those inexpensive little "flip" cameras are just fine for Facebook use. But in 
practice, you can use any video camera you happen to own. 

It helps, of course, if your camera is a digital one (all new ones are), as a 
digital camcorder by nature saves your movies as digital video files, which 
is what you end up uploading to Facebook. But even if you have an older 
camcorder that stores videos on old-school videotapes, there are ways to 
transfer your movies from tape to computer files. 



What to Upload 

What kinds of videos you can you upload to Facebook? Home movies are 
common, although you can upload other types of videos, as long as you're 
not uploading any copyrighted material. That means you can't upload com- 
mercial videos, or videos that contain commercial music in the background. 

You can upload videos already stored as digital files, or create new videos 
in real-time from your computer's webcam. Videos must be no more than 
20 minutes long, and no more than 1024MB in size. Facebook accepts vid- 
eos in the following file formats: 

3G2 • MPE 



3GP 

3GPP 

ASF 

AVI 

DAT 

FLV 

M4V 

MKV 

MOD 

MOV 

MP4 



MPEG 

MPEG4 

MPG 

NSV 

OGM 

OGV 

QT 

TOD 

VOB 

WMV 



Uploading Your Videos 1 69 

That's pretty much any video file format that's in use today. 

As to resolution and aspect ratio and all that other technical stuff you prob- 
ably don't know much about, not to worry; Facebook accepts videos at 
any resolution in either standard or widescreen aspect ratio. So if you have 
a video camera that shoots in high-definition widescreen, Facebook plays 
back your videos in all their HD glory. And if your camcorder is an older one 
without HD capabilities, that's okay, too. 

Editing Your Videos 

I do recommend editing your movies, as opposed to uploading raw video 
files. Editing lets you get rid of those scenes that don't work, for whatever 
reason (bad lighting, jittery camerawork, awkward action), and create a more 
concise movie. Today's video-editing programs let you cut and rearrange 
scenes, insert transitions between scenes, and add title cards, graphics, and 
other special effects. The end result can look quite professional, with little 
effort on your part. 

Fortunately, some of the most versatile and easiest to use video-editing 
programs are free or relatively low cost. The free programs are those that 
come with your computer's operating system: Windows Movie Maker (for 
Windows users) and iMovie (if you have an Apple Mac). If you need more 
features than these programs offer, check out one of these programs: 

• Adobe Premiere Elements (www.adobe.com/products/premiereel/, $99.99) 

• Pinnacle Studio HD (www.pinnaclesys.com, $49.99) 

• Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD (www.sonycreativesoftware/moviestudiohd/, 
$49.95) 



Uploading Your Videos 



To share a home movie on Facebook, you first have to upload the video to 
the Facebook site. This is a lot like uploading photos, except that you don't 
organize videos into albums as you do with your pictures. Videos are stored 
as a single group on the Video tab on your Facebook Profile page. 



170 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 

Displaying the Video Tab 

Before you can upload photos to Facebook, you must first display the Video tab 
on your Profile page. (This tab is not displayed by default.) Here's how to do it: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page. 

2. Click the + tab at the end of the row of tabs, as shown in Figure 12.1 . 

3. Select Video from the list of available tabs. 



Wall Info 



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bring all the old fish back home. 
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^ In this photo: Michael Miller 



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.m LivingSoadl 

Search available tabs; 






Figure 12.1. Adding a Video tab to your Profile page. 
Voila! You now have a Video tab on your Profile page. 

Uploading a Video File 

After you've displayed the Video tab, you can now upload home movies— as 
video files— to Facebook. Follow these steps: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Video tab, shown in Figure 
12.2. 













Video / 


+ 






Wall 


Info 


Photos 


Notes 


Events 


















| + Upload 


D Record 



Figure 12.2. Getting ready to upload a video from your Video tab. 



2. Click the Upload button. 

3. When the Create a New Video page appears, as shown in Figure 12.3, make 
sure the File Upload tab is selected, then click the Choose File or Browse 
button. 



Uploading Your Videos 171 



5P Create a New Video 



Mobile Video Record Video 



Back to My Videos 





Select a video file on your computer. 

Want a bigger limit? Verify your account. 










I; Br.Qws.e_ :| 




Please upload a file only if: 

■ The video is under 100 MB and under 2 minutes, 

■ The video was made by you or your friends. 

■ You or one of your friends appears in the video, 





Figure 12.3. Uploading a video file. 

4. When the Open or Choose File to Upload dialog box appears, navigate to 
and select the file to upload and then click the Open button. 

5. While the video is uploading, Facebook displays the Edit Video page, 
shown in Figure 12.4. Enter a title for this video in the Title box. 



S* Create a New Video 



Mobile Video Record Video 



Back to My Videt'? 



Please wait while your video Is uploading. 




\^M M4J J- 1 ■ 




5 08 M B of 54.35 M B (157.72 KB/sec} - S minutes remaining 

Enter the following info white you wait for your upload to finish. 








Title: 












Description: 
Privacy: 










fl Everyone "*■ 




— i 


J 





Figure 12.4. Entering information for an uploaded video. 



172 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 

6. Enter a short description of this video in the Description box. 

7. Click the Privacy button to determine who can watch this video: Everyone 
(default), Friends of Friends, Friends Only, or Customize. 

8. Click the Save Info button. 

When the file is finished uploading (which can take a bit of time, especially 
if you have a long video or are on a slow Internet connection), it appears on 
your Video tab. 

Recording a Webcam Video 

You can also upload videos recorded from your computer's webcam, in real 
time. This is a great way to do a quick-and-dirty video for your Facebook 
friends, no fancy hardware or software required. (Beyond the webcam, of 
course.) 

Here's how to do it: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Video tab. 

2. Click the Record button. 

3. When the Create a New Video page appears, make sure the Record Video 
tab is selected; you see a live shot from your computer's webcam, as 
shown in Figure 12.5. 

4. Click the red Record button to begin 
recording. 



L^Note 



5. When you're done recording, click the Stop If you're prompted to okay 
button. the use of the Flash plug- 

„ x , ., in for recording, check 

6. You can now watch the video you just . 

/\CJrS6. 

recorded, as shown in Figure 12.6, by click- 
ing the Play button. 

7. If you don't like what you see, click the Reset button to start over. 

8. To save the video you just recorded, click the Save button. 



Uploading Your Videos 1 73 



SC Create a New Video 

Hie Upload | Mobile Video (, 



Back to My Videos 




Figure 12.5. Getting ready to record a webcam video. 




Figure 12.6. Saving your webcam video. 



9. Facebook now displays the Edit Video page, shown in Figure 12.7. Enter 
the names of you or any of your Facebook friends appearing in this video 
into the In This Video box. 

10. Enter a title for this video into the Title box. 

11. Enter a short description of this video into the Description box. 

12. Click the Privacy button to determine who can watch this video. 



174 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 



■£• Edit Video 



In this video: 


_ew Archer Remove 


Choose a Thumbnail: 








in. 






Tag yew (nencfe who appear "m the video. 






Title 




VL3bt 








■ «ll x»^li h 


Description: 
Privacy 








I ► | ThjmblofZ 












B Everyone ▼ 






oocni 



Figure 12. 7. Editing a webcam video. 

13. If multiple thumbnails are available, go to the Choose a Thumbnail section 
and select which thumbnail image you want displayed for this video. 

14. Click the Save button. 



Editing Video Information 



If you have been following my instructions, you've already entered informa- 
tion about your videos, as well as tagged any of your friends appearing in 
a video. If you didn't enter this info, however, you can enter it at any later 
time— or edit information you'd like to change. 

Here's how to edit your video information: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Video tab. 

2. Click the video you want to edit. This displays the video page shown in 
Figure 12.8. 

3. To edit video information, click the Edit This Video link beneath the video. 
When the Edit Video page appears, enter or change any of the following 
information: title, description, privacy level, or thumbnail image. 

4. To add or remove a tag for someone appearing in the video, click the Tag 
This Video link. When the In This Video box expands (beneath the video 
itself), enter the names of any Facebook friends appearing in this video 
and then click the Done Tagging button. 



Sharing Uploaded Videos 175 

I 




in this video: No ore. 
Added about 7 men Ira ago 



![HU] 

by Michael Mfler [videos) 



Ldln lites cheese 



View in Regular Qijolty 
Tag Thk Vu\pa 
Cdlt This Video 
UplpTPVlrtPO 
Embed the Wdeo 



Figure 12.8. Use this page to edit— or just watch— your video. 



5. To delete this video, click the Delete Video link. 



Sharing Uploaded Videos 



Just as with photos, any video you've uploaded to Facebook can be shared 
publicly or privately with your friends and family— which is a great way for 
the people you love to see your home movies. Here's how to do it: 

1. Navigate to your Profile page and select the Video tab. 

2. Click the video you want to share. 

3. When the page for the selected video opens, click the Share button to dis- 
play the Post to Profile Page window, shown in Figure 12.9. 



176 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 




1:15 Added about 7 months ago 



[53 5end as a Message nstead 



a- 



Figure 12.9. Posting a video as a status update. 



4. 



5. 



To share this video publicly as a status 
update, enter an accompanying message in 
the large text box and then click the Share 
button. 

To share this video privately via Facebook 
email, click the Send as a Message Instead 
link to switch to the Send as a Message 
window, shown in Figure 12.10. Enter the 
recipient's name into the To box, enter an 
accompanying message into the Message 
box, and click the Send Message button. 



fl&Ti? 



V 



You can also embed any 
Facebook video into your 
own Web page or blog. To 
get the embed code, go to 
the video's page and click 
the Embed This Video link. 
When the Embed Your Video 
dialog box appears, copy 
the embed code and paste it 
into your Web page's under- 
lying HTML code. 



Send as a Message 










To; 






Hta&fiyt= 


^^^^r '-^^^^^^^^1 


rhww! [HD] 

By Mchael Miller 




£}] PuiL In Pi ti fife h&Leud 




MBMBo— 1 









Figure 12.10. Sharing a video via a private message. 



Posting YouTube Videos 1 77 



Posting YouTube Videos 

Here's another way to share videos on 
Facebook. If you're familiar with the YouTube 
video sharing site, you can post any YouTube 
video as a Facebook status update. 

That's right, you can share any YouTube video 
on Facebook. This includes videos you've 
uploaded to the YouTube site, as well as any 
other public YouTube video uploaded by any 
other user, including all those videos of cute 
kittens and laughing babies. It's a great way to 
share not only your own videos but also any 
videos you find funny or useful or whatever. 

There are two keys to posting a YouTube 
video file to Facebook. First, you have to have 
a YouTube account. (Don't worry; it's free.) 
Second, you need to link your YouTube and 
Facebook accounts, which is pretty much a 
one-click operation. 

From there, it's all a matter of finding a 
YouTube video you want to share, and then 
clicking the appropriate buttons. Here's how it 
works: 

1 



L^Note 

YouTube is the world's 
largest online video com- 
munity, with hundreds of 
millions of videos available 
for viewing. Learn more 
about YouTube in my 
companion book, Sams 
Teach Yourself YouTube 
in 10 Minutes (Michael 
Miller, Sams Publishing, 
2009). 



rtS 



^T Tip 



Because YouTube video 
files can be twice as large 
(2GB) as those allowed 
for direct uploading to 
Facebook, embedding a 
YouTube video might be a 
better way to share larger 
video files, such as those 
recorded in high definition. 



Go to YouTube (www.youtube.com) and log 
into your YouTube account. 

2. Navigate to the video you want to post to Facebook. 

3. Underneath the video player, click the Share button to expand the Share 
panel, as shown in Figure 12.11. 

4. Click the Facebook button. 

5. The first time you share a YouTube video, you see the Facebook Login 
window. Enter your email address and Facebook password, then click the 
Login button. (You won't see this window again.) 

6. When the Post to Profile window appears, as shown in Figure 12.12, enter 
an accompanying message into the large text box. 



178 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 



High Definition Videos for YouTube 

trapperjohn20D0 12 videos |w| Subscribe 




trapper] oh nHK» 4pnl 12. 2D09 2:E3 [w) 656 ^ 

YouTube for Business author Michael Miller discusses YouTube's new high defin... views© 



Q 



Save to » __E Share 



# 



http :/iWww.yo utu D e . co miWatch ?v-yD StH qu EC Kg 



: 



<Embed> ' ' !■ 



D ShnrtURL □ HD URL 

i .Email Q Facebook Twitter (jMySpace Q oricut @ ni5 (^Bloqqer 

g£g Live Spaces ©Betio £ Buzz $j StumPleUpon 



Figure 12.11. Getting ready to share a YouTube video. 



^ Facebook - Google Chrome 



http://wwrw.facebaak,cam/5harer.php?u=h^ 



f Post to Profile 







High Definition Videos for YouTube 

http : //www .youtube . com/watch?* =vDStHqLiECKg 

YouTube for Business author Michael Miller discusses YouTube's new high 

definition widescreen video format. Learn more at 

http : //www .molehillgroup , com 

loft C-K55 5- . -: .- = 

| | Ho Thumbnail 



r 35 ! Send as a Message instead 

'I 



a- 



Cancel 



' 



Figure 12.12. Sharing a YouTube video. 



Posting YouTube Videos 1 79 

7. Select a thumbnail to display (if more than one thumbnail image is avail- 
able), or check the No Thumbnail option to post the video without a corre- 
sponding thumbnail image. 

8. Click the Share button. 

This video is now posted as a status update to Facebook, like the one 
shown in Figure 12.13. To play a YouTube video embedded as a status 
update, simply click the video name or thumbnail in the post. A larger video 
player displays within the Facebook News Feed, complete with playback 
controls, as shown in Figure 12.14. Alternatively, click the title of the video 
in the News Feed and you open that video's playback page on the YouTube 
site. 



"TUPl Michael Miller I- 


ere's a cool YouTube video! 


-■A ■ 


^T 


^H High Definition Videos for YouTube 
1 www . youtube .com 


1 


■^ 


1 YouTube for Business author Michael Miller discusses YouTube's new 
1 high definition widescreen video format. Learn more at 
1 http: //www . molehillgroup . com/ 


H 


9 seconds ago 


Comment * Like ■ Share 



Figure 12.13. A YouTube video shared via Facebook status update. 




High Definition Videos for YouTube 

www.youtube.com 

YouTube for Business author Michael Miller discusses YouTube's new high definition widescreen 

video format. Learn more at http://www.molehillgroup.com/ 



I a few second? ago ■ Comment ■ Like Share 



Figure 12.14. Watching a YouTube video on Facebook. 



180 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 

Watching Your Friends' Videos 

With all this talk about sharing your own videos, how do you watch videos 
that your friends have posted to Facebook? There are two ways to go about 
it. 



Watching a Video in the News Feed 

When a friend first uploads a video, it should show up in your News Feed, 
looking something like the one in Figure 12.15. Click the video and it now 
gets larger on the page and starts to play, as shown in Figure 12.16. To 
control the video, simply hover your cursor over it; the various playback 
controls display, from left to right: 

• Pause/Play 

• Time slider (slide to move to another point in the video) 

• Elapsed timeATotal time 

• Mute/Volume 

• Full screen 



Lew Archer v,-as tagged in a video Me at the coffeeshop. 






Heat the coffeeshop 
This is me sitting at Starbucks. 
Le-igth: 0:05 



h: 



Figure 12. 15. A video posted as a Facebook status update. 

To pause playback, click the Pause button, which then changes to a Play 
button. To resume playback click the Play button. 

To move to another point in the video, click and drag the Time slider left 
(earlier) or right (later). To mute the sound, click the Mute button; click this 
button again to unmute the sound. To adjust the video's volume, click and 
drag across the Volume control. And to view the video full-screen, click the 
Full-Screen button; press Esc to exit full-screen mode. 



Watching Your Friends' Videos 181 



Lew Archer This is me sitting at Starbucks. 



:9 




Me at the coffeeshop 
Length: 0:05 

"£* 14 minutes ago - Comment Like Share 



Figure 12.16. Watching a Facebook video, complete with playback controls. 

Watching a Video on Its Own Page 

You can also view any Facebook video on its own video page, like the one 
shown in Figure 12.17. This page displays the video a bit larger than on the 
News Feed page, which is a good thing. On this page, click the video to 
begin playback, then hover over the video to display the playback controls. 



Videos Posted by Lew Archer 

Videos of Lew 




In this Video: Lew Archer (videos) 
Recorded 15 minutes ago ■ Comment Like 



Write a comment. . 



Me at the coffeeshop 

by Lew Archer (videos) 
0:05 

This is me sitting at Starbucks. 



| W Share | 

Tag This Video 
Report Video 



Figure 12.17. A Facebook video playback page. 



182 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 

The dedicated video page also displays more information about the video, 
including those people tagged in the video and any comments left by other 
viewers. To leave your comments, click the Comments link under the video 
and type into the text box that appears; click the Comment button when 
done. 

Of course, you can also use this page to share this video with your other 
friends. Click the Share button to display the Post to Profile dialog box, 
shown in Figure 12.18. Enter your comments into the text box then click 
the Share button to post this update as a status update of your own. If 
you prefer to share the video privately, click Send as a Message Instead to 
display the Send as a Message dialog box; enter the recipient's name into 
the To box, enter your message into the Message box, then click the Send 
Message button. 



Post to Profile 



u& 



Me at the coffeeshop 

By Lew Archer 

0:05 Recorded 16 minutes ago 



F^l Send as a Message instead 



B-"- I 1 1 Cancel 



Figure 12. 18. Sharing a Facebook video. 



Viewing Your Friends' Most Recent Videos 

And if you want to view the latest videos uploaded by your friends, go to the 
Facebook Home page and click Photos (that's right, Photos) in the sidebar. 
When the Photos page appears, click Video in the sidebar. This displays a 
grid of video thumbnails, as shown in Figure 12.19; these are chronologically 
the newest videos that your friends have uploaded. Click any thumbnail to 
play back the video on its own video page. 



Watching Your Friends' Videos 183 



G Video 



| + Upload Photos + Upload Video 




M e a t th e co ff e . : , 
by Lew Archer 



Sisters and Cou... 

by Michael Miller 



Concert in the.. 
by Michael Miller 




Ch eesef 

by Michael Miller 



Figure 12.19. Browsing your friends' most recent videos. 



Video Resolution 

In general, higher resolution is always better. In terms of video play- 
back, a higher resolution video looks sharper than one recorded at a 
lower resolution; there's just more detail in the picture. The best picture 
quality comes from so-called high-definition videos, which have the 
highest possible resolution. 

Facebook lets you upload videos at any resolution, low to high, and to 
watch videos recorded at any resolution, too. Great, you might think; I 
want to watch all my videos in the highest possible resolution. 

The problem with this is that higher resolution means larger file sizes 
(more information in the video file), which then translates into longer 
download times. If you have a particularly slow Internet connection, this 
could result in stuttering playback, or unwanted pauses while the down- 
load catches up to your viewing. 

The solution, if you have a slow Internet connection, is to watch your 
videos at a lower resolution. You can do this when watching videos on 
their own playback pages on Facebook. 



184 CHAPTER 12 Sharing Home Movies 



Facebook labels videos recorded at a higher-than-normal resolution as HQ 
videos. Videos recorded in high definition are labeled as HD videos. By 
default, Facebook's video playback page plays videos at their highest reso- 
lution. To play back a video at a lower resolution, click the View in Regular 
Quality link beneath the video. That should speed things up for you. 



Chaffer- 1 X 



Sharing Birthdays and 
Events 



Being as Facebook is a social network, what could be more 
social than sharing important events with your friends? 
You can use Facebook to let your friends know of upcom- 
ing birthdays in your tribe, community gatherings, business 
meetings, parties, you name it. It's all done via Facebook's 
Events feature, which lets you both respond to other peo- 
ple's events and create events of your own. 

Why You Might Like Events 

To be honest, events are probably one of the least used fea- 
tures on Facebook. I'm not sure why; they're quite useful for 
scheduling get-togethers with friends, family members, and 
co-workers. 

I guess it helps to understand exactly what an "event" is. On 
Facebook, an event is like an item on your personal sched- 
ule. Events can be small and private, like a doctor's appoint- 
ment or dinner with a friend. Events can also be large and 
public, like a museum opening or family reunion. 

As such, you can use events to invite friends to cocktail par- 
ties, soccer games, or community meetings. You can also 
use Facebook events to remember friends' birthdays. 

The events you work with don't have to be real-world, physi- 
cal events, either. You can schedule virtual events, such as 
inviting all your friends to watch a specific TV show on a 
given evening. You can also schedule online events, such as 
seminars and conferences on sites that offer such options. 



186 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 

In other words, you don't have to meet someone in person to share an event 
with them. 

There are tons of events scheduled on Facebook by other members of the site. 
The best way to find new events is by using the search box on the Facebook 
toolbar; you can also browse scheduled events being attended by your 
Facebook friends. When you find an event you want to attend, or when you've 
been invited to an event by a friend, you can then RSVP your intentions. 

Of course, you can also create your own events. Maybe your child has a 
sporting event or concert coming up you want to invite family members to. 
Maybe you're hosting a big party for your real-world friends. Or maybe you 
just want to let everyone know about an important community gathering. 
Whatever the case, Facebook makes it relatively easy to create new events 
and invite some or all of your Facebook friends to these events. 

Searching for and Attending Events 

Let's start with the quest for new events to attend. You can search events by 
name, date, or type. Here's how it works: 

1. Enter one or more keywords that describe the event into the search box in 
the Facebook toolbar and then click the Search (the magnifying glass) but- 
ton or press the Enter key on your keyboard. 

2. The search results page now displays, but these results include much more 
than just events. To display only events that match your query, click Events 
in the sidebar. 

3. Now Facebook displays those events that 

match your query, as shown in Figure 13.1. NotP 

To filter these events by date, pull down the 

Dates list at the top of the page and select Most event ^P es nave their 

All Dates (default), Today, Tomorrow, One own subt yP es : the Sub " 

.... „ .. ,, types list appears after you 

Week, or One Month. 3 , KK ' 

select a main event type. 

4. You can also filter events by type of event— For example, if you select 
Party, Causes, Education, Meetings, Music Causes, you can then drill 
and Arts, Sports, Trips, and Other. (Plus All clown further by select- 
Event Types, of course.) To filter this list, in 9 Fundraiser, Protest, or 
pull down the Event Type list at the top of Ral| y as a subt YP e - 
the page and make a selection. 



Searching for and Attending Events 187 



nity band 



C^ All Results 
0^ People 



Did you mean: sccommunity bank, commune brand, icoinmunity bah 



I^] Pages 
[ill Groups 
1^1 Applications 



Show: All Dates Q All EventTypes |T[ 



Attending: 
Time: 



Web Results 
[EH Posts by Friends 
[li~| Posts by Everyone 




Name: 

Attending: 

Time: 



BLACKSTONE VALLEY COMMUNITY 
CONCERT BAND concert 

2 confirmed guests 
Yesterday at 3: 30pm 

Austin Community Big Band 

1 confirmed guests 
Wednesday at 7: 00pm 



Westwinds Community Band 

1 confirmed guests 
Saturday at 4:00pm 



community band concert 

1 confirmed guests 
Saturday at 3:30pm 



Figure 13.1. Displaying events that match your search query. 

5. If you think you want to attend the event, click the RSVP link. The RSVP to 
This Event dialog box displays, as shown in Figure 13.2. Check your inten- 
tion (Attending, Maybe Attending, or Not Attending), add an optional note 
to the event's organizer, then click the RSVP button. 







RSVP to this Evei 












Austin C 

Wednesday 

a Attending 

"• [ laybe Attendin 
j Not Attending 

\6d an RSVP note to tt 


□mm unity Big Band 

7:00pm 

3 

e event: (Optional) 






4 
















] | Cancel | 


L. 


-^—i—. TT77 


^n> ^ 





Figure 13.2. RSVP'ing to an event. 



6. If you want to learn more about an event before RSVP'ing, click the event's 
title to view the Facebook page for that event. 



188 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 

RSVP'ing to Events 

As you just saw, you can RSVP to an event directly from a search results 
page. You can also RSVP to an event from the Facebook page for that 
event, from a friend's status update post about an event, or from an email 
that a friend might send you about an event. 



RSVP'ing from the Event Page 

Let's start by going to the Facebook page for an event, seeing what's there, 
and then RSVP'ing or sharing notice of that event. 

When you click on the title of an event anywhere on the Facebook site, you 
display the page for that event. As you can see in Figure 13.3, a typical 
event page contains more information about the event itself— the start and 
end times, location, description, even a list of guests attending. 



[?i] Sock changing party 










Start Time: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 at 9:30pm 
End Time: Thursday., June 24 r 2010 at 12;30am 
Location: My hosue 








Description 




Not yet. 


Remove from My Events 


Confirmed Guests 








This event has 1 confirmed guest 


See All 


4 Share 1 + Export 1 




m 

Lew Archer 




Your RSVP 


You still need to RSVP, 

i") Attending 

(~) Maybe Attending 

O Not Attending 


Wall 


See All Photos See All Videos 




Other Invites 


Awaiting Reply (1) 


■ 

Michael 
Miller 


Sock changing party has no recent posts. 




Older Posts *r 




Event Informs Son 



Figure 13.3. Viewing an event's Facebook page. 



RSVP'ing to Events 189 

You can use this page to RSVP to an event, download that event to any cal- 
endar application on your computer, or share notice of that event with your 
friends. Here's how it works: 

1. To RSVP to an event, check the appropriate option in the Your RSVP box: 
Attending, Maybe Attending, or Not Attending. 

2. To download this event to your computer's calendar program, such as 
Microsoft Outlook, click the Export button on the event page to display 
the Export Event dialog box, shown in Figure 13.4. Check the Download 
Calendar Appointment option and then click the Okay button. 



Export Event 



How would you like to export this event? 

'*' Download calendar appointment 

O Send Email: [T| 



TB Cancel 



Figure 13.4. Downloading event info to a calendar application. 



To email yourself a notice of this event, click the Export button on the event 
page to display the Export Event dialog box, check the Send Email option, 
verify your email address and then click the Okay button. 

Likewise, you can also share notice of an event with your Facebook friends. 
To share an event as a public status update, click the Share button on the 
event page to display the Post to Profile dialog box, shown in Figure 13.5, 
enter some accompanying text and then click the Post button. 




Sock changing party 

This event is planned to start at 9 : 30 pm on Hun 23 ,. 20 10 at My hosue . 



F^n 1 Send as a Message instead 



a- 



Figure 13.5. Sharing an event as a status update. 



190 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 

5. To email notice of an event to a friend via Facebook private message, click 
the Share button on the event page to display the Post to Profile dialog 
box then click the Send as a Message Instead link. When the Send as a 
Message dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 13.6, enter your friend's 
name into the To box, enter a short message into the Message box, then 
click the Send Message button. 



: 



Send as a Message 



Sock changing party 

This event is planned to start at 9: 30 pm on Jun 23 r 2010 at My hosue. 



<§] Post to Profile instead 



Send Message w 



Figure 13.6. Sharing an event via private message. 

RSVP'ing from a Status Update 

Your friends will sometimes post notice of upcoming events that they've 
created, or are interested in. (Figure 13.7 shows how such an event looks in 
your News Feed.) 



Dinah Lance Bring lots of stuff to eat! 

Lance Family Reunion 
31 I Saturday, August 28, 2010 at 5:00pm 

[3^ IS seconds ago ■ Comment ■ Like * Share ■ RSVP to this event 



Figure 13.7. An event notification in the Facebook News Feed. 



To respond directly to one of these status update notices, click the RSVP to 
This Event link. This displays the RSVP to This Event dialog box, where you 
can check Attending, Maybe Attending, or Not Attending, and then click the 
RSVP button. If you'd rather read more about the event in question, simply 
click the event's titles in the News Feed. 



RSVP'ing to Events 191 

RSVP'ing from an Email Invitation 

Occasionally you receive event invitations from Facebook friends. These 
invitations show up in the Events section at the top right of your Home page, 
as shown in Figure 13.8. Click the link for an event to view its Facebook 
page; from there you can RSVP by selecting the appropriate action in the 
Your RSVP box. 



What are you planning? 



[3^ Lance Family Reunion 

August 28 at 5:00pm 
RSVP: Yes -No -Maybe 



Figure 13.8. Event notifications on the Facebook Home page. 

You can also receive invitations via regular email. (Not Facebook private 
message, but the regular old email address that you supplied to Facebook 
when you first signed up.) Figure 13.9 shows what an email invitation looks 
like; click the link in the email to open your web browser and display the 
event's Facebook page. You can RSVP from there. 




liiuirifiiyiuuuiaiHJUUNHi 

Lew invited you to "Sock changing party" today. 

Event: Sock changing party 
Start Time: Today, June 23 at 9:30pm 
End Time: Tomorrow, June 24 at 12:30am 
Where: My hosue 

To see more details and RSVP, follow the link below: 
http://www.facebook.com/n/?event.php&eid=12952315a405B65Bimid=2Bc7a37G2:Bbe416eG4f0b273G7g!n m=mmillerM40molehillgroiip.corr 



Thanks. 

The FacebookTeam 



This message was intended for mmiller^molehillgroup.com . If you do not wish to receive this type of email from Facebook in the future, please click 
on the link beiow to unsubscribe. 

http://www.facebook.com/o.php?k^aa4gbe&u^5B355723a&mid^2Bc7aB7G2abe416eG4fqb273G7 
Facebook, Inc. P.O. Box 10005, Palo Aito, CA 94303 



_zi 



C(J See more about: Facebook, 



Figure 13.9. An event invitation sent via email. 



192 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 



Creating New Events 



What if you're hosting an event, be that a block party or family reunion, 
and want to let friends know about it? It's time now to learn how to create 
Facebook events— and invite your friends. 

Follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and select Events in the sidebar. 

2. From the Events page, click the Create an Event button. 

3. When the Create Event page appears, as shown in Figure 13.10, click the 
controls in the When section to set the start date and time for the event. 




Create an Event 



r Add Event Photo 



When? I Today H 9:30 pm \V\ Add end time 

What are you planning? 

Where? 



Add street a 



select Guests 

l^l Anyone can view and R5VP [public event) 
L^l Show the guest list on the event page 



Facebook £> 2010 ■ English (US) 



About * Advertising Developers Privacy 'Terms ■ Help 



Figure 13.10. Creating a new Facebook event. 



4. To set the end time for the event, click the Add End Time link to display the 
End Time section and then use the controls to set the end date and time. 



5. Type the name of the event into the What 
Are You Planning? box. 

6. Type the location of the event into the 
Where? box. 

7. Add any additional information about the 
event into the More Info? box. 

8. To invite friends to your event, click the 
Select Guests button. When the Select 
Guests dialog box appears, as shown in 



[> 



Note 



You can enter an exact 
address as the event's 
location, or just a city or 
state, or even just "My 
House" or "Room 223 
in the Henry Building." It 
doesn't matter. 



Creating New Events 1 93 

Figure 13.11, click those Facebook friends you want to invite or enter the 
email addresses of non-Facebook invitees, then click the Save and Close 
button. 




Invite bv E-j 



Use commas to separate e-mals 



Add a Personal Message 



Figure 13.11. Inviting friends to an event. 



9. 



10. 



Back on the Create Event page, you have the option of making this a pub- 
lic or private event. To make this a public event that all Facebook members 
can view, check the Anyone Can View and RSVP (Public Event) option. To 
make this a private event, open to invitees only, uncheck this option. 



By default, the guest list is displayed on the event page. Your guests might 
not always want their presence known; to hide this guest list, uncheck the 
Show Guest List on the Event Page option. 

11. Click the Create Event button. 



That's it. You've now created your event and invited some guests. To 
invite more guests or just monitor who's attending, navigate to the event's 
Facebook page and do what you need to do there. 



194 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 

Viewing Your Events 

Where do you find the pages for those events you've created or have been 
invited to? All you have to do is go to the Facebook Home page and click 
the Events link in the sidebar. 

This displays the Events page, shown in Figure 13.12, which shows all 
events to which you've been invited. Your RSVP status— whether you've 
accepted or declined the invitation — is displayed beside each event listed. 
To display the Facebook page for an event, click the event title in the list. 



03 Events 

August 




+ Create an Event 




Lance Family Reunion 

August2Sat5:0rjpm 

Dinah Lance invited you ■ 1 guest 

October 




Respond 


Falcons youth soccer game 

31 1 October 9 at 9 :30am 

Tom French, Michael Miller, and 1 other guest 


Attending 


Events Help ■ Export Events 




1 « 1 ► 1 





Figure 13.12. The Facebook Events page. 

And here's something else you might find useful. Many users find that 
they're interested in events their friends are attending. To display your 
friends' events, go to the Events page and click the Friends' Events link in 
the sidebar. This displays your friend's upcoming events. Click an event title 
to view its Facebook page— and if you like what you see, RSVP from there. 



Celebrating Birthdays 



Facebook knows a lot about you and your friends, including when you were 
born. To that end, Facebook does a nice little social service by letting you 
know when someone's birthday is nigh. 



Celebrating Birthdays 195 



First off, Facebook notifies you when it's one of your friends' birthday. The 
notice pops up in the Events section of your Home page, in the top right 
corner, as shown in Figure 13.13. 



What are you planning? 

,Jj3 1 event invitation 

EG Dinah Lance's birthday, See All 



Figure 13. 13. Today's birthdays on your Facebook Home page. 



To get a bit more notice of upcoming birthdays, click the Events link in 
the sidebar of the Home page to display the Events page and then click 
Birthdays in the sidebar. This lists all upcoming birthdays, soonest first, as 
shown in Figure 13.14. 



H3 Birthdays 

Today 



+ Createan Event 



Dinah Lance 

35 years old 



February 



F3 



Rudolf o Lasperi 

Friday, February 4 ■ 33 years old 



Michael Miller 

Monday, February 14 ■ 53 years old 



Bob Miller 

Friday, March 4 ■ 23 years old 



Michael Michards 

Tuesday, March S ■ 43 years old 



Figure 13. 14. A list of upcoming birthdays. 



And when it's someone's birthday, don't be shy about celebrating. Go to 
that friends' Profile page and leave them a happy birthday message. It's 
what people do on Facebook! 



196 CHAPTER 13 Sharing Birthdays and Events 



Selling Tickets 

Facebook's Events feature is a good way to put events on your sched- 
ule, but it isn't perfect. While it's adequate for inviting friends to a pri- 
vate party, or letting people know about a big public gathering, it isn't 
that great when you're hosting an event that requires tickets to get in. 
That's right, Facebook doesn't let you sell (or give away) tickets to your 
event. 

There's a way around this limitation, however, thanks to Facebook's 
integration with services like Eventbrite, EventPay, and Ticketing. These 
are services that make it easy to promote and sell tickets for events 
online. You can connect your Facebook event with the ticketing site, 
and then use that site to sell tickets to your event. Some of these 
sites even put "order tickets" links into your News Feed posts for new 
events. (Most also charge a fee, typically a small percentage of the 
ticket price.) 

You activate these ticketing applications from within Facebook. Just 
enter the application's name into the search box and you see a link for 
that app; click the link to go to the application's Facebook page. When 
you're there, click the Go to Application button to get more instructions. 

Let's look at Eventbrite as an example of how this all works. After you go 
to the Eventbrite page and click Go to Application, you see a long page 
that contains all the instructions you need to create a new ticketed event. 
Click the Create an Event button on this page to create an Eventbrite event, 
complete with ticket information. After you've created the event, Eventbrite 
invites selected friends to your event, and posts an update about the event 
to Facebook, where it appears in your friends' News Feeds. It's really quite 
simple. 



Part V 



Doing More with 
Facebook 



14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 

15 Becoming a Fan 

16 Meeting Others in Groups 

17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 

18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 

19 Using Facebook on the Go 

20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook 
Marketplace 



This page intentionally left blank 



Chapter 1 £L 



Personalizing Your 
Profile Page 

Your Profile page is your personal page on Facebook. I'd 
say it's like a home page, except that Facebook's real Home 
page is something different. So while your Profile page might 
be your "home," it's actually a place where all your personal 
information is stored and displayed for your friends to see. 

As such, wouldn't be nice if you could personalize your 
Profile page to better reflect your personality? Well, while 
you can't change the page's colors or backgrounds or how it 
looks in general, there are some things you can personalize. 
That's what we discuss in this chapter. 

What Can You Personalize on Your 
Profile Page— and Why Would You 
Want To? 

Before we look at what you can personalize on your Profile 
page, let's take another look at what's actually on the page. 
As you can see in Figure 14.1, your Profile picture is at the 
top left, with a sidebar full of informational boxes beneath 
it. The center of the page hosts a series of tabs, with the 
main Wall tab displaying your latest status updates, as well 
as posts made to you by your friends; other tabs on your 
Profile page hold your personal information, photos, videos, 
events, and so forth. Finally, there's a column on the right 
that displays a bunch of advertisements. (Along with birthday 
reminders, recommendations, and the like, of course.) 



200 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 




Dinah Lance 

Wil Lifo PlMjtui + 



What's on your mind? 



ttS'igfli 



] jJTivCTyLijLe. (StJ.) 



RrblmrrfipJibihra 



Brthday: 
Ju.= 2S r 1975 
Cm i ml QLy: 
La Job, LA 



Dinah I ancp Rring Int-^ of stuff m pat! 
I nnrf rnmily Rr-iinjon 
Safcrday, August % BJ LU at i sIMom 
KefClM 

Bfl 1 J mnutts ago ■ twimmt ■ Liu 'Shafe ■ In-nlc guests 
Hob Mfcr ill Mao, Kan-Lan! 

'.n-f 14,iC 5:ft!*m Crnm-nt ■ Ifcr Sr* Wnl-ta-Wnl 



Dinah Lance Can you believe the weather today? 

lr^ I4tt4:S5p 



Dinah Lance I'm happy with things right now 

lr^ 14rtM: r J r <ar, Coimrnl ■ ike 




Figure 14.1. A typical Profile page. 

Ignoring the column of ads, we can focus on the sidebar and the tabs, 
both of which are somewhat customizable. You can, for example, select 
which information boxes appear in the sidebar, and in which order. You can 
choose who can post to your Wall, as well as who can read your Wall post- 
ings. Finally, you can add a variety of new tabs, and arrange your tabs in 
any order. In short, you decide what people see— and what people post— on 
your Profile page. 



Choosing What Posts to Display on Your 
Wall 

Let's start with the posts on your Wall. By default, your wall displays your 
status updates, as well as public messages left by your friends. You can, 
however, opt to display only your status updates, or only messages from 
your friends. To do this, follow these steps: 

1. On your Profile page, make sure the Wall tab is selected. 

2. Click the Options link under the Publisher box; three options display, as 
shown in Figure 14.2. The default option is to display posts from You + 
Friends. 



Changing Other Wall Settings 201 







What's on your mind? 


Attach: S| ■£■ [5] £j 




flT t" I 


3 Just Dinah 


Just Friends 


O Settings 



Figure 14.2. Choosing what posts are displayed on your Wall. 

3. To display only your own posts, click Just You. 

4. To display only messages left to you by others, click Just Friends. 



Changing Other Wall Settings 



While we're on the Wall, Facebook lets you configure quite a lot about what 
goes on your wall and who can put it there. You can change any and all of 
the following: 

• Stories Posted by You. This setting lets you import posts (what Facebook 
calls "stories") from other sites, such as YouTube, Flickr, and Digg. When 
you post something to one of these sites, it also appears as a status 
update on Facebook. 

• Profile Story Comments. By default, comments to your Wall posts are 
automatically expanded. If you prefer a cleaner look— with comments hid- 
den (but displayed when a link is clicked)— you can turn off expanded 
comments. 

• Stories Posted by Friends. You can choose to let friends post to your 
wall, or not. You can also choose who can see posts made by your friends. 

You access these settings by following these steps: 

1. On your Profile page, make sure the Wall tab is selected. 

2. Click the Options link under the Publisher box. 

3. Click the Settings button. This displays the settings panel shown in Figure 
14.3. 

4. To display posts from another website in your Facebook feed, go to the 
Imported Stories section and click a specific site. This expands this section 
to display a User name box for that site; enter your user name and click 
the Import button. 



202 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 



What's on your mind? 



Attach: [g| ■£• [5] £D fl-r 



Dinah + Friends Just Dinah Just Friends 



Stories Posted bv Vou 



Imported Stories: Available Sites 

•• Flidcr Sfl Oigg Q Picasa ^ Delicious fc Velp 
£33 Google Reader £3 YouTube ^ Last.fm [F] Pandora 
O Photobucket h hulu Blog/RSS t Kiva 

Profile Story Comments 

Auto-Expand Comments: g] Comments on stories will be expanded by default 

Stories Posted bv Friends 

Posting Ability: g] Friends may post to my Wall 

Who can see posts made I Q Friends of Friends - I 

by friends? 



[7] Show posts from friends in the default view 
Application settings 

You can control which applications can post stories on your Wall on the application settings page. 



Figure 14.3. Customizing Wall settings. 

5. All comments on your Wall are expanded by default. To not automatically 
expand comments, uncheck the Comments on Stories Will Be Expanded 
by Default option. 

6. By default, your friends are allowed to post on your wall. If you don't want 
them posting, uncheck the Friends May Post to My Wall option. 

7. To determine who can view Wall posts made by your friends, click the 
button in the Who Can See Posts Made by Friends? section, and select 
the appropriate option — Everyone, Friends of Friends, Friends Only, or, to 
select a custom list of friends, Customize. 

8. By default, posts from your friends are displayed in line with your own sta- 
tus updates on your Wall. To not display friends' posts, uncheck the Show 
Posts from Friends in the Default View. (This is the same as selecting Just 
You when you first click Options.) 

You don't have to click a "save" button or anything when you're done; your 
changes are applied as soon as you select them. 



Changing Your Profile Picture 203 



Changing Your Profile Picture 



Here's something you'll probably end up changing quite a bit overtime— the 
picture you display on your Profile page. Fortunately, Facebook makes it 
easy to change your Profile picture, at any point in time. Here's how to do it: 

1. From your Profile page, point to your picture and click the Change Picture 
link that appears. 

2. This displays a pop-up menu, as shown in Figure 14.4. Select how you 
want to obtain the picture: Upload a Picture (from your computer), Take a 
Picture (from your computer's webcam), or Choose from Album (to use a 
picture previously uploaded to Facebook). 





^^p^^lKJ Edit your Profile Picture 


l^^TH W\W ^m^^^ c 

Edit My Profile 


*» Upload a Picture m 

Cl Take a Picture 

DE Choose from Album j 

„■/ Edit Thumbnail 

X Remove your Picture 







Figure 14.4. Changing your Profile picture. 

J. If you selected Upload a Picture, Facebook displays the Upload Your 
Profile Picture window, shown in Figure 14.5. Click the Choose File or 
Open button to display the Choose File to Upload dialog box. Navigate to 
and select the picture you want to use and then click the Open button. 







Upload Your Prafie Pkture 




Selo-L lsi image file uit yuur ujinjuler (*3 


IB mux): 

se... 1 




[ Brow 


By upba: - : a fit . . DHt fy d^t you have ttae right Id dstrib 
violate the Terms ct Service. 


he ihe pctwe and that h does not 






Cancel 









Figure 14.5. Getting ready to upload a new Profile picture. 



If you selected Take a Picture, Facebook displays the Take a Profile Picture 
window, shown in Figure 14.6. Look into your webcam lens and smile and 
then click the camera button. You get a three-second countdown before 
the picture is snapped. If you like it, click the Save Picture button. 



204 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 




Figure 14.6. Taking a new Profile picture with a webcam. 



If you selected Choose from Album, Facebook displays your Profile 

Pictures album page, shown in Figure 14.7. Click the photo you want to 

use; this displays the selected photo on its 

own page. Click the Make Profile Picture 

link to make this picture your new Profile 

picture. 



rl3 



You can also edit the thumbnail version of 
your Profile picture that appears next to your 
status updates. To do this, point to your 
Profile picture, click Change Picture, and 
then select Edit Thumbnail. When the Edit 
Thumbnail dialog box appears, as shown in 
Figure 14.8, click and drag the thumbnail until 
it looks the way you want and then click the 
Save button. 



L^TTip 



To remove the current Pro- 
file picture without replacing 
it with a new picture (result- 
ing in a blank space where 
your picture should be), 
point to your Profile picture, 
click Change Picture, and 
then select Remove Your 
Picture. 



Customizing the Tabs on Your Profile Page 205 



Your Photos - Profile Pictures 

Bad; to Profile 



15 photos Edit Photos Change Profile Picture 




Figure 14.7. Choosing a new Profile picture from your Profile Pictures album. 




1 



image to adjust. 



9 Cancel 



Figure 14.8. Editing the thumbnail version of your Profile picture. 



Customizing the Tabs on Your Profile Page 

Facebook uses tabs to display different types of information on your Profile 
page. By default, Facebook displays three tabs: Wall, Info, and Photos. You 
can add new tabs at any time, and then rearrange the order of the tabs. For 
example, you might want to add a tab to hold any home videos you upload, 
or to display your events, or to host information from an application you're 
using. 



206 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 



To add a new tab, follow these steps: 

1. From your Profile page, click the + tab at the end of the row of tabs. 

2. This displays a menu of available tabs, as shown in Figure 14.9. Click the 
tab you want to add. 



Wall Info Photos 



Add a new tab 



What's on your mind? 



Attach: B * E] g 



Dinah Lance Bring lots 
Lance Family I 
Saturday, Augus 
K of C Hall 



fll Links 

El Events 

D Notes 

IS" Video 



Search available tabs: 



Figure 14.9. Adding a new tab to your Profile page. 

Pretty simple, really. The new tab is added to 
the end of your previous tabs. To rearrange the 
order of your tabs, click a tab with your mouse 
and drag that tab to a new position. 

Managing Sidebar Boxes 



(1&Ti? 



Facebook displays up to 
a half-dozen tabs on your 
Profile page. If you have 
more than six tabs, you 
can view the others by 
clicking the right arrow tab 
and selecting the tabs from 
the list. 



Now we come to your Profile page's side- 
bar, which displays various bits of personal 
information in individual boxes. There are two 
boxes that are always displayed on every per- 
son's Profile page: Information and Friends. These boxes cannot be moved 
or deleted. 



Adding New Boxes 

You can, however, add other boxes to the sidebar. New boxes are typically 
added by the Facebook applications you use. For example, if you're using 
the FamilyLink app, you get a FamilyLink box in your sidebar. 

To add a box for a given application, follow these steps: 

1. From the Facebook toolbar, click Account and then select Application 
Settings. 



Managing Sidebar Boxes 207 

2. When the Application Settings page appears, scroll down to the applica- 
tion you want to add and then click Edit Settings for that app. 

3. When the Edit Application dialog box appears, make sure the Profile tab is 
selected, as shown in Figure 14.10. 



~!r ' 



Edit Gifts Settings 



Profile Bookmark Additional Permissions 



Box: Available :>cici; 

Privacy: I fl Everyone ▼ 



This setting controls the visibility of Gifts's Box or 
Tab on your Profile. 



L 



-'JSi L'tL~!>'. 






Figure 14.10. Adding a sidebar box for an application. 



4. If the application lets you add a box to your Profile page, there will be a 
Box: Available section. Click the Add link to add a box for this app. 

5. Click the Okay button. 

Rearranging Boxes 

You can also rearrange the boxes in your sidebar— save for the Information 
and Friends boxes, of course; they're fixed in place. To reposition a box, 
point to the title bar of that box until the cursor changes to a four-headed 
arrow; drag the box to a new position. 

Deleting Boxes 

You can delete any box from your sidebar. (Except for Information and 
Friends, natch.) To remove a box from your sidebar, click the Edit Box (pen- 
cil) icon for that box and select Remove Box from the pop-up menu. That's 
it. 



Editing What You See in Sidebar Boxes 

Some of the boxes in your sidebar contain information that can be edited. 
To edit the information in a given box, click the Edit Box (pencil) icon for that 
box. This typically displays a menu of items or options, such as the one in 



208 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 



Figure 14.11. All boxes have their own unique sets of options, but in general 
you check those items you want to display and uncheck those you don't. If 
additional editing can be done, look for and click the Edit Information link in 
the menu and then follow the onscreen instructions. 



Information 

Relationship Status: 
In a Relationship 
Birthday: 
June 23, 1975 
Current City: 
La Jolla, CA 



Friends 

5 friends 



Q Find people you know 



Show: 

F71 Relationship Status 

□ Siblings 
S Birthday 
S Current City 
LJ Hometown 

□ Political Views 

I I Religious Views 
Edit Information 



Figure 14.11. Determining what information is displayed in the Information box. 



Editing Your Profile Information 



Speaking of information, one of the default tabs on your Profile page is the 
Info tab. This tab displays information about you in the following section: 
About Me, Work and Education, Likes and Dislikes, and Contact Information. 

You can easily edit the information displayed on this tab. Follow these steps: 

1. From your Profile page, select the Info tab. 

2. Click the Edit link for the About Me section. 

3. When the next page appears, as shown in Figure 14.12, make any changes 
or additions to the information there, then click the Save changes button. 

4. Back on the Info tab, click the Edit link for the Work and Education section. 

5. When the next page appears, as shown in Figure 14.13, make any changes 
or additions to the information there and then click the Save Changes but- 
ton. 



6. Back on the Info tab, click the Edit link for the Likes and Dislikes section. 



Editing Your Profile Information 209 



Dinah Lance 














| 4 View My Profile | 


Current City: 
Horn e to v> n : 














^ La Jolla, California 








*\ 












bu, Seattle, Washington 








x| 












Sex: 












[71 Show my sex in my profile 


Female Q 


Birthday: 












Show my full birthday in my profile. |~t1 


Jun | w | 23 | -w | 1375 


Hi 


Interested In: 
Looking For 


□ Women 
[7] Men 

[7] Friendship 

□ Dating 

□ A Relationship 
| | Networking 












Political Views: 
Religious Views: 














Democratic Party 










Christian 




















Bmk 














I am a fun loving person. 


I like dogs and cat and have a rich family life. 


/, 













Figure 14.12. Editing personal information. 



Dinah Lance 



i View My Profile 



High School: La Jolla Country Day School 

Add Another High School 
College/University: H Boston University 



£| Business Management 

I 



Attended for (*) College 

© Graduate School 



Add Another School 



Employer; _ Young Life 



Time Period: Q I currently work here. 



1983 



19SS 



una Life 




* 








Position; 


_ Fundraiser 


x 








City/Town: 












Description: 


si 



Figure 14. 13. Editing work and school information. 



210 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 

7. When the next page appears, as shown in Figure 14.14, make any 
changes or additions to the information there and then click the Save 
Changes button. 









Dinah Lance 


| 4 View Mv Profile | 






^Bk Underwater basket 

fca weaving 


Activities 


What do you like to do? 




Underwater basket weaving 










Digital photography 


Interests 


What are your interests? 




Digital photography 










Hf^fl Hikki Yanofsky 


Music 


What music do you like? 




( PAfcYancfeky ) 

See more (1) 










K£ The Mouse and the 

p,-.',,,./ ■ Motorcycle 


Books 


What books do you like? 




i The Mouse and the Motorcycle i 










B— "-*- 


Movies 


What movies do you like? 




Batman ; The Dark Knight 







Figure 14. 14. Editing your likes and dislikes. 

8. Back on the Info tab, click the Edit link for the Contact and Information sec- 
tion. 

9. When the next page appears, as shown in Figure 14.15, make any changes 
or additions to the information there and then click the Save Changes but- 
ton. 



That's pretty much it. You don't have to enter any particular piece of infor- 
mation; in fact, you probably don't want to enter everything, especially 
detailed contact information. It's nice to be a little discreet. 



Editing Your Profile Information 21 1 



Dinah Lance < view hv Profile 



Emails: 

Add / Remove Emails 



IH Screen Name(s): aim [~^~\ 

Add another screen name 



Mobile Phone: United States (+1) [T| 




Land Phone: United States (+1) [T| 






Address 




Ov/Town: La Job, United States 




Neighborhood: 




zip: r 











Website: 


/. 































Figure 14.15. Editing your contact information. 



Telling People About Yourself 

How much personal information you display on Facebook is a source of 
great debate. Some people fill out each and every box in excruciating 
detail, choosing to tell everybody everything about themselves; others 
leave most of the boxes unfilled, choosing to keep their personal lives 
private. 

Just how much personal information should you divulge to your 
Facebook friends? That depends. 

I think it's okay to list your favorite movies and books and such; there's 
little harm in letting people know what you like to read and watch and 
listen to. Likewise, it's probably okay to list your past employers and 
where you went to school and such. This is all relatively public informa- 
tion anyway, plus it's a good way to help the people you used to work 
and study with find you on Facebook. 



212 CHAPTER 14 Personalizing Your Profile Page 



That said, you don't want to enter any information that could harm you 
in terms of job prospects, family relations, and the like. Does a potential 
employer (who might be a staunch conservative) really need to know 
that you're a dyed-in-the-wool liberal? Will listing that you like to lis- 
ten to Bobby Sherman and the Archies poison your chances at a new 
job— or with a potential suitor, if you're dating? It's hard to say, but I do 
know that some people will form an opinion of you based on what you 
like and dislike. Rightly or wrongly, the personal information you list on 
Facebook could work against you. 

Then there's the whole issue of contact information, which really is a lot 
simpler. Unless you want to encourage old flames and new stalkers, don't 
list any contact information. Let them send you a Facebook message, 
but don't encourage contact outside of Facebook. Your less-than-close 
Facebook friends don't need to be able to call you up or drop by your 
house. Leave the social networking online, where it belongs. 



Chapter 1 Jl 



Becoming a Fan 



Do you like a given entertainer? I mean, do you really, really 
like him? Well, on Facebook you can "like" a celebrity in a 
way that lets you become a kind of friend of that person, 
receiving his status updates in your News Feed and letting 
you participate in discussions on his Facebook page. 

The same thing with consumer-oriented companies, prod- 
ucts, and brands. You can choose to "like" Starbucks cof- 
fee, Ludwig drums, Ford cars, you name it. This puts you on 
the list for all sorts of promotional status updates fed to your 
News Feed, which can be either informative or highly annoy- 
ing, depending on what's sent your way and how interested 
in it you are. 

In essence, then, Facebook lets you become a fan of the 
entertainers, celebrities, and companies you like. And that 
can be fun. 

Understanding Fan Pages 

Facebook offers something it calls pages for public figures 
and companies— musicians, actors, entertainers, writers, 
celebrities, and the like. A page— what I'll call a fan page 
to distinguish it from the generic use of the word — is the 
Facebook face of that person or company, kind of a super 
Profile page. 

The Fan Page as Fan Club 

I like to think of a Facebook fan page as an online fan club. 
They both function in much the same way, focusing on a 
particular person or group, disseminating information from 
and about the topic at hand, and encourage discussions 



214 CHAPTER 15 Becoming a Fan 

among club/page members. There are no in-person meetings, of course, 
but a Facebook fan page is essentially your official contact to the person or 
organization at hand. 

It makes sense, then, that most major musical acts have fan pages on the 
Facebook site. Subscribe to the Carole King page, for example, and you can 
find information about her tours and album projects, view recent photos of 
the artist, and participate in discussions with fellow fans. (Figure 15.1 shows 
Ms. King's page.) It's just like being in a fan club, except on Facebook. 



Carole King See you in Wilkes-Barre Monday! ■-_,- is -_ -.;=,■ 
Wall Info Tour Photos J3 Musk Boxes » 




On Tour 

Jun 2S Carole King at Wilkes-Barre Township, Pennsylvania 

Iwi 30 Carole King at New York, New York 

Jul 03 Carole King at Lenox, Massachusetts 

Jul 04 Carole King at Worcester, Massachusetts 

Jul 07 Carole King at Cleveland, Ohio 

Jul 14 Carole King at Denver, Colorado 

lulls Carole King at Salt Lake City, Utah 

Jul 17 Carole King at Las Vegas, Nevada 

Id 20 Carole King at Anaheim, California 



ik Cfick to iLike 



Get Ring tones > 



Come to my town! 



Featured Songs 

Displaying all 4 featured songs 



Official website 
Carole King on iLike 
Carole King on MySpace 
Ringtones 

Carole King Facebook Page 



Figure 15.1. Carole King's Facebook fan page. 



A fan page for a product or company is similar, although I'm not sure "fan" 
is the best word to use; maybe "loyal customer" would be better. The 
Starbucks page, for example, is pretty much all promotion, all the time. As 
you can see in Figure 15.2, there's information about Starbucks drinks and 
Starbucks stores and the Starbucks card, along with photos of said drinks 
and stores and cards. You get status updates, mainly promotional messages, 
from the folks at Starbucks. And there's a discussion forum where you can 
express your love for Frappaccinos and such to your fellow devotees. 



Understanding Fan Pages 215 




Starbucks 

Wall Info 

Bask Info 

Founded: 
Detailed Info 

Website : 
Company Overview: 



Starbucks Card Around The.. 



1971 in Seattle's Pike Place Market 



Instant Story Photos » 



Suggest to Friends 
Subscribe via SMS 



Follow Starbucks on Twitter: 
http ://twitter . com/Starbucks 



Buy Starbucks Coffee Online; 
http://www.starbuck3st0re.com/ 



Founded: 

1571 in Seattle's Pike Place Market 



5 Friends Like This 



http : //www .Starbucks. com 

Starbucks has an unusually human approach to business. We always 
figured that putting people before products just made good common 
sense. Our relationships with farmers yield the highest quality coffees. 
The connections we make in communities create a loyal following. Our 
ability to accomplish what we set out to do is based primarily on the 
people we hire - we call each other 'partners . ' We are always focused 
on our people. 

Establish Starbucks as the premier purveyor of the finest coffee in the 
world while maintaining our uncompromising principles as we grow. 



Products: 
Facebook Page: 



Handcrafted beverages and fulfilled 'partners' 
http://www.facebook.com/Starbucks 



Figure 15.2. The Facebook fan page for Starbucks. 

Liking a Page 

Instead of "friending" a fan page, you instead opt to "like" it. You do this by 
clicking the Like button on the page; it's easy to do. When you like a page, 
you essentially subscribe to it, so that all of the status updates to that page 
appear in your News Feed on your Home page. Like I said, it's just like 
becoming a friend of that person or company, just without using the f-word. 



Navigating a Fan Page 

As you might suspect, a fan page is very similar to a standard Facebook 
personal Profile page. Fan pages have similar sections as do regular Profile 
pages, with a few extra features added. The typical fan page includes a side- 
bar along the left side, complete with photo, information box, list of group 
members, and other relevant information. 

The center of the page has a familiar series of tabs. There's a Wall tab, with 
updates from the admins; an Info tab, with information about the target 
person or organization; and Photos tab, with any photos uploaded by the 
admins or people who subscribe to the page. 



216 CHAPTER 15 Becoming a Fan 

There are also a few tabs that you don't find on a standard Profile page but 
are necessary to foster discussion among the page's fans. Most common is 
the Discussions tab, like the one shown in Figure 15.3, which is kind of like 
a message forum or bulletin board. (Not all fan pages display a Discussions 
tab.) 



£\]|lil Bruce Springsteen 






Wall Info Boxes Photos ,: Musk 

Displaying topics 1-31 out of 553. See All Topics 


Discussions » 


| + Start Hew Topic | 


LYRIC GAME 

2045 posts. Created on January 23, 2009 at 10:01am 
Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 3 9 10 11 ... Last Page 




Latest post by Rick Combi 
Posted 3 hours ago 


When were ycu hooked. 

7 posts. Created on June Z5 r 2Q1Q at 2:12pm 




Latest post by Chris Turner 
Posted 5 hours ago 


Born to Run - Broadway bound? 

1 post. Created 3 hours ago 




Latest post by Vidd Lucas Ozarowski 
Posted 3 hours ago 


the 2010 live tour 

7 posts. Created on June 26 r 20 10 at 7: 12am 




Latest post by l^T" Jin 
Posted 12 hours ago 


WHO SHOU LD PLAY BRUCE IN HIS LIFE STORY 
MOVIE? 

45 posts. Created on February 15 r 2010 at 12: 16am 
Page 1 1 




Latest post by Lissa Fiel 
Posted 13 hours ago 


U rg e n t! En tertain m en t Com m u n ity Will You 
Listen, please? 

1 post. Created 17 hours ago 




Latest post by Cathy Castro 
Posted 17 hours ago 



Figure 15.3. A fan page's Discussions tab. 



Finding Fan Pages 



So how do you find fan pages on Facebook? By searching for it, of course. 
Just follow these steps: 

1. Enter one or more keywords that describe the entertainer or company in 
the search box in the Facebook toolbar and then click the Search button. 

2. When the search results page appears, as shown in Figure 15.4, click the 
Pages link in the sidebar. 

3. To view a specific fan page, click the Page's name. 

4. To subscribe to the page, click the Like link. 



Q> All Results 



Ji^ People 



[ill Groups 
1^1 Applications 
fv\ Events 

Web Results 
W\ Posts by Friends 
|T= I Posts by Everyone 



Creating Your Own Fan Page 21 7 



Did you mean: folk 











Show: 


All Page Types 


__S 




kJ^M 


pfrt"l Name: 


Folk music 

Page 

203,225 people like this. 


Like 










Old Town School of Folk Musk 

Local Business 
3,752 people like this. 



(?rqlk f%:sic 



Folk Music 

Page 

153 people like this. 



Figure 15.4. Searching for fan pages. 



Creating Your Own Fan Page 



Fan pages are designed for public figures and organizations to broadcast 
information to their fans. In fact, Facebook requires you to be an official 
representative of a given organization or person to create a fan page for 
that organization or person. So you can't just up and create a fan page for 
Mountain Dew, for example, or for the Doobie Brothers. That's something for 
the Dews or the Doobies to do for themselves. 

That said, you can create a Facebook fan page for your own business or 
organization. Let's say, for example, that you help run a community youth 
soccer league. Assuming you have the approval of league officials, you can 
create a fan page for your league. Same thing if you run a local business; 
you can easily create a Facebook fan page for your company. 

In fact, a Facebook fan page is a great way to keep in touch with your most 
loyal customers. You can use your fan page to announce new products and 
promotions, hold contests, and solicit customer opinions. Obviously, you can 
also link to your main website from your fan page, so customers can find out 
more information at the source. 



218 CHAPTER 15 Becoming a Fan 

Create a New Page 

Here's how to create a fan page: 

1. Navigate to www.facebook.com/pages/. 

2. When the Browse All Pages page appears, click the Create Page button at 
the top of the page. 

3. When the Create a Page page appears, as shown in Figure 15.5, select the 
category for your page: Local Business; Brand, Product, or Organization; or 
Artist, Band, or Public Figure. 



Create a Page 



Official Page 

conrnuncaw! wdi y«r ajstwwfi and fans bv ETaaara and maruanx) an offload 



crrpatp n pan* 1 fnr I : 

a Local business: 

Local Huoness 



Ld 



Bf«*l r (tchJul!.. oi LTfjjirjd'j-jn 
O AittL.twpd^Lfpiiitflpjc 



]Wi die offoal represenraove of the person, buaneKr band or 
product and have penrtsxin to Creole thrs I'acte. 



MWM.WIJW 



Coin ill unity Page 

Generate support for volt ravrxne cause er tope by crealmj a CammLWtY 
i^Kje. ]f it bet ernes very popJar (ottr acting thousands of farts}, it .vl be 
»VfirriH And rnrtntnr^rf hy Che fivrbouTk 



(m-pta: tte Dim 5-«k HKydro) 



■tJJJ,.i.lJi..l I...JJ.IIJ 



Create a group instead/ 

CorTrmrutic rietHy with oPJih Fatrtmok no 
mterect et hobby. Creaie a Faceboofe ojeup 



v vAt> dia r » rjt ofeLunT'^' 



Figure 15.5. Creating a new fan page. 

4. After you select the category, select the type of page you're creating from 
the list that appears. For example, if you're creating a page for a local busi- 
ness, you'd select the Local category and then make a further selection 
from the drop-down list: Automotive, Banking and Financial Service, Bar, 
Cafe, Club, and so on. 

5. Enter the name of your page into the Page Name box. 

6. Check the box stating you are the official representative of this person, 
business, band, or product and have permission to create this page. 

7. Click the Create Official Page button. 



That's it. You're now the proud owner of a brand new Facebook fan page. 



Creating Your Own Fan Page 21 9 



Invite Others to Become Fans 

Just having a fan page isn't enough, however. 
You also need to get yourself some fans. 

Probably the best way to get fans is to invite 
them. Here's how to invite your current friends 
to become fans of your new page: 

1. Navigate to your fan page and click the 
Suggest to Friends link in the sidebar. 

2. When the Suggest to Friends window 
appears, as shown in Figure 15.6, click the 
names of friends you'd like to invite to be 
fans. 

3. Click the Send Invitations button. 



Suggest Big Mike's Yogurt A Go Go to friends. 



Your friends will receive a suggestion from you to like this Page. 



Find Friends: StartTyping a Name 



Filter Friends -r WW Selected ['0} 








- 




H Cindy Mooers I ■ Julie French 


n 


David Du 








Shellye A. 
Kaplin 

Bob Miller 




^ Steve Searcy i Kathleen 
P Kinlev 




B Jane Anik Rahman 
■ Flanders Neel 

1*7 m 1 


r^tf 



L^Note 

Inviting friends isn't the 
only way to get new fans, 
of course. Facebook 
lets you promote your 
fan page by purchas- 
ing advertisements for it. 
(These are some of the 
ads that appear on the 
right side of your Profile 
page.) That's a whole 
other topic, however, best 
left for another book. 






Figure 15.6. Inviting your friends to become fans. 



Your friends will receive the invitations you send, and if they wish, can 
respond and choose to "like" your new page. 



220 CHAPTER 15 Becoming a Fan 



Community Pages 

Facebook also offers a special type of fan page called a community 
page. These are pages for general topics or causes. For example, you 
can create a community page to support a candidate for elected office 
or to support a grassroots charitable movement. Unlike normal fan 
pages, you don't have to be an official representative to create a com- 
munity page. 

You create a community page the same way you create a standard fan 
page. Follow the previous steps until you get to the Create a Page page, 
where you see a Community Page section on the right side. Enter the 
desired name of the page into the Page Name box and then click the 
Create Community Page button. From there, it's pretty much like man- 
aging a regular fan page. 

Don't confuse these types of community pages with those topic-ori- 
ented pages that Facebook also calls community pages. This second 
type of community page is a Facebook-generated page that gathers 
user-generated information about a specific topic or experience. For 
example, Facebook has a community page for Cooking that displays 
basic information about cooking, as well as posts from your friends that 
mention cooking. It's kind of like a Facebook-oriented Wikipedia; in 
fact, many of these community pages include information loaned from 
Wikipedia. 

Facebook's intent with these topic-oriented community pages is to help 
you connect with others who share similar interests. I suppose that 
might work. But these community pages are too new to fully judge their 
effectiveness. 

My initial opinion is that in creating topic-oriented pages, Facebook 
might have misjudged why people use their site. To me, Facebook is 
all about connecting with past and current friends; it's less about look- 
ing up general information that you can find elsewhere. I suppose you 
can use community pages to make new friends, but Facebook's other 
features— such as fan pages and groups, which we discuss in the next 
chapter— are much better for this task. 



Chapter 1 K 



Meeting Others in 
Groups 



In the last chapter we talked about fan pages, those 
Facebook pages that are kind of like fan clubs for entertain- 
ers, celebrities, and companies. But fan clubs aren't the only 
kind of clubs out there; depending on your tastes and inter- 
ests, you might be enticed to participate in a quilting club, 
or a photography club, or a chess club, or a club for Harley 
Davidson enthusiasts. It's all part of the social experience, 
after all, getting together— even if virtually— with others who 
share your interests. 

As you might suspect, the millions of people who use 
Facebook share quite a few interests in common. If you're 
interested in coin collecting, for example, chances are 
there are more than a handful of other coin collectors on 
Facebook. The key is locating those people and then finding 
a forum for your communication and get-togethers. 

Which is where Facebook groups come in. A Facebook 
group is an online club for users who share a common inter- 
est—and chances are you can find at least one group to par- 
ticipate in. 

Understanding Facebook Groups 

If you want to make some new friends on Facebook, one 
of the best ways to do it is to search out others who share 
your interests. If you're into gardening, look for gardeners. 
If you're into hang gliding, look for hang gliders. If you're a 
wine lover, look for other connoisseurs of the grape. 



222 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 

On Facebook, people who are interested in a given topic or hobby can con- 
gregate in virtual groups. These groups are nothing more than topic-oriented 
Facebook pages, a place for people interested in that topic to meet online. 



Group Activities 

What can you do in a Facebook group? Lots, actually. You can read the 
latest news, discover new information, view photos and movies, exchange 
messages with other group members, and engage in online discussions 
about the topic at hand. As you might suspect, each activity has its own tab 
on the group page. 

Most groups are public, meaning they're open for all Facebook members to 
join. Some groups, however, are private, and require that the group adminis- 
trator approve all requests for membership. You need to apply to join these 
private groups— and hope that your request is granted. 

After you join a group, you have full access to the group's Facebook page. 
Most pages are like the one in Figure 16.1 , with the standard sidebar along 
the left, familiar tabs in the middle, and annoying ads on the right. Which 
tabs you see depends on the group; some of these features are optional and 
aren't used by all groups. 



This is the official group for author 
Michael Miller 














Molehill Group 


[HI Join 




Wall Info Discussions Photos Video Events 






Create an Ad 






EB9 




d Like 




*£! 


Music 
Business 


Michael Miller: The MclehillGroup 

www. molehillgroup.com 

Michael Miller is a best-selling writer who has authored more than 100 non-fiction 
books over the past two decades. He is known for his casual, easv-to-read 
writing style and his ability to explain a wide variety of complex topics to an 
everyday audienc. 


| 




£H about an 


nute ago ■ Share ■ Flag 




flj Michael Miller There's always something interesting happening here! 
^^^^fl about a minute ago Flag 




Information 

Category; 

Business -Companies 

Description: 

My very own group 

Privacy Type: 

Open: All content is public, 




H Michael Miller Welcome to my new group! 

^^^^H 2 minutes ago ■ Flag 






t 

I±lfc 


X 




Admins 

■ Michael Miller (creator) 




Members 













Figure 16.1. A typical Facebook group page. 



Understanding Facebook Groups 223 

That said, the most common group tabs include the following: 

• Wall: This is the same Wall you find on regular Profile pages, full of status 
updates from the group's leaders and posts from members. 

• Info: This tab displays all the pertinent information about the group— cat- 
egory, description, contact info, and the like. 



re 



^Tip 



Use the Discussions tab, 
not the Wall, to conduct 
your group discussions. 



Discussions: This is the place where the 
real talk takes place. Group members start 
topic-based discussions; other users reply 
to create message threads. 

Photos: This is where group leaders and 
members post their photos about the topic 
at hand. 

Video: Just like the Photos tab, except for videos uploaded by group mem- 
bers. 

Events: Open this tab to view upcoming group events— online chats, physi- 
cal meet-ups, member reunions, and the like. 



Running the Group 

Remember, not all groups have all these tabs. What you see is up to the 
group leaders, called admins. That's short for administrator, of course, and 
the admin is the person who runs the group on a day-to-day basis. 

In most instances, the admin is the person who first created the group, 
although other users can also be granted admin status. The admin is respon- 
sible for posting new content to the group, monitoring the Wall and discus- 



sion tabs, inviting new members to the group, 
approving new member applications (if the 
group uses that option), and just generally 
making sure that things run smoothly. 

Bottom line, Facebook groups are great places 
to commiserate with other people who are at 
least a little like you, and to learn more about 
your favorite hobby or interest. A group is also 
a great place to ask any questions you might 



L^Note 

In addition to admins, 
a group can also have 
group officers. An officer 
is merely an honorary title; 
he or she has no privi- 
leges beyond that of nor 
mal members. 






224 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 

have about the topic at hand; you're likely to find more than a few experts 
(real or self-appointed) among the group members. 



Finding and Joining Groups 



Before you can partake in all that a group offers, you first have to find a 
group that meets your interest. After you find a group, you can then officially 
join it— and then participate to whatever degree suits your fancy. 

You find groups on Facebook by searching for them. Here's how it works: 

1. Enter one or more keywords that describe what you're looking for into the 
search box in the Facebook toolbar and then click the Search button. 

2. When the search results page appears, click the Groups link in the sidebar. 

3. This narrows your search results to just Facebook groups, as shown in 
Figure 16.2. Scroll to a group that looks good and click that group's name 
to view the Facebook page for that group. 



blue sky 

<\ All Results 
$l_ People 
^U Pages 



Did you mean: skyy blue, sky blue x, bluee sky 



c[^i Applications 
[a^ Events 

Web Results 
Fl Posts by Friends 
BO Posts by Everyone 



Show: All Group Types |_rj 








Name: 
Type: 
Members: 


BLUE 

Common Interest 
245 members 


Join Group 






Name: 
Type: 
Members: 


Blue 

Common Interest 
45 members 


Join Group 





Type; 
Members: 



BLUE 

Entertainment Si Arts 
44 members 



Request to Join 



BLUE 



Figure 16.2. Searching for groups on Facebook. 



Viewing Your Groups— and Your Friends' Groups 225 



To join the group, click the Join Group or 
Request to Join links on the search results 
page. 



(G 



^Tip 



You can also join a group 
directly from that group's 
Facebook page. Just click 
the Join or Request to Join 
button. 



As noted previously, most groups are open to 
all Facebook members to join, which you do 
by clicking the Join Group link or Join button. 
Some groups, however, require that the group 
administrator approve requests for member- 
ship; these groups display a Request to Join 

link or button instead of the normal Join or Join Group link. Facebook noti 
fies you when your membership request is approved. 



V. 



Viewing Your Groups— and Your Friends' 
Groups 

How do you get to the Facebook groups you belong to? It's simple, really. 
Just go to your Facebook Home page and click Groups in the sidebar. This 
displays your Groups page, shown in Figure 16.3, with all your groups listed. 
Click the name of a group to open that group's page. 



53 Groups 



+ Create a Group 



9 Random Group Name 
1 member 



Beatles Fans Around the World 

181,233 members 

1 Video, 1 Board Topic, 2 Links 



Growing up on the Indy westside! 

3,623 members 
1 Wall Post 



~w4 



fc 



Molehill Group 

1 member 
lLink 



Laura Hyro's Nomination For The Rock 'H Roll Hall Of Fame And Museum 

634 members 



Supporters of the Proposed Indianapolis Performing Arts Center 

5,054 members 



Figure 16.3. Viewing all your groups. 



226 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 

By the way, sometimes it's fun to see the groups that your friends belong 
to. You can often find new groups to join by examining your friends' groups. 
To see your friends' groups, go to your Groups page and click the Friends' 
Groups link in the sidebar. You now see those groups that your friends sub- 
scribe to; click a group name to visit that group's page, or just click the Join 
or Request to Join button to join up. 



Participating in a Group 



After you join a group, then what? It all depends on whether you want to be 
a passive or an active participant. 

Passive group participation means looking at what others post. This can 
range from viewing group photos and videos to reading ongoing discussions. 
All of this is easy enough to do; you don't need my help in that. 

Active participation is another thing. The primary way to "talk" with other 
members of a Facebook group is on the Discussions tab, shown in Figure 
16.4. A discussion is merely a series of messages and replies on a given 
topic; that forms a "thread" of messages that you can read through and reply 
to. 



Growing up on the Indy westsfde! 


M 




P^0| Wall Info Discussions 

Displaying topics 1 - 3 1 out of 62. See All Topics 


Photos 


Video Events 








, + Start Mew Topic 


Little Eagle Village Trailer Court 

1 5 posts . Created on May 7, 20 10 at 10 : 3 5am 






Latest post by Linda Love 
Posted 3 hours ago 


Garden City Elem. 

32 posts. Created on February 12, 2010 at 6:08pm 
Page 1 2 






Latest post by Diana Brooks 
Posted 10 hours ago 


Hangouts 

16 posts. Created on Februarys, 2010 at 6: 12am 






Latest post by Linda Love 

Posted on June 27, 20 10 at 1 : 5 2pm 


Westside in the 50's 

22 posts. Created on February 3, 20 10 at 7: 54pm 






Latest post by Linda Love 

Posted on June 27, 2010 at 1:48pm 


Ben Davis High School Class! 

43 posts. Created on February 3, 2010 at 3: 37pm 
Page 12 






Latest post by John Miller 

Posted on June 26, 2010 at 9:03am 


Ernie Pyle #90 

59 posts . Created on February 13, 20 10 at 7: Ham 
Page 12 






Latest post by Diana Brooks 

Posted on June 21, 20 10 at 12:01pm 



Figure 16.4. Viewing group discussions. 



Participating in a Group 227 

Most groups have dozens of different topics going at the same time. One 
post flows into another, members adding onto what other members have 
said, until you have a true discussion happening online. It's not in real time, 
of course, but it's still interesting. 

Viewing a discussion thread is as simple as opening the Discussions tab and 
clicking the title for a given discussion. This displays all messages on the 
topic, as shown in Figure 16.5, oldest first; new replies are added at the bot- 
tom of the thread. 



Ben Davis High School Class! 




'^^^^h Back to Growing up on the Indy westside! 


Discussion Board B 


Start New Topic 


Topic: Ben Davis High School Class! 


Reply to Topic 


Displaying posts 1-30 out of 43. 


1 2 Next 


1 Brenda Haney Krupinski I was the class of 1979 




H February S at 5:37pm ■ Report 




| Nancy James Riley I was in the class of '74 




& February S at 6 : 03pm ■ Report 




• Cindy O'Neill Huddleston I was in the class of 70 woohoo it's our 40th. Let 




ft us know if you want to party this summer? Make it casual, make it reasonably 




P priced and make it on the Westside. Send me your email address :] Hilda and I 




are trying to get this Party going!!!! 




February 3 at 6 : 17pm Report 




DodieBabbClassof"79" 




■ February 8 at 6 :40pm Report 




ft Randy Ludwkj We are great, great are we. We're the class of '73 




1 February S at 7:00pm ■ Report 





Figure 16.5. Messages in a discussion thread. 

To add your two cents worth, click the Reply to Topic link at the top of the 
list. This displays the Post Reply tab, shown in Figure 16.6. Enter your mes- 
sage into the Reply box and then click the Post Reply button. 

To start a new message thread, go to the Discussions tab and click the 
Start New Topic button. When the Start New Topic tab appears, as shown 
in Figure 16.7, enter a title for the thread into the Topic box, and your initial 
message into the Post box. Click the Post New Topic button to post your 
message and get the discussion going. 



228 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 




Figure 16.6. Replying to a discussion thread. 



Discussion 



■"- MIHM 



Topic 




Figure 16.7. Starting a new topic thread. 



Creating Your Own Group 



There are tens of thousands of groups already on Facebook, so chances are 
you can find one for whatever interests you. 
But if there isn't a group for your particular 
interest, you can create one— which is pretty 
easy to do. 

Here's the deal: Any Facebook member can 
create a new group. In fact, you can create 
more than one group, if you so wish. 



I " ' S 

L^Note 

A Facebook member can 
create up to 200 groups. 



Creating Your Own Group 229 

Group Administration 

As the creator of a group, you automatically become the group's admin. That 
means you're responsible for the day-to-day running of the group, such as it 
might be. Think about that responsibility before you launch a new group. 

Access Levels 

When you create a new group, you can choose from three different access lev- 
els that determine who can join the group, and how. These access levels are: 

• Open: This type of group has open membership; any Facebook member 
can see and join the group without prior approval. This is the most common 
type of group. 

• Closed: A closed group can be seen by all Facebook members, but the 
group administrator must approve all applications for membership. 

• Secret: A secret group cannot be found in any Facebook searches; new 
members join by invitation (of the admin) only. Create this type of group 
when you want a totally private experience. 

Group Features 

As noted previously, Facebook groups can contain many of the same fea- 
tures found on a traditional Facebook Profile page, such as a Wall, photos, 
videos, events, and the like. In addition, groups can include a discussion tab, 
where members can engage in thread-oriented discussions, such as those 
found on web message forums. 

Creating the Group 

Those preliminaries out of the way, just how do you create a new group? 
Buckle yourself in, folks, because it's a somewhat lengthy process that goes 
something like this: 

1. Navigate to the Facebook Home page and click the Groups link in the side- 
bar. 

2. When the Groups page appears, click the Create a Group button. 

3. When the Create a Group page appears, as shown in Figure 1 6.8, enter the 
name of your new group into the Group Name box. 



230 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 



[HJ Create a Group 



Group Name; 
[required] 

Description: 
[required) 



Group Type: 

[required) 

Recent Hews: 



Office: 

:na:l: 
Website 
Street 
City/Town: 



Select Category: 



|T1 Select Tvpe: 



B 



Nate: groups that attack a specific person or group of people 
[e.g. racist, sexist, or other hate groups) will not be 
tolerated. Creating such a group will result in the immediate 
termination of your Facebook account. 



Figure 16.8. Creating a new group. 

4. Enter a short description of the group into 
the Description box. 

5. Click For Group Type, click the Select 
Category arrow and select a category for 
your group: Business, Common Interest, 
Entertainment & Arts, Geography, Internet 
& Technology, Just for Fun, Music, 
Organizations, Sports & Recreation, or 
Student Groups. 

6. Click the Select Type arrow and select the 
type of group you're creating. The options 
here differ depending on the category you 
selected in the previous step. 

7. Enter any important announcements about 
this group into the Recent News box. 






ote 



If you're a member of 
a Facebook network, 
Facebook displays a 
Network list on the Create 
a Group page. To make 
your group available only 
to other members of a 
network, pull down the 
Network list and select a 
network. Select Global to 
make your group avail- 
able to all Facebook 
members. (Learn more 
about networks in Chapter 
17, "Networking for 
Business— and For Jobs." 



Creating Your Own Group 231 

8. If the group has an official office, enter the office's name into the Office 
box. 

9. If you want to display your email address, enter it into the Email box. 

10. If you have a website, enter the site's URL into the Website box. 

11. If you want to display your street address, enter it into the Street box. 

12. If you want to display your city, enter it into the City/Town box. 

13. Click the Create Group button. 

Customizing Your Group 

You're not done yet. After you've created the new group, you see the 
Customize page, shown in Figure 16.9, which includes numerous settings 
you can configure. 



HI] Edit Friends of Mike 

Step 1: Group Info 



Yourgroup has been created. 



M Non-admins can write on the wall 
n/l show group events. 

F71 show profile box 
El Show profile tab 

F71 Enable discussion board. 

F71 Enable photos 

'$ Alow al members to upload photos, 
i ■ Only allow admins to upload photos. 

n71 Show profile box 
EZ1 Show profile tab 



o Allow all members to upload videos. 
■ " I Only allow admins to upload videos. 

bZ] Show profile box 
[3 Show profile tab 



'&' Allow all members to post links. 
Only allow admins to post links. 



Figure 16.9. Customizing your new group. 



232 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 

By default, the following options are enabled: 
Non-admins can write on the Wall 
Show group events 
Enable discussion board 
Enable photos 

Allow all members to upload photos 
Enable videos 

Allow all members to upload videos 
Enable links 
Allow all members to post links 

To disable any of these features, uncheck their 
boxes. 

You also need to select the access level for 
your group, as discussed previously: Open, 
Closed, or Secret. Assuming you want to cre- 
ate a public group, select This Group Is Open 
in the Access section. 

When you're done configuring these options, 
click the Save button. 



L^Note 

You can also opt to dis- 
play (or not) a profile box 
and profile tab for many of 
these items. 






Letting Others Know About Your Group 

There's still more. If your group is a public one, Facebook now prompts you 
to publish a status update about this group to your Profile page and to your 
friends' Home pages, as shown in Figure 16.10. Click the Publish button to 
post this update, or click Skip to not do so. 

Now it's time to formally invite your friends to join your new group. You know 
this because Facebook displays the Invite People to Group page, shown 
in Figure 16.11. To invite Facebook friends to join your group, click each 
friend's name in the list. To invite non-Facebook members to join your group, 
enter their email addresses into the Invite People via Email box; use commas 
to separate multiple addresses. 



Creating Your Own Group 233 



Publish to your Walt and your friends' home pages? 



"S 



Michael Miller 
Friends of Nike 

. Common Interest - Activities 

| A group for friends of author Michael NSllcr 

ju] Not Published Yet 



Figure 16.10. Publishing a notice about your group as a status update. 



[HI Invite People to Friends of Mike 



Customize Officers Members 



Back to Friends of Mike 



Invite Friends 

Select friends to invite by clicking on their picture below 



Promote Group with an Ad 



Find Friends: Start Typing a Name 



Cindy Mooers 



^J Selected [0) 

Steve Searcy 



r Kathleen 
Kinley 



ShellyeA. 
Kaplin 



Jane 
Flanders 



n 



Anik Rahman 
Ned 



Debbie 
French-A... 



Invite People Via Email ^ Import Email Addresses 
Enter emails separated by commas 



Figure 16.11. Inviting people to join your group. 

Enter a message to accompany this invitation 
into the Add a Personal Message box and then 
click the Send Invitations button. Everyone 
you selected receives an invitation to join your 
group. 



rtS 



M'Tip 



a 



^ 



You can also invite new 
members from the group's 
Facebook page. 



234 CHAPTER 16 Meeting Others in Groups 



Reconnecting 

On the surface, it's easy to think of Facebook groups as like 21st-cen- 
tury versions of the homeroom clubs you had back in high school. You 
know, chess club, knitting club, model airplane club, and the like. 

But while there certainly are a huge number of these club-like Facebook 
groups, there are also groups that are more about times and places than 
they are about hobbies and interests. As such, these groups attempt to 
reconnect people with shared experiences. 

I belong to a number of groups that connect me back to the days of 
my youth. For example, I grew up on the west side of Indianapolis, and 
there's a Facebook group called Growing Up on Indy's Westside. It's a 
fun little group, with people posting faded pictures of old haunts, and 
lots of discussions about the way things used to be and what we used 
to do back then. I can't say I contribute too often, but it's always fun to 
read what others post. 

I also belong to a "Where is and/or who do you remember?" group for 
my high school. This is a great place to find out what my old classmates 
have been up to in the decades since graduation. Lots of posts asking 
about individual students, teachers, and events. It's a nice stroll through 
memory lane. 

The point is, Facebook groups— and their discussion boards— are great ways 
to reconnect with your past. You might even meet up with some of your old 
friends in these groups, or make some new friends you should have made 
way back then. It's kind of a virtual blast from the past, and we have the 
Facebook social network to thank for it. 



Chaffy 1 f 



Networking for 
Business— and for Jobs 



As you know, Facebook is a great place to connect with fam- 
ily members and old friends. It's also a good place to con- 
nect with current and former co-workers, as well as others 
in your industry or profession. For that matter, many people 
use Facebook to help them look for new jobs; with all those 
"friends" you have on the Facebook site, at least one of them 
must know somebody somewhere who can help you get an 
in for a new position. 

How, then, do you use Facebook on a more business- 
oriented basis? It's a matter of taking advantage of the 
appropriate Facebook features, and of acting a bit more pro- 
fessional online. 

Understanding Facebook Networks 

You're familiar with Facebook groups and fan pages, which 
help you connect with others who share your personal inter- 
ests. Well, Facebook has a similar feature that lets you con- 
nect with others on a more professional basis— in particular, 
people who work at the same company you do. 

What Facebook offers is a special type of group, called a 
network, devoted to a specific company— large companies, 
in particular. To join a company's network, you have to be 
an employee of that company, and you have to provide an 
active email address from that company. That's how you 
join the network, by the way— by entering your work email 
address. 



236 CHAPTER 17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 



Note that networks exist only for established 
businesses; there's either a network for your 
business, or there isn't. And if there isn't, 
you're out of luck, as Facebook won't let indi- 
viduals create new networks. 

That said, it's worth your while to see if 
Facebook has a network for the company you 
work for— especially if it's a big company, with 
lots of offices in disparate locations. Let's face 
it, if you work in a five-person business, you 
don't really need a special Facebook group to 
connect with your co-workers. But if you work 
for an organization with thousands of employ- 
ees across the nation or globe, connecting with 
your co-workers via Facebook could prove 
particularly useful. 

What can you do in a work network? It's 
pretty much like any other Facebook group, 
with membership limited to your work col- 
leagues. You can read status updates posted by company representatives, 
peruse company information, view photos of remote offices and work-related 
events, and join in lively discussions with colleagues near and far. It's a 
meeting place for the people you work with, plain and simple. 



L^Note 

Networks also exist for 
many schools and univer- 
sities. Access to a school 
network is limited to cur- 
rent students, former stu- 
dents, and teachers who 
have valid school email 
addresses. Because you 
probably graduated long 
ago and no longer have a 
school email address (if, in 
fact, you ever did), joining 
your old school network 
is probably out of the 
question. So we limit our 
discussion of networks to 
business networks only. 



Joining Your Work Network 



To join a company for your current employer, you must have a valid email 
address; this keeps non-employees and former employees from joining in the 
festivities. Assuming you have a work email address, follow these steps to 
join your company's network: 

1. From the Facebook toolbar, click Account and then select Account 
Settings. 



2. From the My Account page, click the Networks tab, shown in Figure 1 7.1 . 



Networking Professionally 237 



My Account 



ratifications Mobile Language Payments Facebook Ads 



Facebookis made up of many networks, each based around a workplace, region, high school, or college. Join a network to discover the people 
who work, live or study around you. 



You aren't in any networks. 



Join a Network 



Enter a workplace or schooL 
Network name: 



Figure 17.1. Joining a work network. 

3. Enter the name of your company into the Network Name box. As you type, 
matching networks appear in a drop-down menu. 

4. Select your company from the list. 

5. Enter your work email address into the Work Email box. 

6. Click the Join Network button. 

You should now receive a confirmation email at your work email address. 
Click the link in this email to finalize things. You now have access to your 
company's Facebook page, and everything that goes with it. 



Networking Professionally 



Although Facebook has its roots in personal social networking, it has also 
become a useful site for establishing professional connections. That's right, 
Facebook is more than just a site for friends and families; it's also a place 
to connect with co-workers, other professionals in your industry, and other 
business people in your city. 



Finding Other Business Professionals on Facebook 

There are many ways to find other business professionals (and potential 
employers) on the Facebook site. Let's look at a few. 

One approach is to browse for friends of your business friends. Begin by 
identifying a colleague or business professional who is already in your friends 



238 CHAPTER 17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 

list, then go to that person's Profile page and browse his or her friends list. If 
you find someone with whom you would like to connect, invite that person to 
become your friend. Peruse that person's friends list to identify further poten- 
tial business connections— and so on and so on. It's like a six degrees of 
separation thing; eventually, you connect to people who can be of value. 

Of course, if you're looking for connections within your company, the best 
bet is to join your company's network, as just discussed. Search for your 
company and, if a network exists, join that network. You will have access to 
all company employees who are Facebook members and who have joined 
that network. 

You can also use Facebook's search function to search for relevant company 
names, industry buzzwords, and the like. Filter the search results by people, 
and you see a list of people who work for the company or in the industry in 
question. Invite these people to be your Facebook friends. 



Managing Your Professional Contacts 

After you've added a number of professional 
contacts to your Facebook friends list, it's 
good practice to create a list of just these 
professional friends. You can then easily send 
email messages to this list of professional con- 
tacts. Create a single message and then enter 
the list name into the message's To box. The 
message is sent to all members of this list. 

You can also filter the status updates and other 
information you send to the members of this 
professional contacts list; Facebook lets you 
configure its privacy settings so that members 
of a list can see only select information. Doing 
so enables you to display personal information 
to your personal friends and hide that personal 
information from your professional friends. 






ote 



Learn more about creat- 
ing custom friends lists in 
Chapter 7, "Organizing Your 
Friends List." Learn more 
about sending messages 
in Chapter 9, "Exchanging 
Private Messages." 






ote 



Learn more about deter- 
mining who can view 
your status updates and 
personal information in 
Chapter 21 , "Keeping 
Some Things Private." 






Job Hunting on Facebook 239 



Networking via Facebook Groups 

Facebook hosts a large number of groups 
focused on professional topics. These are 
groups devoted to a particular company, 
industry, or profession, and tend to be where 
you find like-minded professionals on the 
Facebook site. 



I " "1 



ote 



Learn more about 
Facebook groups in 
Chapter 16, "Meeting 
Others in Groups." 






Use Facebook's search function to search for 

keywords related to your company, profession, or industry. When the search 
results page appears, filter the results by group. You can then join those 
groups that are most closely related to what you're looking for professionally. 



After you join a professional group, become an 
active participant. Participate in group discus- 
sions, respond to questions asked by other 
group members, and start your own conversa- 
tions with others in the group. And when you 
post, be sure to provide useful and relevant 
information and advice to the group. Over 
time you become familiar with other group 
members, and you can invite them to join your 
friends list. 



***** 



I 



Caution 



A 



Avoid making group 
posts that sound like 
advertisements or overt 
solicitations, especially 
solicitations for employ- 
ment. You should offer 
genuine contributions, not 
self-promotion disguised 
as posts. 



You should also consider creating your own 
professional group, related to your profession 
or industry, and see which professionals it 

attracts. When you create such a group, make sure that it offers unique value 
not found in other similar groups. Invite your professional Facebook friends 
to this group; you should also invite non-Facebook members to join, via the 
email join feature. Encourage all group members to invite their professional 
friends to join the group, as well. The more successful your group, the more 
professional connections you will make. 



Job Hunting on Facebook 



In addition to simple professional networking, you can also use Facebook 
to connect with prospective employers and seek out new jobs. To that end, 



240 CHAPTER 17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 

Facebook is second only to Linkedln for job hunters— and for employers 
seeking to fill new positions. 

The key here is finding employers who use social networking sites such as 
Facebook to find prospective job applicants. Many companies look online 
to fill positions before paying for a job listing in a newspaper or on a job site 
such as Monster.com. Better to fill the position for free than pay for the list- 
ing, the thinking goes. 

For that matter, you can often connect with potential employers before posi- 
tions exist. You connect with someone on Facebook, make friends with 
them as it were, and they'll think of you when something crops up in the 
future. 



Reworking Your Profile 

When you're in the job market, you need to present a professional face to 
potential employers. The first place to start is your Facebook Profile page, 
which can be reworked to function much like an online resume. 



rfi 



^Tip 



First, eliminate all unnecessary and potentially damaging personal informa- 
tion from your profile. That means deleting information about your political 
and religious views, your favorite TV shows, 
likes and dislikes, and the like. Employers 
don't want or need to know that you're a fan 
of / Dream ofJeanie, follow Phish from concert 
to concert, and support the Libertarian party. 
That information seldom works in your favor, 
and often works against you. Better to keep it 
short and sweet with the personal details. 

Next, load up your profile with all sorts of pro- 
fessional information, including employment 
history, professional accomplishments, and the 
like. There are sections in your profile for much 
of this information; what doesn't fit naturally 
can be added to the Bio section in your profile. 

After you have your profile cleaned up, make 

sure that it's set for public viewing. No sense going to all that work and then 

hiding it from a future employer. 



1 L 

V 



You should also sort 
through your Facebook 
photos and delete those 
that present you in a non- 
professional matter. That 
includes some "recre- 
ational" photos; include too 
many golf photos and an 
employer might think you 
spend too much time on 
the links and not enough at 
the office. 



Job Hunting on Facebook 241 

Becoming a Fan of Potential Employers 

Facebook fan pages are a great way to learn more about companies you 
want to work for. Not only can you find basic information about a company, 
you get first notice of company news and events. 

To that end, you want to sign up as a fan for any 



i u li idi ci iu, yuu wcii ii lu siyi i up ds d idi i iui di ly j^ 

potential company that has a Facebook page. _$/ N 1 6 

That means "liking" the company, of course; 
after you do so, status updates from the com- 
pany automatically appear in your News Feed. 



Learn more about fan 
pages in Chapter 15, 
"Becoming a Fan." 



Asking for a Job 

Finally, let's not dismiss the simple act of using Facebook to tell people that 
you're looking for a job. You can do this by posting a status update to that 
effect— "Hey, I'm job hunting, anybody know of open positions?" 

Of course, this probably isn't an option if you currently have a job and want 
to jump somewhere else. You don't want to tip off your current employer that 
you're looking, after all. 

That said, this is a very direct way for the unemployed to make their interests 
known. Telling your Facebook friends that you're available sometimes turns 
up interesting work. Who knows which of your friends has knowledge of a 
decent job opportunity— or is looking to hire someone himself? 

Keeping Your Personal and Professional Lives Separate 

When you're using Facebook for professional purposes, you have to be 
careful about mixing your personal and professional lives. For example, 
you probably don't want to broadcast gossip (or even pictures!) about 
your drunken behavior at a weekend party to your boss, or to potential 
employers. It makes sense to practice discretion about what you post 
in your status updates, and to utilize Facebook's numerous privacy set- 
tings to limit what you display to whom online. 

This goes beyond the obvious to the quite subtle. If you do a lot of 
spouting off about politics or religion or other sensitive subjects in your 
Facebook status updates, some potential employers might think twice 
before giving you a hearing. For that matter, complaining about your 



242 CHAPTER 17 Networking for Business— and for Jobs 



current employer is sure to both get back to your boss (and nothing good 
will come of that) and cause potential employers to think you're either a 
whiner or a troublemaker, or possibly both. And nobody wants to deliber- 
ately hire someone like that. 

To some degree, it comes down to the image conveyed by your Facebook 
presence. If you're less than discreet online, potential employers have to 
ask the question, what kind of judgment does this person possess? Poor 
judgment about what you say or post could carry over into what you do at 
work. In an employer's eyes, that would not be a good thing. 

Speaking of images, know that your so-called friends on Facebook can 
work against you. Off-color remarks posted by a friend on your Wall are 
seen by others. If you're tagged in a questionable photo posted by a 
friend, that photo is going to show up in your stuff. And that includes pho- 
tos from long ago and far away; a lot of people keep busy scanning old 
pictures and posting them on Facebook, tagging everyone included. You 
might not want these pictures made publicly available, but unless you can 
convince your friends to take them down, there you are. 

And don't think that employers don't check you out on Facebook and 
other social networking sites. They most certainly do. You can't hide in 
plain sight, when you're an active job prospect they're going to search for 
you and see what they find. If there's something up there that presents 
you in poor light, they'll find it. 

Although you can try to hide some personal information by reconfiguring 
Facebook's privacy settings, there are ways around this. A large com- 
pany might have someone on staff who went to the same school you did, 
and thus be able to view your information via the school network ties. 
Sometimes they deal in subterfuge, getting an intern to pose as a friend of 
a friend or whatever to get onto your friends list. In other words, if a com- 
pany wants to see your stuff, they'll find a way. 

So don't assume that your "private" information on Facebook will remain 
private. Instead, assume that a potential employer will look for and find 
everything posted by you and about you on Facebook. Take the effort to 
clean things up as much as you can — and refrain from mixing your per- 
sonal and professional lives online. 



Chaffer 1 q 



Finding Fun Games and 
Applications 

Mafia Wars. FarmVille. LivingSocial. FamilyLink. 

You've seen them. Possibly you've played them or used 
them. Maybe you've even been annoyed by them— or rather, 
by posts about them from your friends. But what are they? 

Mafia Wars, FarmVille, LivingSocial, et al are Facebook appli- 
cations. That is, they're games and little utility programs that 
run on the Facebook site. And they're very, very popular. 

Understanding Facebook 
Applications 

A Facebook application is simply a program or game that 
runs on the Facebook site. These applications are accessed 
from their own Facebook pages, and you use them while 
you're signed into Facebook. 



L^Note 



Now, these aren't big fancy 

applications like Microsoft 

Office or Quicken. No, thev're ■■ u 

^...^ u. «u.^r^... .nu, u.^y .^ Some applications, such 

small, typically single-purpose as the defau , t Photos and 
applications, web-based in Videos applications, are 
nature, that add a bit of func- developed by Facebook. 
tionality to your Facebook Most applications, how- 
experience. ever . are created by 

third-party application 

Some applications build on developers. Most applica- 

the social networking nature of tions are available free of 

the Facebook site. Others are charge, 
designed for more solitary use. 



244 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 

Some are strictly functional. Others are more fun. The reality is that there are a 
wide range of these available; you're bound to find some that look interesting to 
you. 

For example, the aforementioned FamilyLink is designed to help you connect 
with other family members on Facebook. LivingSocial offers a variety of appli- 
cations that track and publicize the books you're reading, music you're listening 
to, and so forth. And the Causes application, shown in Figure 18.1, helps you 
mobilize your Facebook friends to support various charities and organizations. 



Impact 

1 action taken 



iQ Recruiting i 1 nie 

1 : = . : t su pported by you 



Michael's Causes 

Active member in 1 of 1 causes. 

|Pp Juvenile Diabetes Research 
. ., Foundation 



Michael Miller's Causes Profile 



Michael's Recently Completed Actions 



^ RECRU:~NG Michael joined the cause Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. 
Show More w 



Michael's Care Notes 



Write a Care Note 



Michael & His Friends 

Total Actions 



June 

Actions Taken 



Michael Miller left you a note. 

Donate today — it's a great cause! 

I rvl" Cause: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 

£3 Posted at 5:27pm - 



ii 



Kathleen Kinley 7 

Cheryl Jadison 4 

Lenser 

Michael Andrews 1 

1 



Nancy Schulmeyer 
Q ishman 



Figure 18.1. Facebook's Causes application. 



Then there are the apps that are a little less serious. Honesty Box is a quiz 
you can send to friends to find out what they really think about you. Which 
Star Trek Captain Are You?, shown in Figure 18.2, is another quiz that deter- 
mines whether you're more like Kirk or Picard. The iHeart and @Hugs applica- 
tions let you send your love to your Facebook friends. And Bumper Sticker 
lets you create and post fun sayings to your Facebook page. 

Some Facebook applications are actually games— social games, to be exact. 
These are single-player or multi-player games that you play on the Facebook 
site, while you're logged on. Mafia Wars, FarmVille (shown in Figure 18.3), and 
PetVille are probably the most popular of these games, but there are a lot more 
than just these, some of which have millions of users. These games can be fairly 
addictive and become big time-wasters— which isn't necessarily a bad thing. 



Understanding Facebook Applications 245 



* am Bookmark Take the Quiz: 




Which Star Trek Captain are 
you? 

The Comprehens^e Que Find out who'5 shoes you'd fit 
the best 



What's your ideal starship type? 

E3 



M..UIJ.I.U..1JIJ.ILI.IILJI.I. 

® Something fight but powerful 

O A large cruiser. 

O Small, but can pack a punch 

O Something that knows no bounds 

O A fair explorer but nimble fighter 

O A scout ship, or a science vessel 

© Anything with fins... 



Figure 18.2. The Which Star Trek Captain Are You? application. 




Figure 18.3. The ever-popular FarmVille application. 



246 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 

To give you a flavor of what's available, all you have to do is look at the cat- 
egories that Facebook uses to organize these applications. As such, look for 
apps in the Business, Education, Entertainment, Friends & Family, Games, 
Just for Fun, Lifestyle, Sports, and Utilities categories. 

Discovering Applications and Games 

How do you find a Facebook application or game? You can either browse or 
search for apps; it's up to you. 



Browsing for Apps 

If you're not sure what specific app or game you're looking for, it might be 
useful to browse applications by category. This lets you see all related appli- 
cations, and choose from there. 

Just follow these steps: 

1. Navigate your Web browser to the Facebook application directory, located 
at www.facebook.com/apps/. (Figure 18.4 shows this directory.) 



All Applications 



Search Apps 



| 



Business 

Education 

Entertainment 

Friends & Family 

Games 

Just For Fun 

Lifestyle 



Featured By Facebook 



Where I've Been 



Share the places you've been with an 
interactive map, gain and share advice 
and tips on cities,, and make 
reservations easily. 



Applications You May Like 




Get personalized concert alerts, create 
and share playlists with your friends, 
and discover new music with free MP 3s. 



J3 like. 



Page 1 of 20 



Sports 


Movies 


Utilities 


-JniL 


On Facebook 




External Websites 


'fr^k'fci 


I''=s-.:co 




Mobile 


Birthday Calenda 


Pages 


C2> 


Prototypes 




1r1r1ri 




Developer 



Entertainment 



Slide FunSpace 



slide 



Entertainment 




MyTalendar 



30 



jdfttf 



Birthday Cards 



roCNyou! 



Entertainment 



Games 
RockYou Live 

S 

nxkgou 

Entertainment 



Figure 18.4. Browsing for apps in the Facebook application directory. 



Using an Application or Game 247 

2. From the sidebar, click the category of application you're looking for. 

3. Click the link for an application to display the Facebook page for that app. 

Searching for Apps 

Browsing is fine, but if you have a specific app or game in mind, it's quicker 
to search for it. Follow these steps: 

1. Enter the name of the app into the search box in the Facebook toolbar and 
then click the Search button. 

2. When the search results page appears, click Applications in the sidebar to 
display only applications in the search results, as shown in Figure 18.5. 







ations in the Application Directory 




calendar 






<\ All Results 
jl^ People 

, PSQE-" 

\u\ Groups 

[*H Events 
[3 Web Results 
00 Posts by Friends 
GO Posts by Everyone 


[£J] Find more Appli 




rackyou! 


Name : 
Active Users 


Birthday Cards 

20,656,641 monthly active users 


View Application 


CC2> 


Name: 
Active Users 


Birthday Calendar 

5,949,564 monthly active users 


View Application 


dlftMMh 

fill 


Name : 
Active Users 


Calendar 

40,075 monthly active users 


View Application 


3 


Name: 
Active Users 


fdCal 

8,083 monthly active users 


View Application 






Name: 
Active Users 


Calendar 

15,344 monthly active users 




30 




View Application 



Figure 18.5. Searching for applications. 



3. Click the link for an application to display the Facebook page for that app. 



Using an Application or Game 



When you find an application you like, click the link for that application to go 
to that application's Facebook page. This page, like the one in Figure 18.6, 



248 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 

contains important information about that application — including, in many 
instances, reviews from users of that app. 




Add to my Page 
Add to My Page's Favorites 
Suggest to Friends 
Block Application 



Connecting family members on 
Facebook and helping you find new 
relatives. 



irki (2.4 out of 5) 

Based on 6_ r 49Q reviews 

Users: 

6 r QQ6 r 929 monthly active users,. 

9 friends 



Family Tree I E? "■«= I 
Wall Info Reviews 
Family Tree + Others 



Discussions 
Just Others 



Family Tree What's your earliest family memory? 

Let us know on Family Tree: http://apps.facebook.com/familytree 

June 24 at 12:10pm 

li 165 people like this. 

Q View all 276 comments 



Family Tree Familybuilder is an AlwaysOn Top 100 company. 
Thanks to all of our Family Tree users! 
w^\ The AhvaysOn East Top 100 Companies | AlwaysOn 

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Family Tree What's your favorite thing to do with family members? 
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Figure 18.6. The Facebook page for a typical application. 

If you want to use that application or play that game, follow these steps: 

1. From the application's Facebook page, click the Go to Application button. 

2. When the Request for Permission page appears, like the one shown in 
Figure 18.7, you see what actions the application wants to take. This might 
include accessing your personal information, sending you email, posting to 
your Wall, and accessing your friends' info. If you're okay with all this, click 
the Allow button. If you're not, click the Leave Application button. 



What happens next depends on the application. You might be returned to 
the app's Facebook page, or you might see a new page with information 
on how to start using the app. For games, you'll probably be taken to the 
game's page, where you can start playing the game. 



Viewing and Managing Your Applications— and Those Your Friends Are Using 249 





Request for Permission 


Mafia Wars Game is requesting permission to do the following: 




H Access my basic information 

|^B9 Includes name, profile picture, gender, networks, user ID, list 
of friends, and any other information I've shared with 
everyone. 


- ■ 


RT^t Send me email 

Ha Mafia Wars Game may email me directiy at 
mmiller@fnolehillgroup.com "Change 


Mafia Wars Game 
• •• + 


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Application 


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1 Leave Application 



Figure 18.7. Giving permission for an application to do all sorts of stuff. 

Viewing and Managing Your Applications— 
and Those Your Friends Are Using 

Want to see which applications you're using? There are probably a lot more 
than you might remember. 



Viewing Your Applications and Games 

If all you want to do is see which apps you're using, go to your Facebook 
Home page and click Applications in the sidebar. This displays the Appli- 
cations page, as shown in Figure 18.8, with your apps listed at the top. Click 
any link to view the page for that application. 



As to games, even though they're technically 
Facebook applications, you view them sepa- 
rately. Go to the Facebook Home page and 
click Games in the sidebar. This displays the 
Games page, with your games listed at the top. 

By the way, you can view those apps and 
games your friends are using from the 
Applications and Games pages. Your friends' 
apps and games are listed below yours on 
these pages. 



L^Note 

Facebook isn't always con- 
sistent as to what it labels 
an application or game. For 
example, weRead, which I 
would clearly call an appli- 
cation, is listed as a game. 
For this reason, you might 
need to look in both places 
to view everything you're 
using. 



250 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 



U| Applications 

Your Applications 



n credits- Get Info 






Which Star Trek Captain are you? [l friend) 
■ Currently using 



Causes [16 friends) 
■ Currently using 



reads Good reads Books [2 friends) 
Used today 



Lr/ingSocial: Albums [l friend) 
■ Used on Sunday 



A 



See all your applications ► 



Figure 18.8. Viewing the applications you're using. 



Managing Your Apps and Games 



Viewing which apps you're using is nice, but what if you want to manage 
them — specifically, to delete those you're no longer using? Well, Facebook 
lets you do this too. Just follow these steps: 

1. From the Facebook toolbar, click Account and then select Application 
Settings. 

2. When the Application Settings page appears, as shown in Figure 18.9, you 
see those applications and games you've used in the past month. To delete 
an application or game, click the X on the far right of its listing. 

3. To determine how an application is used and where it's displayed, click the 
Edit Settings link for that listing. This displays the Edit Application Settings 
dialog box, like the one in Figure 18.10. Each application has its own 
unique settings; make your changes and then click the Okay button. 

What about these application settings? Well, the most common ones con- 
cern where an application is displayed and who can see it. 



Viewing and Managing Your Applications— and Those Your Friends Are Using 251 



Application Settings - Recently Used 



Displaying 22 applications you have used in the past month. 



'■&. Causes 



. _ LivingSocial 



Figure 18.9. Managing your applications. 



Show: i Recently Used 



Edit Settings Profile X 



f^l Events 


Edit Settings 


Profile 




B Facebook for iPhone 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


ffi Family Tree 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


FT] FaMiilyLink.com 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


4f> FamiVille 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


B Gifts 


Edit Settings 


Profile 




9 Goodreads Books 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


El Groups 


Edit Settings 


Profile 




H Hallmark Social Calendar 


Edit Settings 


Profile 


X 


fl] Links 


Edit Settings 


Profile 





Edit Settings Profile 



Edit Causes Settings 



Profile Bookmark Additional Permissions 



Box: Available (add) 

Tab: Available [add) 

PnVac * ; | B Everyone 7] 

This setting controls the visibility of Causes's Box or 
Tab on your Profile. 



Figure 18. 10. Editing application settings. 



From the Edit Application Settings dialog box, click the Profile tab. There are 
likely several options here, possibly including the following: 

• Box: If this option is enabled, a box for this application appears either on a 
Boxes tab on your Profile page or possibly in a box in the sidebar of your 
Profile page. 

• Tab: If this option is enabled, a tab for this application appears on your 
Profile page. 



252 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 



i" "1 



• Privacy: Click this button to determine 

who can see information about this appli- /^^|\| PltP 

cation on your Profile page: Everyone, 
Friends Only, or Friends of Friends. Select Some apps have an Addi- 

Customize to select visibility options for tional Permissions tab that 

specific friends. Iets v°ii give permission 

for the app to publish con- 
Not all apps or games have all these options. tent to your Wall, access 
(It can never be that simple, of course.) You your email address, and 
need to configure each application as neces- 
sary, using the options available. 



the like. 



Apps for Grown-Ups 



Young people and older people use pretty much the same Facebook fea- 
tures, but they often use them in different ways. This is certainly the case 
with Facebook applications, where the apps used by the younger crowd tend 
to be much different than those used by those of us with a few more years 
under our belts. 

Younger users, for example, tend to use a lot of the "quiz"-type applica- 
tions, such as Honesty Box, IQ Test, Who Were You in a Past Life?, and Do 
You Really Know Me? They're also big on apps that purport to discover your 
true personality (My Personality, Personality Analysis), deliver horoscopes 
and predictions (Daily Horoscope, Numerology), link together their Facebook 
friends (Top Friends, My BFFs), express moods and opinions (Bumper 
Sticker, Pieces of Flair), and send little virtual tchotchkes to each other (Pass 
a Drink, Send a Rose). In other words, a lot of virtual time wasters. 

Older users, however, tend to be a little less frivolous and bit more practical 
in their choice of apps. People our age like to use apps that help them con- 
nect to family members online, manage their schedules, track their favorite 
books and music, connect with business associates, and do good things. It's 
a different bag of apps than what your kids or grandkids use. 

With that in mind, here are some of the apps I find most useful for or inter- 
esting to those of us of a certain age: 



Apps for Grown-Ups 253 

Birthday Calendar: This app goes a few steps beyond Facebook's built-in 
birthday notifications, compiling all the birthdays of your friends and fam- 
ily members into a single calendar interface. It helps you plan ahead for 
upcoming birthdays, which is a good thing if you have a large family to deal 
with. 

Business Cards: This app lets you create a custom business card and 
attach it to your Facebook messages. 

Causes: This is a very popular application, designed to help publicize wor- 
thy causes and raise money for them. 

Circle of Moms: This is a social network within the Facebook network that 
lets moms connect with other moms to address the challenges of mother- 
hood. This one has more than a million users. 

Family Tree: A great tool for finding your relatives— and staying in touch 
with them. 

FamilyLink: Another app for connecting with your relatives online. 

GoodReads: This app helps you manage your book library, review books, 
and share your favorite books with your Facebook friends. 

iLike: Okay, this one's popular with the kiddos, too, but it's also a great 
app for us music-loving oldsters. iLike lets you share your favorite songs 
and playlists, as well as discover new music. 

Jobster Career Network: A great app for those of us in the job market. 
Jobster lets you post your resume, receive job alerts, and search for open- 
ings from within Facebook. 

Linkedln Profile: Great for job hunters, or just those who want to connect 
with professional colleagues. This app adds your Linkedln profile informa- 
tion to your Facebook Profile page. 

MeetingWave: This tool helps you meet up with people offline. Good for 
making local business contacts, discovering sales prospects, and even 
hooking up with potential employers. 

My Diet: A nice app for helping you take off a few pounds. Includes food 
and activity diaries, weight ticker, weight chart, journal, support wall, and 
the ability to compare your activities to those of your friends. 

MyCalendar: An application that helps you keep track of friends' birthdays 
and Facebook events. 



254 CHAPTER 18 Finding Fun Games and Applications 

• TripAdvisor— Cities I've Visited: A neat little app that creates an interac- 
tive travel map of places you've traveled, which you can then share with 
your Facebook friends. 

• Twitter: If you're into the Twitter thing, this app enables you to follow your 
Facebook friends who also tweet and post your own tweets to Facebook. 

• Visual Bookshelf: Another good app for 
book lovers, a good way to share your liter- 
ary likes with your Facebook friends. & N 1 P 

• Weekly Schedule: This app posts a graphi- .. 

i- 1- i- a r- you can learn more about 

cal display of your weekly activities for all and start using any of 

your Facebook friends to see. these apps just by search . 

• Where I've Been: Another travel app that in 9 for them from the 
tracks all the places you've visited, to share Facebook toolbar, 
with your Facebook friends. 

Then there's the games. While I'd like to say that older, more mature users 
are less likely to play Facebook's social games, I don't think that's the case. I 
see too many posts about FarmVille, Mafia Wars, Bejeweled Blitz, and Texas 
Hold'em Poker to think otherwise. No, I'm pretty sure that a lot of old gee- 
zers waste as much time playing these games as do their more spritely off- 
spring. It also appears that older users play many of the same games as do 
their younger counterparts. 

That said, I'm not going to go through a list of popular games here. You 
know what you like to play; you don't need me to tell you that. So feel free to 
search for what you like or just browse through Facebook's games category 
in the application directory. There are plenty of games to waste your time 
with there. 

Blocking Annoying Games and Apps 

Some people really like Facebook apps, especially playing games like 
Mafia Wars and FarmVille. I don't. I'm not a big game player, period, and 
I especially don't care to hear about the games that my friends are play- 
ing. That's their business, and I don't want to be bothered. 

The thing is, I get bothered, because many games and apps insist on 
posting status updates to my friends' feeds. Some apps post updates 



Apps for Grown-Ups 255 



when a friend reads a new book or listens to a new CD. Some games 
post updates when a friend reaches a certain level or posts a certain 
score. (Or, in the case of Mafia Wars, when they "off" someone impor- 
tant.) These unwanted updates clog my News Feed and annoy the hell 
out of me. 

Fortunately, there's a way to block these app-generated updates from 
your News Feed. Block an app or game once, and you'll never see an 
update about that app again. 

I talked about this trick back in Chapter 5, but it bears repeating here. 
To block an app or game from posting status updates to your News 
Feed, you first have to find one of these annoying posts. Point to the 
post to display the Hide button; this displays a box underneath the post 
with three more buttons: Hide Friend, Hide Application, and Cancel. (For 
example, if it's a Farmville post, the button reads Hide FarmVille.) Click 
the Hide Application button and it blocks all future posts from this appli- 
cation or game from any of your friends. 

Needless to say, I use this technique a lot. And I don't get too bothered by 
unwanted application and game posts. Hurray! 



This page intentionally left blank 



Gh/fo "|9 



Using Facebook on the 
Go 



Most people connect with Facebook from their personal 
computers. But that isn't the only way to connect; you can 
also use your mobile phone to post status updates and read 
posts in your News Feed. Connecting in this fashion helps 
you keep in touch while you're on the go— or just waiting in 
line at the supermarket. 

You can connect to Facebook from any mobile phone, using 
simple text messages. But if you have a smartphone, like the 
Apple iPhone, you can use phone-specific Facebook appli- 
cations to gain access to most of Facebook's features on the 
go. Even if all you have is basic Web access (no Facebook 
app), you can still connect to the Facebook site via your 
phone's Web browser. 



Connecting from Your iPhone 

i " * ^ 

L^Note 



Because Apple's iPhone is the 
most popular smartphone on 
the market today, let's start by 
examining how you can con- 
nect to Facebook from your 
iPhone. 

It all starts with the Facebook 
for iPhone application. You can 
find this app in the iPhone App 
Store, just search the store for 
"Facebook" and then download 
the app— it's free. 



You can learn more about 
Facebook for iPhone 
by going to the app's 
Facebook page, at www. 
facebook.com/iphone/. 
The first time you launch 
the app, you need to enter 
your email address and 
password to log onto the 
Facebook site. 






258 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 



(G 



^TTip 



Figure 19.1 shows the Home screen of the 
Facebook for iPhone application. As you can 
see, you have icons for nine specific functions: 

• News Feed: This displays the most recent 
posts from your friends. 

• Profile: This displays your Profile page. 

• Friends: This displays an alphabetical list of 
all your friends. 

• Inbox: This displays any messages in your 
Facebook email box. 

• Chat: This lets you instant message in real 
time with your friends. 

• Requests: This displays any pending friend 
requests, and lets you respond to those 
requests. 

• Events: This displays any upcoming events you have scheduled. 

• Photos: This displays the photos you've uploaded to Facebook. 

• Notes: This displays any notes you've uploaded to Facebook. 



The Photos features on 
Facebook for iPhone is actu- 
ally a great way to carry 
your photo collection around 
with you, virtually. When you 
want to show someone your 
favorite pictures, just whip 
out your iPhone, launch the 
Facebook app, and press 
the Photos icon; you can 
then browse through and 
display photos from all your 
Facebook albums. 




Inbox Chat 



r 



Events Pholos 



Requests 



M ] Lew Archer changed the name of the ev.. 



Figure 19.1. The Facebook for iPhone Home screen. 



Connecting from Your iPhone 259 



There's also a Notifications bar at the bottom 
of the screen. Any unread Facebook notifica- 
tions are noted here; press the bar to view the 
notifications. 

By the way, you can navigate back to this 
Home screen at any time by pressing the 
Home button at the top left of any subsequent 
screen, as shown in Figure 19.2. 



Home- 



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4:15 PM 



cebook 



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You can add a shortcut but- 
ton for any of your friends to 
a second page of the Home 
screen. Just click the + but- 
ton at the top left of the Home 
screen; this displays your 
friends list. Tap the name of a 
friend and you create a button 
for that person's Profile page. 



V 



Figure 19.2. Tap the Home button to return to the Home screen. 



Viewing the News Feed 

If you're like me, you use your iPhone to catch up on friends' posts while 
you're on the go, or just lounging on the couch. This is probably what I use 
Facebook for iPhone for the most. 

To display the News Feed, tap the News Feed icon on the Home screen. 
This displays the News Feed screen, shown in Figure 19.3. This is your Top 
News feed, by the way; at present, there's no way to configure this to dis- 
play your Most Recent feed. 



Each post is similar to what you see on the 
web-based News Feed. You see the name the 
poster, the post itself, and any photos or other 
attachments. 

To comment on or "like" a post, press the + 
icon. This displays a blue bar with Like and 
Comment buttons, as shown in Figure 19.4. 



f&TirJ 



F 



To view a friend's Profile 
page from the News Feed, 
tap his or her name in a 
post. 



260 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 



Press the Comment button to display the Comment screen, shown in Figure 
19.5; type your comment and then click the Post button. To like a post, all 
you have to do is press the Like button. 



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Lance Family Reunion 



Figure 19.3. The Facebook for iPhone News Feed. 



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4:15 PM 



facebook Llve > 




Figure 19.4. Like or comment on a friend's status update. 



By the way, if a post has a picture attached, 
tap the picture to view it full screen. If there's 
a YouTube video attached, tap the video to 
begin playback. Unfortunately, at this point in 
time, the Facebook for iPhone app does not 
support playback of regular Facebook videos. 



(teiii 



To view other comments to 
a post, tap the Comment 
box underneath the post. 



Connecting from Your iPhone 261 




| E l R l T | Y | U | I pi 







Figure 19.5. Entering a comment. 



Posting a Status Update 

What I really like about using Facebook on my iPhone is being able to post 
status updates at any time, no matter where I am. Yeah, you have to hunt 
and peck with the iPhone's onscreen keyboard, but that's easier than trying 
to construct a text message from a traditional numeric keypad. 

You can post status updates from either the News Feed or Profile screens. 
Just follow these steps: 

1. From the Home screen, tap either News Feed or Profile. 

2. When the next page appears, tap within the Publisher ("What's on your 
mind?") box. 

3. This displays the Status Update screen, shown in Figure 19.6. Type your 
message into the text box. 

4. Tap the Share button to post your update. 



262 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 




Figure 19.6. Posting a new status update. 



Posting a Picture 

You can also post pictures you take with your iPhone. You can post either 
new pictures at the time you take them or photos you already have stored on 
your iPhone. 

Follow these steps to take a new photo: 

1. From the Home screen, tap either News Feed or Profile. 

2. When the next page appears, tap the Photo icon next to the Publisher box. 

3. When the Photo panel appears, as shown in Figure 19.7, tap Take Photo. 

4. This launches the iPhone's camera. Point your phone where you want to 
shoot and then tap the Photo button. 

5. When the photo appears on the next screen, as shown in Figure 19.8, tap 
Retake if you don't like it, or Use if you do. 



Connecting from Your iPhone 263 



4:16 PM 




Michael Miller "If everything 
i seems under control, you're not 
going fast enough." ■■ Mario Andrew. 
6 hours ago 

d 1 comment 

I Michael Miller Curvy brat 

l buns ■■ a miracle of modem science! 



Take Photo 



Choose From Library 



Cancel 



Figure 19.7. Getting ready to post a picture. 








Figure 19.8. Viewing the picture you're ready to post. 



6. When the next page appears, tap Write Caption to add some text to your 
update. When the Caption screen appears, enter your text then tap Done. 



264 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 

7. Tap Upload to upload the photo (and accompanying text) as a new status 
update. 

To upload an existing photo as a status update, follow these steps: 

1. From the Home screen, tap either News Feed or Profile. 

2. When the next page appears, tap the Photo icon next to the Publisher box. 

3. When the Photo panel appears, tap Choose from Library. 

4. When the Photo Albums screen appears, as shown in Figure 19.9, navigate 
to and tap the photo you want to upload. 




A Photo Library (146) > 



Figure 19.9. Choosing a picture to upload. 



5. When the next page appears, tap Write Caption to add some text to your 
update. When the Caption screen appears, enter your text then tap Done. 

6. Tap Upload to upload the photo (and accompanying text) as a new status 
update. 



Connecting from Your iPhone 265 

Viewing Friends' Profiles 

Viewing a friend's profile on your iPhone is relatively easy. Just tap Friends 
from the Home screen to display a full list of your Facebook friends. Scroll to 
and tap the name of the friend you want to view. 

Figure 19.10 shows a typical Profile page on the iPhone. There are three tabs 
at the bottom of the page: Wall, Info, and Photos. The Wall tab displays your 
friend's Wall, complete with recent status updates. The Info tab displays very 
basic (not complete) information about your friend. And the Photos tab dis- 
plays your friend's photo albums. 




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Figure 19. 10. Viewing a Profile page with Facebook for iPhone. 

You can post a message to your friend's wall simply by tapping the 
Publisher box near the top of the page. When the Wall Post screen appears, 
enter your message and then tap Share. 



Checking Messages 

You can also use your iPhone to check your Facebook messages while 
you're on the go. Just tap the Inbox icon on the Home screen to display the 
Inbox screen, shown in Figure 19.11. Tap a message snippet to read the 
entire message. 



266 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 



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£ Load New Messages 



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Sandy > 

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Do you still have that book I loaned you 
last month? I need it for one of my... 

Tom French 3/7/10 

Update ^ 

Just wanted to let you know that the 
project is on schedule and should be co... 



Figure 19.11. Viewing the Facebook for iPhone inbox. 



Chatting with Friends 

Finally, you can indulge in on-the-go instant messaging via the Facebook for 
iPhone app. Click the Chat icon on the Home screen to display a screen of 
online friends. Tap a friend's name to begin the chat session. 

Figure 19.12 shows what the Chat screen looks like on the iPhone. Use the 
onscreen keyboard to type a message, then tap the Send button. Your chat 
session is displayed at the top of the screen. 



Connecting from Other Smartphones 267 



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chat Michael Miller profile 




Figure 19. 12. Chatting in real time with Facebook for iPhone. 



Connecting from Other Smartphones 

The iPhone isn't the only smartphone supported by Facebook. There are 
Facebook apps for all the following phones: 

Android 

Blackberry 

INQ 

Nokia 

Palm 

Sidekick 

Sony Ericsson 

Windows Mobile 



268 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 

All these apps work similarly to the Facebook for iPhone app. For example, 
Figure 19.13 shows the News Feed on Facebook for Android; it looks a lot 
like the News Feed screen on the iPhone. 



SE 



facebook 



SID O 2:12 PM 



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I Alison Rosenthal six's afraid of seven 
OJZ789 
Yesterday at 11:08 PM 
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Yesterday at 9:46 PM 



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Yesterday at 9:38 PM 
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I Alex Wu And we can ride the boogie 
Yesterday at 9:1 5 PM 



Q Comment 



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ruhhnrro on *hfr hnr 



Figure 19.13. The News Feed screen on Facebook for Android. 



If your web-enabled phone doesn't have a dedicated Facebook app, you 
can still use your phone's Web browser to connect to the Facebook Mobile 
website. Just navigate to rn.facebook.com and you see a version of the 
Facebook site that's optimized for mobile browsers. As you can see in 
Figure 19.14, the Home page displays your News Feed, with the Publisher 
box at the top. Other tabs display your Profile page, your Friends list, and 
the messages in your Inbox. 



Connecting via Text Message 269 



facebook 

Home Profile Friends Inbox (1) 



You have 1 relationship request 

What's on your mind? 



News Feed 

Top News ■ Most Recent 

ft Lew Archer 




4 minutes ago 
Comment - Like 

JL Michael Miller "ir everything seems under 
control, you're not going fast enough." - 
Mario Andretti. 

5 hnurs ann 



Figure 19. 14. The Home page of the Facebook Mobile site. 



Connecting via Text Message 



How can you connect to Facebook if you don't have a fancy smartphone? 
It's easy, really, as Facebook enables you to post via simple SMS text mes- 
sages from any mobile phone. You can also receive text messages when 
your friends post to their Walls. 

To use Facebook via text, you first have to activate your individual phone. 
Here's how to do it: 

1. Click Account on the Facebook toolbar and then click Account Settings. 

2. When the My Account page appears, click the Mobile tab. 

3. When the Mobile tab appears, click the Register for Facebook Text 
Messages link. 

4. When the Activate Facebook Texts dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 
19.15, select your country and mobile phone carrier from the lists and then 
click Next. 



270 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 



Activate Facebook Texts (Step 1 of 3] 



Please choose your country and mobile service provider below. x 
United States [V] Choose a carrier [<*] 



Figure 19. 15. Activating Facebook texts. 

>. The next dialog box contains instructions on how to register your phone. 
You need to use your phone to text the short message displayed here to 
the number listed (32665 or FBOOK) and then click Next. 

>. Facebook replies to your text with a unique mobile activation code. Enter 
this code into the next dialog box on your computer screen and click 
Confirm. 

J. Facebook displays the confirmation page shown in Figure 19.16. This page 
lists all the different notifications that can be sent to your phone— mes- 
sages, wall posts, comments, friend requests, and the like. Check those 
notifications you want to receive as text messages and uncheck those you 
don't. 



Settings Networks Notifications 



Language Payments Facebook Ads 



Go to Facebook Mobile I 



FacebookText Messages are now activated. Text 32665 (FBOOK) to update your status. You can 
also receive texts when people poke r message, wall post r or friend you. Learn more about Facebook 
Tent Messages 



FacebookText Messages 

Texts are: 
ft On © Off 

Which text notifications should go to my phone? 

[7] Messages 

\7\ Wall posts 

[p] Comments on my status 

pi Friend requests 

[V] Photo tags 

|F| Comment on my photos 

|~J Comments on my notes 

□ Pokes 



Figure 19.16. Configuring text messaging for your Facebook account 



Connecting via Text Message 271 

8. Scroll down to the Whose Status Updates Should Go to My Phone? section 
and enter the names of those friends whose status updates you want to 
receive as text messages. 

9. To limit when you receive text messages (for example, to not receive mes- 
sages while you're sleeping), scroll to the What Times Should Texts Be 
Sent to My Phone? section and specify a time range, or check the Anytime 
option. 

10. If your phone's text plan is limited, scroll to the How Many Texts Should Be 
Sent? section and enter how many daily texts you want to receive, maxi- 
mum. 

11. If you want to receive a confirmation text every time you make a post, scroll 
to that section and check Yes. 

12. When you're done configuring, click the Save Preferences button. 

After you have your phone activated and configured, you can send status 
updates to Facebook via text messages from your phone. All you have to do 
is send your texts to 32665 (or FBOOK) and you're good to go. 



Facebook Mobile? Really? 



Okay, I almost hesitated to add this chapter to the book. That's because 
using Facebook on a mobile phone is something that the young folks 
do— a lot. It's a less popular option for us older, texting-challenged 
people. 

As you're well aware, the young people today are born with mobile 
phones grafted onto their palms. They emerge from the womb texting 
about the experience: "dr hit me rdy 4 Inch." 

To the younger generation, texting is as natural as breathing. It's no sur- 
prise that they often opt to do the Facebook thing via cell phone, too. 
They always have their phones with them; their computers, not so much. 
So they do the configuration thing and receive friend's updates and 
messages via text messages, and make their own posts via texts, as 
well. It works well for them. 

Us older folks, however, are less comfortable with and often less skilled 
at the whole texting thing. My stepdaughter can do ten texts in the time 



272 CHAPTER 19 Using Facebook on the Go 



it takes me to peck out a single one, and I've yet to figure out all the 
shortcuts and abbreviations she uses. It's kind of like a foreign language 
to me, one that requires the punching of teeny buttons with pudgy fin- 
gers. It's not a good fit. 

So my sense is that grown-ups use Facebook on their phones far less often 
than do their offspring. That doesn't mean it doesn't have its place in your 
bag of tricks, or that you'll never do it. But I'm guessing you'll use your 
phone to make a few posts when you're away from home or the office, but 
probably not opt to receive text updates. Our generation is a more patient 
one; we can wait to check our News Feed when we're back at the computer, 
thank you very much. 



Chaffy 20 



Buying and Selling in the 
Facebook Marketplace 

Facebook is all about making social connections. But there's 
also a part of Facebook is more about commerce than con- 
nections. The Facebook Marketplace, as it's called, is kind of 
like classified ads for and by Facebook members. You can 
use the Marketplace to find items for sale by your friends and 
others on Facebook, or put stuff of your own up for sale. 

Understanding the Facebook 
Marketplace 

The Facebook Marketplace isn't a true marketplace, per se. 
It's really a database of classified advertisements. In this 
respect it's more like Craigslist than it is eBay. 

Like Craigslist, the Facebook Marketplace is a listing service 
for online classified ads. You don't actually purchase an item 
from the Facebook Marketplace; you contact a seller and 
arrange the purchase directly from him. Facebook doesn't 
get involved with payment or shipping or anything like that. 

The Facebook Marketplace is also like Craigslist in that there 
are no buyer or seller protections. If you send somebody 
money based on a Facebook ad and they don't ship the 
item, you're out of luck. Same thing if you sell something to 
someone and their check bounces. Don't even bother con- 
tacting Facebook about it. 

It's all about personal transactions. You see an ad in the 
Facebook Marketplace, you contact the seller (via Facebook 
email), you agree on a purchase price, and you pay the seller 



274 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 

directly. The seller then ships you the item or, if you live nearby, you go and 
pick it up. As I said, Facebook really isn't involved, saved for hosting the ini- 
tial listing. 

What can you buy or sell on the Facebook Marketplace? That's easy enough 
to see by examining the categories of goods and services listed on the 
Facebook site: 

• Stuff: These are the "merchandise for sale" categories, including Adult; 
Baby & Kid Stuff; Clothes & Accessories; Collectibles; Computers; Crafts 
& Hobbies; Electronics; Free; Furniture; Garage & Yard Sales; Health 

& Beauty; Home & Garden; Movies, Music & Video Games; Musical 
Instruments; Office & Biz; Sporting Goods & Bicycles; Textbooks; and 
Everything Else. 

• Vehicles: That's right, you can find all manner of vehicles listed for sale in 
the Facebook Marketplace, including Airplanes, Boats, Cars, Commercial 
Trucks, Heavy Equipment, Motorcycles, Parts & Accessories, Power Sports, 
RVs, and Everything Else. (You can also shop by make of vehicle, in case 
you're specifically looking for a Ford or a Honda or whatever.) 

• Rentals: The Facebook Marketplace isn't just for buyers and sellers; it's 
also for renters. The categories here include Apartments, Commercial, 
Condos, Homes, Open Houses, Roommates, Short Term, Vacations, and 
Other. 

• Houses: If you're looking to buy or sell property, look here for Commercial, 
Condos, Foreclosures, Homes, Land, Mobile Homes, Multi Family, Open 
Houses, Vacation Property, and Other. 

• Jobs: Just like traditional classified ads, the Facebook Marketplace 
includes lots and lots of job listings that you can search by location. 

• Services: It's not just about buying and selling things; the Facebook 
Marketplace is also a good place to buy and sell services, from music les- 
sons to lawn care. Categories include Auto; Career; Child & Elderly Care; 
Cleaning; Coupons; Creative; Financial; Food & Restaurants; Health & 
Beauty; Home, Lawn & Garden; Legal; Lessons; Moving & Storage; Party 
& Entertain; Pet Services; Real Estate; Tech Help; Travel & Transportation; 
and Everything Else. 



Shopping for Something to Buy 275 



L^Note 



• Tickets: Want to buy tickets for a sold-out 

concert? Have some spare tickets to sell? 

Then check out these Tickets categories: 

Concerts, Group Events, Sports, Theater, and Even though it's very 

Other. well integrated into 

the Facebook site, the 
You can filter the items in these categories by Facebook Marketplace 

location (X number of miles from your ZIP code), is actually a third-party 
or just look at listings from your friends or friends appli , cation ^ 0od I e ' 
of your friends. You can browse the categories 
or just search for something specific. And it's all 
done from within the main Facebook site. 



which is wholly endorsed 
by Facebook. 



Shopping for Something to Buy 

The thinking behind the Facebook Marketplace is that buyers will be more 
comfortable buying from people within or connected to their social circle. 
There's also the conceit, I suppose, that sellers who are Facebook members 
are somehow more reliable than sellers you find on other websites. I'm not 
sure I buy into that conceit, but do find that there's a lot of good stuff for 
sale on the Facebook Marketplace. 

Browsing the Marketplace 

When you're looking for something to buy, follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Marketplace in the sidebar. 

2. This opens the Facebook Marketplace page, shown in Figure 20.1. By 
default, the page opens to listings in the city you specified in your profile 
information. To change the city listed, click the Change link after the city 
name; when the Location dialog box appears, enter a new city name or ZIP 
code and then pull down the Radius list and select how far away you want 
to search. Click the Submit button when done. 

3. Click the tab for the category you want to browse: All, Stuff, Vehicles, 
Rentals, Houses, Jobs, Services, or Tickets. 

4. When the category page appears, like the one in Figure 20.2, click the 
subcategory you want to browse. (The Jobs category is the only one that 
doesn't have subcategories.) 



276 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 



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Commercial Trucks 


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Figure 20. 1. The main Facebook Marketplace page. 



j*fl Marketplace Minneapolis, MN (d 



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Stuff 


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Social Circle 

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Subcategory 

Adult (2) 

Baby fi. Kid Stuff (10] 

Clothes & Accessories [SU] 

Collectibles (10) 

Computers {19} 

Crafts & Hobbies (2] 

Electronics {75] 

Everything Else [61] 

Free 

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Results l -as of 454 




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Finally, you can now get your cash when the customer 
clicks "buy" 



Dear Friend, Affiliate marketing is a great way to earn 
online, but it has one disadvantage. You... 



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Minneapolis, MN 1 1 how ago El Comment 0^} tike 



Make and List Your Own VIDEOS 



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Figure 20.2. A main category page. 



Shopping for Something to Buy 277 

5. When the subcategory page appears, use the category-specific controls in 
the sidebar to further filter the results, if you want. For example, the Clothes 
& Accessories subcategory, shown in Figure 20.3, lets you filter listings by 
price range, or to only show those listings with photos. 



Location 

55337, USA +50 miles 

Social Circle 

Friends 

Friends & Friends of Friends 

Category 
• Back to Stuff 
ClotJies & Accessories 



Price 






| fco| H^h 




Photo 


With Picture Only {«} 


Keyword 


1 H 



Figure 20.3. A subcategory page, with filters for price range and photos. 



6. To view a specific listing, click its title. 



Searching the Marketplace 

If you have a specific item in mind, it's faster to search for it than try to find it 
via browsing. Follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Marketplace in the sidebar. 

2. When the Facebook Marketplace page appears, click the tab for the cat- 
egory you want to search: All, Stuff, Vehicles, Rentals, Houses, Jobs, 
Services, or Tickets. 

3. Enter a short description of what you're looking for into the Find box at the 
top of the page, as shown in Figure 20.4. 



All Stuff Vehicles Rentals Houses Jobs Services Tickets 



I 



55337 {*H> m ?.=0 



Figure 20.4. Searching for items on the Facebook Marketplace. 



278 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 



4. By default, Facebook searches within 50 miles of the city you specified in 
your profile information. To change the search range, click the Change link 
in the Location box (next to the Find box). When the Location dialog box 
appears, enter a new city name or ZIP code, then pull down the Radius list 
and select how far away you want to search. Click the Submit button when 
you're done. 

5. To begin your search, click the Search button. 

6. Facebook displays listings that match your query, as shown in Figure 20.5. 
To view a specific listing, click its title. 



Results 1 -soFs 





120GB PS3 +6 Games + 1 Controllers + Blu-Ray Remote 
Why? 1 bought an Applet* 

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month old PS3 - Got an Apple TV [before... 



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Mirireapofe. MN 1 Zeaya aco 



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Barfivifle, MN' 3 days aco 



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The ORB Vintage 1982 Puzzle Game by Parker Brothers 

(Rubiks Cube) for 529.97 

Why? T^or sale on eBay via Buy-It-Now listing. See it here:...' 

■ "The ORB" Vintage 19B2 Puzzle Game by Parker Brothers 
[makers of the Rubiks Cube). For sale on... 



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Figure 20.5. The results of a Facebook Marketplace search. 



Viewing an Item Listing 

Everything you need to know about an item for sale is on the item's listing 
page. This is the page you see when you click the item's title in the market- 
place listings. As you can see in Figure 20.6, there are typically two tabs on 
this page; the Listing Details tab, which is the one in which you're interested, 
and the All Listings from Seller tab, which lists other items for sale from this 
Facebook person. 



Shopping for Something to Buy 279 



Listing Details All Listings from Michael 










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For Sale: 




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Price: $200 




^BfciJP^"""™ ^*Z9 Category: Stuff : Musical Instruments 




Personal Profile 

Profile: 
Michael Miller 




Koscea: l minute ago in Hurnsviiie, nil 

Description: 1974 vintage Fibes snare drum. 5" x 14' 
and snares. Antique copper finish. 


Perfect condition, new heads 


Photos 




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Recent Listings: 

2 listings in the last month 
























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Figure 20.6. A typical Facebook Marketplace listing. 

The Listing Details tab includes information 
both about the seller (in the sidebar on the 
left) and the item for sale. The item information 
includes details such as why the seller is selling 
it, a detailed item description, and photos of 
the item. 



(G 



<<Tip 



^ 



^ 



To learn more about the 
seller, which might or might 
not increase your confi- 
dence level, click the sell- 
er's name in the Personal 
Profile box in the sidebar. 



Sharing and Commenting on a Listing 

If you think this item is something in which your Facebook friends might be 
interested, you can share it with them via a status update or private mes- 
sage. Click the Share button to display the Post to Profile dialog box, enter 
some accompanying text and then click the Share button to post this listing 
as a status update. To send as a private message, open the Post to Profile 
dialog box, click the Send as a Message Instead link, and then enter the 
names of your intended recipients. 



280 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 

You can also comment on a given listing, just as you would comment on a 
status update. Scroll to the bottom of the listing page and enter your com- 
ment into the Comments box, then click the Comment & Share button. Your 
comment is listed to the bottom of the listing itself. 

For that matter, you can "like" a listing just as you can like a status update. 
Just click the Like icon above the listing. 



Contacting a Seller— and Buying Something 

The Facebook Marketplace only facilitates the sales of merchandise; you 
don't involve Facebook in the actual sale. Instead, you contact the seller 
directly, haggle to your heart's content, and then pay the seller directly. 

To contact a seller, follow these steps: 

1. Open the item listing page and click the Respond button. 

2. When the Respond to Seller dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 20.7, 
enter your email address in the From box. 





Respond to Michael Miller 










Stav Safe with Facebook Marketplace 

V Marketplace hides your email address from the seller. 

V Marketplace is always on the lookout for fraud. 
















u 


From: This Facebook User 




c 




V/= 'i~- "■= ■;." =""= =:':== :: ptifest y-:-* 'rerr = p=.rr : r z ' r i.z 












■S 


To: Michael Miller 

Subject: Re: Fibes Snare Drum 












Enter your message to Michael Miller * 






VI Allow marketplace to share my Profile name and image with the seller' 







Figure 20.7. Responding to an item for sale. 



Selling Your Own Stuff 281 



3. Enter your message into the large text box. 
This should be something along the lines of 
"I'm interested in buying this thing. Please 
contact me so we can discuss." 

4. By default, Facebook shares your Profile 
information with the seller. If you'd rather 
not, uncheck the Allow Marketplace to 
Share My Profile Name and Image with the 
Seller Option. (Know, however, that some 
sellers might not respond to an anonymous 
buyer.) 

5. Click the Submit button. 

Facebook sends your message to the seller. 
If the seller is interested, he'll get back in 
touch with you via Facebook. It's up to the 
two of you to negotiate the final price, arrange 
payment, and get the thing shipped to you. 
In other words, it's now out of Facebook's 
hands. 



Selling Your Own Stuff 

Where do the listings in the Facebook 
Marketplace come from? From your fellow 
Facebook members, of course. Which means 
that you can also use the marketplace to list 
items you want to sell. 



rGFFi^ 



V 



Given that Facebook, by 
default, displays only those 
listings within 50 miles of 
your location, you might want 
to pick up the item rather 
than have it shipped to you. 



t+++ 



Caution 



A 



The usual cautions apply 
when you're purchasing any 
item through the Facebook 
Marketplace as they do 
when purchasing any item 
found via a classified adver- 
tisement. It's always good 
to see the item before you 
buy, you should take care 
when visiting a seller's resi- 
dence, and, after you get 
the item, it's pretty much 
caveat emptor— let the 
buyer beware. 



Listing an Item for Sale 

There is no charge for listing items on the Facebook Marketplace. That's 
right, unlike eBay, all listings are free— the seller doesn't pay, nor does the 
buyer. So list as many items as you'd like, it won't cost you anything but 
your time. 



282 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 

To list an item for sale, follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Marketplace in the sidebar. 

2. When the Facebook Marketplace page appears, click the Post a Listing link 
at the top of the page. 

3. When the Post Listing dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 20.8, enter 
your Location (country and ZIP code). 



Post a Listing 




Location:* United States [^ 


] 55337] 






Category:* Select a Category 




a 


^required 















Figure 20.8. Getting ready to list an item for sale. 



4. Pull down the Category list and make a selection: Stuff (items for sale), 
Vehicles, Rentals, Houses, Jobs, Services, or Tickets. 

5. After you select a category, the Post Listing dialog box expands with 
category-specific boxes, as shown in Figure 20.9. Select the relevant 
Subcategory from the pull-down list. 




Location;* United States Q [55337 



Category:* stuff 



Su bca tegoryr* Select a Subcategory 
Title* 



Description:* 



b 



Photo[ 5 ): [ choose File | no file chosen 

*reqi_iired 



H 





(?) For Sale C'Free U Wanted 


pricE 








Why a re you selling it? 










A 















Figure 20.9. The more complete Post Listing dialog box. 



Selling Your Own Stuff 283 



6. Enter the title for your listing into the Title box. 



L^Note 



7. If you're selling the item, make sure the For 

Sale option is checked and then enter your 

... -ij.il-,- i Facebook also lets you 

selling price into the Price box. ra^uw^ a , au , CLa yuu 

give away items for free 

8. Enter the reason for your sale into the Why (check the Free option) 
Are You Selling It? box. or let people know you're 

looking to buy a given 

9. Enter a detailed description of the item into jtem (check the Wanted 

the Description box. Include all relevant option) 

details, including age, size, color, condition, 
and the like. 

10. Because most items sell faster if they're accompanied by photos, you 
should take a few digital photos of what you're selling. To upload these 
photos, click the Choose File button to display the Open dialog box; navi- 
gate to and select the file(s) to upload and then click the Open button. 

11. If you uploaded one or more photos, check the option that says you have 
the right to distribute these photos. 

12. Click the Post button. 

13. You're now prompted to post this listing as a Facebook status update. 
Click the Publish button to do so, or click Skip to not post it. 

That's it; your listing is now live. 

Ending Your Listing 

If and when a fellow Facebook member is interested in your item, you 
receive a message from that person, via Facebook, to that effect. You can 
then reply to that person and answer questions, accept the offer, arrange for 
shipment or pickup, or whatever. You are under no obligation to sell to any 
given person. What kind of payment you accept (cash, check, whatever) is 
totally up to you. 

After you sell an item, you need to remove it from the Facebook Marketplace. 
To do this, follow these steps: 

1. Go to the Facebook Home page and click Marketplace in the sidebar. 

2. When the Facebook Marketplace page appears, click the My Account link 
at the top of the page. 



284 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 

3. This displays the listings page, shown in Figure 20.10, with the All Listings 
tab selected. Go to the listing you want to end and click the Close link for 
that listing. 



pH Arfivr Tnarfivip 






Res,. Is 1 - G of G 






Selling Fibes Snare Drum 

^F^^^^^ Too many snare drums! ' 




ID: 2029002942 


Active: 30 days remaining 
Views 1 


H^fijH Upgrade with a Facebook Ad 
I^I^^H Close 


Edit Details Promote to Top of Results 




Comments none 


Selling Sabian crash cymbal 16" 




ID: 2028997581 


Active: 30 days remaining 


"No longer use this cymbal' 






Views none 


U pg rad e with a Facebook Ad Edit Details 


Promote to Top of Results Close 




Comments: none 


Selling Old Guitar 




ID: 2027261135 


Ctosed! Click to Activate 


I^Et M\ 'Don'tneed it anymore.' 






Views 2 


FrHj Edit Details Activate 






Comments 1 


Selling Ludwkj Supraphonic Snare Drum 




ID: 1316325334 


Expired: March 25,2010 


Too many snare drums' 






Views none 


RepostB Share 






Comments; none 


Selling Sabian crash cymbal 16" 




ID: 1670912157 


Expired: December 19 r 2009 


"No longer use this cymbal' 






Views none 
Comments none 


Selling Large vial of crud 




ID: 1670902599 


Expired: December 19 T 2009 


T don't like crud' 






Views none 


Repost fi Share 






Comments: none 



Figure 20. 10. All of your listings displayed on a single page. 

4. When the Close Listing dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 20.1 1 , 
check Yes if you sold the item, or No if it didn't sell but you want to close 
the listing anyway. 



Close Listing 




Figure 20. 1 1. Closing a Facebook Marketplace listing. 



Selling Your Own Stuff 285 



5. Click the Close Listing button. 



6. You're now prompted to publish your closed listing as a Facebook status 
update. To do so, click the Publish button. To not do so, click Skip. 

And that's how the Facebook Marketplace works. Pretty simple, really. 

Facebook Marketplace Versus eBay and Craigslist 

If you've been around the Internet for any length of time, you're probably 
familiar with the other, more well-known marketplaces for buying and 
selling merchandise— eBay and Craigslist. You might be wondering how 
the Facebook Marketplace compares to both. 

Comparing the Facebook Marketplace to eBay is a bit of an apples to 
oranges sort of proposition. That's because eBay functions as a full- 
service middleman. eBay not only facilitates item listings, it also handles 
all contact between buyers and sellers, offers payment services (via 
PayPal), provides assistance for shipping (via the USPS and others), 
and offers a buyer protection plan to guard against fraudulent sellers. 
Facebook does none of these things. 

In addition, eBay offers both fixed-price listings and those fun online 
auctions, where potential buyers bid up the price on items for sale. 
Facebook offers only fixed-price listings, with no apparatus in place for 
conducting online auctions. 

Craigslist offers a more relevant comparison. Like Craigslist, Facebook 
is essentially a service for online classified ads. Neither Facebook or 
Craigslist offer payment services, shipping assistance, or buyer protec- 
tion plans. Both are purely item listings only, leaving the ultimate sale for 
the buyers and sellers to arrange between themselves. 

The big difference between Craigslist and the Facebook Marketplace is 
one of size. Craigslist offers many times more items for sale than does 
Facebook, so you're more likely to find what you want there. If you're 



286 CHAPTER 20 Buying and Selling in the Facebook Marketplace 



a seller, Craigslist offers many more potential buyers than does the 
Facebook Marketplace; despite Facebook's size, relatively few members 
actually use the Facebook Marketplace. 

So you might want to give the Facebook Marketplace a spin, but know that 
Craigslist is always there if you can't find what you want— or, if you're selling 
and you don't get any buyers. 



Part V| 



Basic Facebook 
Housekeeping Chores 



21 Keeping Some Things Private 

22 Managing Your Facebook Account 



This page intentionally left blank 



C/uwtef 21 



Keeping Some Things 
Private 



Facebook is not a paragon of privacy. It's a social net- 
work, after all, and being social means sharing of oneself. 
In Facebook's case, it also means sharing all your personal 
information by default— which is certainly one way to network 
with others. 

Unfortunately, all this sharing poses a problem for those of 
us who'd prefer to maintain some semblance of a private life. 
If you share everything with everyone, then all sorts of infor- 
mation can get out— and be seen by people you don't want 
seeing it. It's a bit of a challenge, and ultimately it involves a 
degree of compromise to maintain a social profile while pro- 
tecting your personal privacy. 

Understanding Facebook Privacy 

Facebook is all about connecting users to one another. 
That's how the site functions, after all, by encouraging 
"friends" and all sorts of public sharing of information. 

You can understand why Facebook operates in this fashion. 
The powers that be think they can better connect users with 
one another, and build a stronger community, by making 
public all of a user's likes and dislikes. After all, how can you 
connect to others if you don't know anything about them? 

I admit, all this makes some degree of sense in the abstract; 
the more we know about each other, the more likely we are 
to find people to interact with. But Facebook might take this 
openness a tad too far. 



290 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 



That's because Facebook, by default, shares 
all your information with just about every- 
body. Not just your friends, or friends of your 
friends, but the entire membership of the site. 
And not just with Facebook members, either; 
Facebook also shares your information with 
third-party applications and games and with 
other sites on the Web. 

Do you really want your personal information 
and Facebook status updates shared with mil- 
lions of strangers and hundreds of thousands 
of unrelated websites? I think most people 
would say no, but this is precisely what 
Facebook now does— unless you specify oth- 
erwise. 

So, by default, Facebook tries to link all sorts 
of things together. It shares your Facebook 
data with partner websites, in the guise of 
helping those sites "personalize" their content 
for you. It shares your name with entertainers 
and companies you say you like, to help them 
"connect" with you as a fan. And it shares your 
personal information and the posts you make 
to everyone on the Facebook site, even if you'd 
rather keep that information private. 

Fortunately, you can configure Facebook 
to be much less public than it is by default. 
While this originally was somewhat difficult 
to do (Facebook didn't put all the settings in 
the same place— or make them easy to find, 
for that matter), Facebook has made some 
changes that make it a trifle easier to control 
which people and what applications can see 
your personal information. 






ote 



This sharing with other web 
sites is part of Facebook's 
Open Graph technology, 
which helps other sites link 
to the Facebook site. This 
can come in the form of a 
common sign-in (you log 
onto the other site using 
your Facebook ID and pass 
word), a Facebook "like" 
button on the other site, 
or the wholesale sharing 
of information about you 
between the two sites. 



_^ 



i" "1 



ote 



Why does Facebook 
encourage this wholesale 
sharing of your private 
information? It's all about 
Facebook's apparent 
quest for world domina- 
tion. Facebook wants to 
be your gateway to the 
Internet, your home page 
on the Web, or, let's be 
honest, your entire online 
operating system. Nice for 
them, less so for you or 
anyone who values his or 
her online privacy. 






Changing Facebook's Privacy Settings 291 

Changing Facebook's Privacy Settings 

Most of Facebook's privacy settings can be accessed from a single gateway 
page. Not all settings are on this page, but you can get to them from here. 

To display the Choose Your Privacy Settings page, shown in Figure 21 .1 , 
click Account on the Facebook toolbar and select Privacy Settings. The page 
you now see leads you to everything privacy-related on the site. 



Choose Your Privacy Settings 


ET1 Basic Directory Information 

To help real world friends find you, some basic information is open to everyone. We also suggest setting basics like hometown 
and interests to everyone so friends can use those to connect with you. View settings 

[0 Sharing on Facebook 




Everyone 
Friends of Friends 
Friends Only 


Everyone Friends of Friends Friends Only 


My status, photos, and posts ■ 
Bio and favorite quotations ■ 
Family and relationships ■ 


Photos and videos I'm tagged in ■ 
Religious and political views ■ 
Birthday ■ 


Recommended V 




Can comment on posts ■ 


Email addresses and IM ■ 


Phone numbers and address ■ 
Why are these settings recommended? 


i/ Customize settings <# This is your current setting, 


0Q 
WB 


Applications and Websites 

Edit your settings for using applications 
games and websites. 


O Block Lists ^ Controlling How You Share 

Edit your lists of blocked people and Learn more about your privacy on Facebook. 
applications. 



Figure 21.1. Facebook's Choose Your Privacy Settings gateway page. 



Sharing Your Personal Information — or Not 

You configure most of your important privacy settings directly from the 
Choose Your Privacy Settings page. It's the Sharing on Facebook section 
that's key, as this is where you tell Facebook what information you want to 
share with whom. 



292 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 



There are nine settings included in this section: 

• My status, photos, and posts: Literally, your status updates, photo 
uploads, and other Facebook posts. 



Bio and favorite quotations: Your detailed 
biography, as well as your favorite quota- 
tions. 

Family and relationships: Any family 
members you've identified, as well as your 
relationship status— and who you're in a 
relationship with. 

Photos and videos I'm tagged in: These 
aren't your photos and videos, but rather 
uploads from your friends and other users 
in which you're tagged. 



I 



Caution 



A 



Pay particular attention 
to the Photos and Videos 
I'm Tagged In setting. You 
want to protect against 
any "friends" who upload 
compromising pictures or 
movies of you. (And they 
might exist, too!) 



• Religious and political views: The religious and political affiliations you 
entered as part of your profile. (Who really needs to know where you go to 
church — or how you voted in the last election?) 

• Birthday: Sounds innocuous, but as you get older, your age can work 
against you. Why publicize how old you are? 

• Can comment on posts: This controls who can leave comments to your 
status updates. After all, you might not want any comments. 

• Email addresses and IM: This is a good one. Do you really want to pub- 
licly display your online contact info? 

• Phone number and address: Ditto with this. It's not necessarily a good 
idea to have real-world contact information displayed for any weirdo (or ex- 
boyfriend or -girlfriend) to see. 

You can choose to share any of these items with everyone on the Facebook 
site, your friends on Facebook (that is Friends Only), and your friends and 
their friends (that is, Friends of Friends). 

To apply the same sharing settings across all these items, select Everyone, 
Friends of Friends, or Friends Only to the left of the list. Even better, select 
Recommended and Facebook applies the settings as shown in Table 21 .1 . 



Changing Facebook's Privacy Settings 293 

Table 21.1 Facebook's Recommended Privacy Settings 

Sharing Option Setting 



My status, photos, and posts 


Everyone 


Bio and favorite quotations 


Everyone 


Family and relationships 


Everyone 


Photos and videos I'm tagged in 


Friends of Friends 


Religious and political views 


Friends of Friends 


Birthday 


Friends of Friends 


Can comment on posts 


Friends Only 


Email addresses and IM 


Friends Only 


Phone numbers and address 


Friends Only 



Setting Custom Sharing Options 

So far so good. But what if you don't want to share your photos with every- 
one? Or what if don't want to share your phone number with anyone? 
(Note a lack of "no one" as a sharing option.) Well, now we have to go to 
Facebook's custom sharing settings. 

To set custom settings, go to the Choose Your Privacy Settings page, click 
the Customize Settings link. This displays the Customize Settings page, 
shown in Figure 21.2, which has a lot more options than the previous page. 

There are three reasons I like this Customize Settings page. First, this page 
offers a lot more things that you can configure— specific contact information, 
website info, and the like. Next, you can choose the three primary sharing 
options (Everyone, Friends of Friends, and Friends Only) for each specific 
item, not just for groups of items. And, most important, for each item listed, 
you indicate specific people who either can or cannot see that piece of infor- 
mation. For that matter, you can choose to hide any given item from every- 
one except yourself. 



294 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 



Choose Your Privacy Settings * Customize settings 



« Back to Privacy 



Customize who can see and comment on things you share, things on your Wall and things you're tagged in. 



Things I sha re 



Preview Mv Profile 



Posts by me I jj Everyone ^ I 




Family | fl Everyone ▼ | 




Relationships | a Everyone ,. | 




Interested in and looking for 1 a Everyone ▼ 1 




Bio and favorite quotations 1 n Everyone ▼ 1 






Website | a Everyone -r \ 




Religioiisand political views | a Friends of Friends -r 




Birthday | a Friends of Friends t 



Edit album privacy for existing photos. 



Figure 21.2. Customizing Facebook's sharing settings. 

How does it work? Follow these steps to customize any given sharing set- 
ting: 

1. From the Customize Settings page, click the big button to the far right of 
the item and then click Customize. This displays the Custom Privacy dialog 
box, shown in Figure 21.3. 



Custom Privacy 



^ Ma lee this visible to 



These people: Specific People,., |T| 



Enter a Name or List 



These people: Enter a Name or List 



Figure 21.3. Determining which individuals can or can't view specific information. 



Hiding Your Information from Other Websites 295 



5. 



To hide an item from everyone, pull down 
the Make This Visible To list and select Only 
Me. 

To make an item visible only to specific peo- 
ple, pull down the Make This Visible To list 
and select Specific People and then enter 
the names of those Facebook users you 
want to see the info. 

To hide an item only from specific people, 
enter their names into the Hide This From 
box. (This is a good way to hide specific info 
from your boss or spouse— or your kids.) 

Click the Save Setting button when you're 
done. 



01% 



Hiding Your Information 
from Other Websites 



Remember, you can also 
determine who can view 
your status updates on a 
post-by-post basis. When 
you enter a new status 
update, you see a lock 
icon with a down arrow 
beneath the text box; click 
this to display the privacy 
menu of Everyone, Friends 
of Friends, Only Friends, 
or Customize. Make your 
selection and this particular 
post will only be viewable 
by the group you select. 



One big concern I have with Facebook is how much of my information it 
shares with other websites. Facebook is on a drive, it seems, to connect 
everybody with everything, and that means sharing as much information as 
possible with other sites— which is something not everyone is comfortable 
with. 

So here's a simple way to make sure Facebook doesn't share your informa- 
tion with other websites: Don't log onto these sites with your Facebook pro- 
file! That's right, if a website doesn't know you're on Facebook, or who you 
are on Facebook, it can't link to your Facebook profile. So when you go to 
a site and you're prompted to use your Facebook ID to log in, just don't do 
it. Use your normal ID for that site instead — and if you don't yet have an ID, 
establish one separate from your Facebook ID. 

There's more. If, when you visit a website, you see a blue bar at the top of 
the page informing you that this site is using Facebook "to personalize your 
experience," you'll also see a "No Thanks" link in the bar. Click "No Thanks" 
and the site won't use your Facebook data. 



296 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 



In addition, you can configure Facebook to turn off this data-sharing feature. 
Follow these steps to disable what Facebook calls "instant personalization:" 

1. Navigate to the Choose Your Privacy Settings page. 

2. Click the Edit Your Settings link in the Applications and Websites section at 
the bottom of the page. 

3. When the next page appears, scroll to the Instant Personalization section 
and click the Edit Settings button. 

4. When the following page appears, as shown in Figure 21 .4, uncheck the 
Enable Instant Personalization on Partner Websites option. 



Choose Your Privacy Settings ► Instant Personalization 



* Back to Applications 



Instant Personalization 



Our goal is to give you a great social and personalized experience with every application and website you use, 
We've worked with a select set of partners to personalize your experience as soon as you arrive on their sites . 

These partner sites {currently limited to Docs r Pandora, and Velp) can only access the information and content 
you've already made available to everyone, All our partners are required to respect your information and we've 
worked dosely with them to make sure they do. 

When you arrive atone of these sites, a blue notification bar will appear at the top of the page. Click "No Thanks' if 
you don't want to have a personalized experience on that site. 




Instant personalization is different from social plugins. Social plugin content comes directly from Facebook and no 
information is shared with the websites themselves. 

To turn off instant personalization on all partner sites, uncheck the box below. This will prevent these partners from 
receiving any of your information through instant personalization , even content you have made available to 
everyone. 

|"71 Enable instant personalization on partner websites. 



Figure 21.4. Disabling Facebook's instant personalization feature. 



That's it. By unchecking this one obscure option box, you ensure that 
Facebook no longer prompts you to nor automatically share your data with 
other websites. 



Removing Unwanted Fan Pages 297 



Removing Unwanted Fan Pages 



Something funny happened to me the other day. When I logged onto 
Facebook and started reading my News Feed, I discovered that Bruce 
Springsteen had left a message for me. This was a bit of a surprise, as I'm 
not close pals with the Boss; heck, we're not even Facebook friends, nor had 
I clicked to become a "fan" of his on the site. But now all of a sudden we 
were friends, and I was seeing all of his status updates in my News Feed. 

What's up with this? It's simple, really. Facebook decided to make me a 
"fan" of all of the musicians I said I liked in my profile. It also decided to 
make me a "fan" of all the books I mentioned in my profile, and all the mov- 
ies, and all the actors and actresses and hobbies and activities and every- 
thing else that was listed there. Man, I like a lot of stuff! 

To be fair, Facebook at one point displayed a window asking my permission 
to do this, in so many words. Heck, you probably saw a similar notice and 
did what I did, which was to give blanket approval. Not a good move, as it 
turns out, but one that can be corrected. 

If you want to remove your allegiance to unwanted fan pages, follow these 
steps: 

1. Click Account in the Facebook toolbar and select Edit Friends. 

2. When the next page appears, click Pages in the sidebar. 

3. Facebook now displays a complete list of all the fan pages to which you're 
subscribed, as shown in Figure 21 .5; there are probably a lot more here 
than you might have thought. To "unlike" a particular page, click the X on 
the far right side of the listing. 

When you "x"-out a page in this fashion, you're no longer a fan and will no 
longer receive updates from that person or company or group. Problem 
solved! 



298 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 



Create Hew List 



Airplane] Add to List -r X 

Movie 



El 


Al Stewart 

Musician/Band 


Add to List t 


X 


M 


App Store 

Product/Service 


Add to List ▼ 


X 




Blazing Saddles 

Movie 


Add to List v 


X 




Booker T And The Mgs 

Musician/Band 


Add to List ▼ 


X 




Books 

Interest 


Add to List ▼ 


X 


9 


Brian Wilson 

Musician/Band 


Add to List ▼ 


X 


m 


Brian no's Deli Italia 

Restaurant/Cafe 


Add to List ▼ 


X 



Bruce Spring steen Add to list ▼ X 

Musidan/Band 



Figure 21.5. Viewing— and removing— Facebook pages. (Hey, I'm friends with the 
Boss!) 



What to Keep Private— and What to Share 

All this discussion about configuring Facebook so that it doesn't share 
everything with everybody begs the question, just what should you share on 
Facebook? And is there a better way to keep your private details more pri- 
vate? 

First question first. What information is best kept private— or at least 
exposed only to your closest friends? This depends to a degree on your 
personal comfort level, and your personal life. But in general, you shouldn't 
share any information that might prove embarrassing to you or your family, or 
that might compromise your current job or future job prospects. 

Naturally, what all this means is going to differ from person to person. If you 
work for an ultra-conservative boss, for example, you might not want him to 
know that you're a dyed-in-the-wool liberal. And if all your friends are agnos- 
tics, you might not want to publicize that you're a born-again Christian. 



What to Keep Private -and What to Share 299 

But it goes further than that. If you're preaching the "just say no" drug mes- 
sage to your kids, you might not want to list Cheech & Chong's Up in Smoke 
as one of your favorite movies; it might compromise your integrity on the 
matter just a bit. For that matter, you might want to hide all those photos that 
show you drinking margaritas on the beach, for both your kids' sake and to 
ward off any awkward questions from teetotalling employers. 

In fact, pictures can be more damaging than words. A picture of you hold- 
ing a cigarette in your hand could be used by your insurance company to 
raise your rates. Photos of you partying hardy or just acting goofy can raise 
doubts about your decision-making abilities. Do you really want your boss 
or your kids or your ex-husband's lawyer to see you in compromising posi- 
tions? 

The same goes with what you post in status updates. There are stories, 
some of them true, of careless (and carefree) employees posting about this 
afternoon's golf game when they were supposed to be home sick from work. 
Employers can and will keep track of you online, if you're stupid enough to 
post all your comings and goings. 

And it's not just factual stuff. Spouting off your opinions is a common- 
enough Facebook activity, but some people will disagree with you, or take 
more serious offense. Do you really want to start an online flame war over 
something you posted in haste on your Wall? 

For that matter, it's a really bad idea to use Facebook to criticize your 
employer, the people you work with, or just people you associate with in the 
community. Posting about how much you hate your job will eventually get 
back to your boss, and then you've got a lot of 'splainin' to do, Lucy. 

You see, on Facebook, discretion is definitely the better part of valor. When 
in doubt, hide it. Or, better still, don't post it or upload it in the first place. It's 
okay to keep some thoughts to yourself; you don't have to post every little 
thing you think or that happens to you. 

Then there's the issue of your contact information. Here's what I think: You 
shouldn't make any contact information public. If someone wants to contact 
you, they can post on your Profile page or send you a Facebook message. 
They don't have to be able to contact you via regular email, ring you up on 
the phone, or show up on your doorstep. There are too many nutcases out 
there. Heck, there's just a lot of people I used to know that I don't want to 



300 CHAPTER 21 Keeping Some Things Private 

deal with any more. I don't want to make it easy for these people to get in 
touch with me. I prefer to keep my distance from them. 

Bottom line, then, is this: Be careful about the information you post. It's bet- 
ter to keep most of your personal information private. 

Protecting Your Kids — and Grandkids — on Facebook 

It's not just your own personal information you have to worry about on 
Facebook. If you have younger children or grandchildren online, you 
should be concerned about how they use the site, and what information 
they share. 

Here's the thing with younger folks on Facebook: They tend to be very, 
very open about their lives, to share just about everything with everyone. 
While you might have a few dozen friends, your kids will have hundreds 
of friends. Now, they don't know all these people personally, but they 
share all their innermost thoughts and personal information with them, 
anyway. And they think nothing of it. 

The problem is, everything that can come back to bite you about 
Facebook can hurt your kids, too. An ill-advised post about a hated 
teacher could put your child in hot water in school. A gripe about a boss 
can cost your child his part-time job. A nasty comment about another 
kid can result in an online flame war— or something worse. 

And, speaking of worse, check out some of the photos your kids and 
their friends post online. Yes, they're stupid enough to upload pictures 
of themselves doing all sorts of stupid, unethical, and sometimes illegal 
stuff. Drinking, smoking, drugs, sex, kids don't think twice about post- 
ing all sorts of compromising pictures. Not very smart of them, but then, 
how smart were you at that age? 

The point is, you need to monitor what your kids do online, and steer 
them away from the most damaging behavior. You probably can't keep 
them from making dumb posts, but you can discourage them from 
doing so— and, hopefully, delete offending posts or incriminating photos 
after the fact. Kids will be kids, after all, and there's only so much moni- 
toring you can do. 



What to Keep Private— and What to Share 301 

But that's not the only thing you need to be concerned about, especially 
with younger kids. Facebook can be home to dangerous predators, who 
use the site to befriend victims. There's nothing to say that the 13 year- 
old girl on your child's friends list is actually a 13 year-old girl; it could a 
40 year-old male predator, and you'd never know. 

To that point, you should stress to your kids the dangers of meeting up with 
anonymous "friends" from Facebook. It's okay to share messages online, 
but when it comes to meeting in the real world, extreme caution is called 
for. Your kids need to know that people aren't always who they say they are 
online, and that real dangers exist out in the world. They should never, ever 
arrange for an unescorted real-world meeting with a Facebook friend they've 
never seen in person before. If they insist on meeting up with an unknown 
"friend," make sure it's in a public place and be there yourself to supervise 
the meeting. Your children's safety is paramount, and no amount of social 
networking should get in the way of that. 



This page intentionally left blank 



CfMpter ff 



Managing Your 
Facebook Account 



We end our tour of Facebook for grown-ups by looking 
at all the settings in your Facebook account. We covered 
Facebook's privacy settings in the previous chapter, and that's 
a lot of the settings you can configure. But there's more, and 
you probably need to know how to edit them. After all, you 
need to let Facebook know if things change in your life. 



Changing Account Settings 



Your Facebook account con- 
tains your basic personal 
information— your name, 
email address, password, and 
the like. What do you do if 
you change your name after 
a divorce (or remarriage), 
get a new email account, or 
find that your password is 
compromised? Fortunately, 
Facebook lets you easily 
change all of these items. 

All you have to do is click 
Account on the Facebook 
toolbar and then select 
Account Settings. When the 
My Account page appears, 
click the Settings tab. As you 



v: 



If you're a woman and have 
been married at least once 
but you still want your high 
school friends to find you 
on Facebook, change your 
middle name on the Facebook 
site to include your maiden 
name— and any other mar- 
ried names you've collected 
previous to your current one. 
So, for example, if you were 
Tammy Smith in high school 
but are Tammy Borgendorfer 
now, you should call yourself 
Tammy Smith Borgendorfer 
on Facebook. This way any- 
one searching Facebook for 
Tammy Smith will still find you. 



304 CHAPTER 22 Managing Your Facebook Account 

can see in Figure 22.1, all your basic account information is here, including 
the following: 



My Account 



Networks Notifications Mobile tanguage Payments Facebook Ads 



Name 


change 


Your real name. 


Michael Miller 


Username 


change 


Your username 




Emai 


change 


Set your email contact information. 




Password 


change 






What you use to log in. 




Linked Accounts 


change 


Use other accounts to log in. 




Privacy 


manage 



Control what information you share. 
Account Security 
Deactivate Account 



change 



Figure 22. 1. Managing your Facebook account settings. 



Name: You can change your first, middle, and last names, as well as enter 
an alternate name (like a nickname) you'd rather go by. You can also select 
how you want your name displayed— first name first or last name first. 



(TZt^ 



• Username: This is a little different from a nickname. A Facebook user- 
name actually affects the URL, or Web 
address, of your Facebook Profile page. If 
you choose to enter a username, that user- 
name becomes your Facebook address. 
For example, if you choose the username 
"bobbysmith," your Facebook URL is www. 
facebook.com/bobbysmith. The problem 
with usernames is that all the good ones are 
probably already taken. What you have to 
do is enter your desired username, click the 



A 



If the obvious usernames 
are taken, try using alter- 
natives such as "bobby, 
smith," "bobby-smith," 
"bobbysmith2010," and so 
forth. 



Changing Account Settings 305 



Check Availability button, and see if it's free. If it is, great. If not, Facebook 
tells you so and you can try again. 

Email: This is the email address that Facebook uses to contact you. You 
can enter more than one address, and specify a given address as the main 
contact. You can also remove old or unused email addresses. The only 
thing is, you have to have at least one email address on file with Facebook, 
so they can contact you if need be. You don't have to display this address, 
of course; that's determined by your Facebook privacy settings, as dis- 
cussed in Chapter 21, "Keeping Some Things Private." 



Password: You can, at any time, change the 
the Facebook site. This is recommended if yo 
your password. Heck, it's good security to 
change your password periodically, just to 
keep the bad guys guessing. 

Linked Accounts: Facebook lets you link 
your Facebook account with other accounts 
you might have at the following sites 
and services: Google, MySpace, Yahoo!, 
Myopenid, Verisign PIP, and OpenlD. If you 
log onto one of these other sites and ser- 
vices, you are automatically logged onto 
Facebook, as well. 

Privacy: Don't be alarmed; this isn't a new 
set of privacy settings. When you click the 
Manage link in the Privacy section, you're 
taken to the Change Your Privacy Settings 
page we discussed in Chapter 21 . 

Account Security: If you like, Facebook can 
notify you if someone tries to access your 
account from a computer or mobile device 
you haven't used before. It's a nice security 
measure, but can also be annoying if it's 
you who's doing the accessing. 

Deactivate Account: Click here if you want 
to leave Facebook. We discuss this option 
at the end of this chapter. 



password you use to log onto 
u think someone has guessed 

L^Note i 

Learn more about Face- 
book's privacy settings 
in Chapter 21 , "Keeping 
Some Things Private." 






ote 



By default, you see 
Facebook in English. If 
English isn't your first 
language (and if that's the 
case, why and how are 
you reading this book?), 
Go to the My Account 
page, click the Language 
tab, and then select a dif- 
ferent language from the 
pull-down list. At present, 
you can view Facebook in 
everything from Afrikaans 
to Turkish and just about 
anything in-between. 



306 CHAPTER 22 Managing Your Facebook Account 

To change a given setting, click the Change or Manage link to the right of 
that item. This changes the My Settings page to display the relevant informa- 
tion for that item. For example, when you click Change Your Name, the page 
changes to that in Figure 22.2, with boxes First Name, Middle Name, Last 
Name, and Full Alternate Name, as well as a pull-down list to select how you 
want your name displayed (Display Full Name). Each item on this page has 
its own unique information boxes for you to work with. 



Name 






hide 


We confirm all name changes before 
patient. 

Display Full Name 
First Name: 

Middle name; 

[optional) 

Last Name: 

Full Alternate 

Name 

(npticnal) 


thev take effect. This will take approximately 24 hours, so please be 


Michael Miler 




H 


Michael 




ZZ 








C 




ZD 








Miller 




ZD 


BBBH 






C 




Z 


Note: Please enter a full name. This 
you by another name find you in search. 
m Also display on my profile and in 


Mill help people i 
search results 


"ha 'know 



Figure 22.2. Changing your name. 



Controlling When and How Facebook 
Contacts You 

Facebook is all about communication. So much so, that the site itself likes to 
communicate with you — more frequently than you might like, actually. 

That's right, Facebook is set up to send you all sorts of messages. By 
default, Facebook sends you an email when someone sends you a message, 
adds you as a friend, confirms a friend request, tags you in a post, tags you 
in a photo, comments on a photo in which you were tagged, invites you to 
an event, or just updates his or her own Facebook profile. That's a lot of 
messages— too many for my tastes. 

Fortunately, you can control which of these events triggers a message from 
Facebook— and whether you receive that message via email or on your 



Leaving Facebook 307 

mobile phone. All you have to do is click Account on the Facebook toolbar 
and then select Account Settings. When the My Account page appears, click 
the Notifications tab. 

As you can see in Figure 22.3, this page contains a ton of different activities. 
You can check the option to be notified of this activity via email or SMS (text 
message on your mobile phone). You can opt to be notified on both devices, 
on just one, or on neither. That's right, if you don't want to be notified when 
a particular event happens, just uncheck the boxes for that item. Make sure 
you click the Save Changes button at the bottom of the page when you're 
done. 



My Account 



Settings Networks 



Mobile Language Payments Facebook Ads 



Notifications 



Facebook notifies you whenever actions are taken en Facebook that involve you. 

Each Facebook application has its own notification settings. Click the checkbox to change the settings for that 
application, 



Send email notifications to 



when someone.. 



Send notifications to my phone via SMS, 



B Facebook 



□ 



SMS 

a 



Sends me a message 


El 


□ 


Adds me as a friend 


12 


□ 


Confirms a friendship request 


IB 


□ 


Posts on my Wall 


El 


□ 


Pokes me 


□ 


□ 


Has a birthday coming up [weekly email) 


□ 




Asks me to confirm friend detail 


El 




Requests to list me as family 


■ 




Confirms a family request 


■ 




Suggests a friend to me 


El 




Adds a friend I suggested 


El 




I invited joins Facebook 


m 




Tags me in a post 


m 





View Settings for: 

H Facebook 

Si Photos 

[jj| Groups 

£fl Pages 

[ai] Events 

G Notes 

O Links 

*£* video 

ffl Gifts 

jp Help Center 

$3 Wall Comments 

D Other updates from 
Facebook 

§H Other Applications 



Figure 22.3. Managing Facebook notifications. 



Leaving Facebook 



It happens. You give Facebook a spin but find it's just not for you. Maybe 
you're just not interested. Maybe you're too interested, and find it consuming 



308 CHAPTER 22 Managing Your Facebook Account 

too much of your time. Maybe you discover that none of your real friends and 
family members are using the site. 

Whatever the case, you can leave Facebook and delete your account. All you 
have to do is follow these steps: 

1. Click Account on the Facebook toolbar and then select Account Settings. 

2. When the My Account page appears, click the Settings tab. 

3. Scroll to the Deactivate Account section at the bottom of the page. 

4. Click the Deactivate link. 

5. You now see the Are You Sure You Want to Deactivate Your Account? 
page, like the one shown in Figure 22.4. (Facebook doesn't make it easy to 
leave, trust me— look at all the "so and so will miss you" photos along the 
top!) Select a reason why you're leaving from the list. 



Are you sure you want to deactivate your account' 

":■■ aiss you Kristi will miss you 




Send Tof a Message 



■: .■ : ' 



Send Sherry a Message 



Send Alec a Message 



Send Marl: a Message 



Why ace you deactivating: Q I have another Facebook account. 

O I spend too much time using Facebook, 



■ ' ■ I don't find Facebook useful. 

■ '_■ I don'tfeel safe on Facebook, 

■ "'■I don't understand how to use Facebook. 

This is temporary, I'll be back. 
i i I have a privacy concern. 

I get too many emails, invitations, and requests from Facebook, 
Q Other 



Please explain further 



Email opt out □ Dpt out of receiving future emails from Facebook. 

No-=: Ev=- — =- -_:==■-■-■ = :». :_---?-——-— -■.■-= -_ -- ±:±-—. ~z yo. " :■--.:■:-=. 
a- =e* y"- "- '--" :""_" = , '.' ~- -"-■_-. "_ .-. ■;'.' ■*:=■-'=--==.= ="■= ■ :• z"i-rs a.rd 

Delete Applications: rj Permanently delete all applications that I am the only listed developer of, 

[required) Nose: Yo_ e _ -e =z=z e: z~ = : - i-e . = iz= _ "i" z~= ~ z .. - : F :r: — z-zz :e: : - i, ''cu ithe! 

eilJier c= z-.z- ;■- n r ri' ■:■■'■'"="=." :- ■:■" ~.-=r~ :-= : -: = : —rivaling. 

Figure 22.4. Getting ready to delete your Facebook account. 



6. If you want to explain further, enter your reasons into the Please Explain 
Further box. 



Leaving Facebook 309 



7. If you don't want to receive future emails 
from Facebook, check the Email Opt Out 
box. 

8. If you want to permanently delete any appli- 
cations you might have developed (a long 
shot, to be sure, but required by Facebook), 
check the Delete Applications box. 

9. Click the Deactivate My Account button. 
That's it, your Facebook presence is deleted. 



r 



H-H 



Caution 



Know that anything you 
posted in the past, while it 
might not be on Facebook 
anymore, is still out there 
somewhere on the Web. 
When it comes to the 
Internet, nothing is ever 
erased; if it's out there 
once, it's out there forever. 



Getting the Most Out of Facebook — For Grown-Ups 

I've spent this entire book showing you how to use Facebook, with a 
particular emphasis on those features and approaches of interest to a 
slightly older audience— grown-ups, for want of a better word. But I'd 
like to wrap things up by talking about how Facebook works for grown- 
ups in the real world, just what you can expect to find when you go 
online and start getting all friendly like. 

When you first sign up for Facebook, your first group of friends will be 
those people with whom you communicate with on a fairly regular basis 
already. I'm talking co-workers, family members, close friends— any- 
body who's in in your email contact list. It's easy for Facebook to iden- 
tify these folks and hook you up, so these will be your first Facebook 
friends. While talking to these people on Facebook will be unique for a 
little while, it really doesn't offer a huge improvement over how you're 
already communicating. 

Next up, you'll probably track down and sign up other family mem- 
bers. Expect to add brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles, nephews 
and nieces, and children and grandchildren to your friends list. In this 
instance, Facebook ends up being a fairly convenient way to broadcast 
family information without having to write a lot of individual emails or 
make a lot of phone calls. If you need to report the latest medical emer- 
gency or work promotion or school accomplishment, just post a single 
status update and the entire family is notified. Easy as pie. 



310 CHAPTER 22 Managing Your Facebook Account 



The influx of family members should then inspire you to post a raft 
of family photos to the Facebook site. Thus inspired, prepare to set 
aside an evening or two to organize your digital photos and get them 
uploaded to Facebook. You may even want to upload some home mov- 
ies, if you have them in a handy digital format. Your family will appreci- 
ate the effort. 

Of course, while we're thinking about photos, you'll also be looking at 
the photos that your family members have uploaded. Chances are you 
haven't seen most of them, so you can spend some time catching up 
with your relative's activities, visually. 

Those of us in the working world will soon add our business associates 
to the list. I'm talking current and past co-workers, people we work with 
in other companies, folks we meet at business seminars and conven- 
tions, even other local businesspeople we know. Facebook is quite use- 
ful for keeping in touch with other professionals with whom we might 
not otherwise have regular contact. Just remember to keep things fairly 
professional when you're dealing with this group of friends. 

For many adult users, the next logical step is to add your neighbors to 
your Facebook friends list. This takes a bit more effort, as you actually 
have to know your neighbors' names (I don't, sorry to say) and then 
search for them on Facebook. While you're at it, don't forget to add 
those former neighbors with whom you've always meant to keep in 
touch, but haven't; they'll appreciate it. 

Finally, you're going to start getting curious about your old friends. I 
don't mean those people older than you, but those guys and gals you 
hung out with in your youth. I'm talking college pals, high school bud- 
dies, and the like. 

Now, tracking down old friends on Facebook is a bit of a challenge. You 
can search by name, of course, but good luck finding that one John 
Brown you used to hang with among the thousands of similarly named 
Johns on the Facebook site— especially as your Mr. Brown might be liv- 
ing in a different part of the country now. 

It's even worse trying to find women who've gotten married and 
divorced and married again (repeat as necessary). I'm sure you have 



Leaving Facebook 31 1 



no idea that the Sally Jones you went to school with in Chicago is now 
Sally McWhorter of Portland, Oregon. 

What you have to do to find these folks is just keep plugging away. 
Search and search and search some more, and don't forget to look 
on your friends' friends lists; it's possible that one of your friends has 
already found this person and done the connection thing. 

You should also be prepared to receive a lot of friend requests from 
people you know, people you think you might know, and people who 
you either don't remember or never heard of. That's part of participating 
in the Facebook community. Accept as many requests as you want, but 
pay particular attention to those who don't necessarily ring a bell; they 
may be some of your long-lost schoolmates that found you before you 
found them. 

It's also possible that they're people you went to school with but weren't 
necessarily close to. I can't tell you how many Facebook "friends" I have 
who know me from high school even though I barely, if at all, remember 
them. But that's okay; there's no harm connecting with these folks in the 
virtual manner, at least that I can tell. 

When you do connect with old friends, be prepared for some major 
shocks; there's been a lot of stuff happening since you last talked. 
People get married, get divorced, move, change jobs, have kids, even 
change sexual persuasions. I admit to being a little surprised at the 
handful of formerly straight friends who now say they're gay; I'm equally 
surprised to find the occasional minister or priest on my old friends list. 
(None of us were priests back then, I can tell you.) 

You might also be surprised— and a little shocked— to see what your old 
friends look like these days. I admit that I've aged, there's no denying 
that, but some of my friends... well, the years have not been kind. It's 
interesting to try to connect the dots between what someone looked like 
in high school and what they look like today, but I swear, some of these 
odd-looking ducks are strangers just claiming to be the same people I 
used to know. There's no resemblance there that I can see. 

You also need to be prepared by what your old friends are doing and 
saying and thinking. When you hang out with a bunch of kids in high 



312 CHAPTER 22 Managing Your Facebook Account 

school, you all tend to think and act alike. What a shock, then, to find 
old friends who have become ultra-conservative right-wingers, tree-hug- 
ging environmentalists, religious cultists, free love swingers, or whatever. 
You might think you knew them then, but they're not necessarily the 
same people today. Life does that to you. 

In fact, I guess that's the true lesson we learn from connecting with 
friends and family on Facebook: Life goes on. And Facebook, fortu- 
nately, helps us catch up and stay caught up with the lives of everyone 
we know. That's what I like about Facebook, and why I use it every day. 
I think you'll find it useful and interesting, too. 



Me 



6)0 



Symbols 



?Hugs, 244 



accepting friend requests, 61-62 
access levels for groups, 229 
accounts 

account settings, changing, 303-306 

creating, 24-25 

creating multiple, 34-35 

deactivating, 305-309 

acronyms, list of, 122-123 

active group participation, 226-228 

admins for groups, 223-224, 229 

Adobe Premiere Elements, 169 

advertisements on Home page, 39 

Advertising page, 40 

AIM (AOL Instant Messenger), 137-138 

albums. See photo albums 

All Listings from... tab (Facebook 
Marketplace), 278 

allowing applications, 247-249 

alternate identity, creating, 87-89 

America Online, 11 

AOL Instant Messenger (AIM), 137-138 

applications, 10, 243-246 

allowing, 247-249 

blocking posts from, 254-255 

deleting, 250-251 

editing settings, 250-252 

finding, 246-247 

games, 254 

hiding updates from, 72-73 

list of most useful, 252-254 

smartphone connections, 267-269 

viewing list of, 249-250 
Applications link, 40 



Are You Sure You Want to Deactivate Your 
Account? page, 308 

attaching 

events to status updates, 111-112 

links 

to messages, 133-134 
to status updates, 112-113 

photos 

to messages, 131 

to status updates, 109-110 

videos 

to messages, 132-133 
to status updates, 110-111 
attachments, sharing, 75-76 



B 



Birthday Calendar, 253 
birthday notifications, 194-195 
blocking 

application and game posts, 254-255 

people, 99-100 
blogs, 11, 22 
bookmarks, 22 

boxes on Profile page, changing, 206-208 
browsing 

applications, 246-247 

Facebook Marketplace, 275-277 
Bumper Sticker, 244 
Business Cards, 253 
business contacts 

finding, 237-238 

managing, 238 
business networks. See networks 



captcha, 25 
Causes, 244, 253 



314 INDEX changing 



changing 

account settings, 303-306 

passwords, 305 

privacy settings, 291-295 

chat (Facebook), 138-139. See also 
instant messaging 

configuring settings, 143-144 

finding friends for, 139-141 

from iPhone, 266-267 

messages versus, 144 

resizing window, 142 

starting, 141-143 

with your children, 139 
children 

chatting with, 139 

friending, 85-91 

personal information, viewing, 91-92 

protecting on Facebook, 300-301 

viewing status updates, 86-90 
Choose Your Privacy Settings page, 291 
choosing. See selecting 
Circle of Moms, 253 
classmates, finding, 59-60 
Classmates.com, 11 
closed groups, 229 
Close Listing dialog box, 284-285 
commenting 

on Facebook Marketplace listings, 280 

via iPhone, 259 

on photos, 162 

on status updates, 73-74, 89-90 

public nature of, 83 
communication 

via Facebook, 309-312 

forms of, 8-9 

real-world versus social networks, 
16-17 

community pages, 220 

company networks. See networks 

CompuServe, 11 



configuring 

account settings, 303-306 

chat settings, 143-144 

privacy settings. See privacy settings 

connections 

from iPhone, 257-259 

chatting, 266-267 

posting status updates, 261-262 

uploading photos, 262-264 

viewing friends' profiles, 265 

viewing messages, 265-266 

viewing News Feed, 259-261 

from smartphones, 267-269 

from text messages, 269-272 

contact information, privacy issues, 212 

contacting 

Facebook Marketplace sellers, 
280-281 

grown children via Facebook, 90-91 

contacts. See business contacts; friends 

content of status updates, examples of, 
118-120 

co-workers, finding, 57-59 

Craigslist, compared to Facebook 
Marketplace, 285-286 

custom friends lists 

creating, 93-95 

deleting, 98 

editing, 95-97 

viewing status updates from, 97 
Customize Settings page, 293-295 
customizing 

groups, 231-232 

Profile page. See Profile pages, 
personalizing 

custom sharing option, 293-295 



Deactivate link, 308 

Deactivate My Account button, 309 

deactivating accounts, 305-309 



Facebook for iPhone application 31 5 



deleting 

applications, 250-251 

custom friends lists, 98 

Facebook accounts, 307-309 

friends, 53, 98-99 

messages, 129 

photos, 155 

sidebar boxes from Profile page, 207 

status updates, 1 1 8 

videos, 175 
denying friend requests, 62 
discussions in groups, 226-228 
Discussions tab on fan pages, 216 
displaying Video tab, 170 
downloading photos, 149, 163-164 



eBay, compared to Facebook 
Marketplace, 285-286 

editing 

application settings, 250-252 

custom friends lists, 95-97 

personal information, 208-211 

photo albums, 158-160 

photos, 154-155 

in sidebar boxes, 207 

video information, 174-175 

videos, 169 
email, messages versus, 126-127 
email addresses 

changing in account settings, 305 

finding friends by, 60-61 

email contacts, finding friends via, 54-56 

email invitations, RSVPing to events, 191 

embedding videos, 176 

employers, personal information available 
to, 241-242 

employment, searching for, 239-241 

employment information on profile 
page, 27 



ending Facebook Markplace listings, 
283-285 

Epicurious, 11 

events, 15, 185-186 

attaching to status updates, 111-112 

creating, 192-193 

inviting friends to, 192 

RSVPing, 187-190 

searching for, 186-187 

selling tickets to, 196 

sharing, 189-190 

viewing, 194 
Events link, 40 



Facebook. See also social networks 

accounts. See accounts 

applications. See applications 

Help Center, 46-47 

history of, 12 

how not to use, 16-17 

how to use, 14-16 

importance of friends, 53 

overview, 12-14 

profile page. See profile page 

requirements, 23-24 

searching, 44-46 

signing in, 38 

signing off, 46 

usage patterns for, 17-18 

Facebook for iPhone application, 
257-259 

chatting, 266-267 

friends' profiles, viewing, 265 

messages, viewing, 265-266 

News Feed, viewing, 259-261 

posting status updates, 261-262 

uploading photos, 262-264 



316 INDEX Facebook Marketplace 



Facebook Marketplace, 1 

browsing, 275-277 

categories, 274-275 

compared to eBay/Craigslist, 285-286 

contacting sellers, 280-281 

explained, 273-274 

item listings. See item listings 

searching, 277-278 
Facebook toolbar, 42-44 
FamilyLink, 244, 253 
Family Tree, 253 
fan pages, 213-215 

community pages versus, 220 

creating, 217-218 

finding, 216-217 

inviting friends to, 219 

liking, 215 

navigating, 215-216 

for potential employers, 241 

removing, 297 
FarmVille, 244 

file formats for videos, 168-169 
filtering events, 186 
finding. See also searching 

applications, 246-247 

business contacts, 237-238 

fan pages, 216-217 

friends. See friends, finding 

groups, 224 
Flickr, 12 

former classmates, finding, 59-60 
former co-workers, finding, 58-59 
forums, 10 

frequency of status updates, 123-124 
friending 

business contacts, 237-238 

defined, 53 

your children, 85-89 



friend requests 

accepting, 61-62 

denying, 62 
friends. See also business contacts 

blocking, 99-100 

chatting with from iPhone, 266-267 

communicating via Facebook, 
309-312 

custom lists 
creating, 93-95 
deleting, 98 
editing, 95-97 
viewing status updates from, 97 

finding, 25-27, 51-53 
for chatting, 139-141 
co-workers, 57-58 
from email contacts, 54-56 
former classmates, 59-60 
former co-workers, 58-59 
friend suggestions, 62-63 
friends of friends, 63-64 
from IM contacts, 56-57 
by name or email address, 60-61 
narrowing search results, 65 

hiding, 71-72 

importance on Facebook, 53 

inviting 

to events, 192 
to fan pages, 219 
to groups, 232-233 

limit on number of, 53 

number of, 100-101 

Profile pages. See Profile pages 

real-world versus Facebook, 16-17 

shortcut buttons for, creating, 259 

Status Update feed, viewing, 71 

status updates. See status updates 

tagging 

in photos, 155-156 

in status updates, 1 13-114 

in videos, 1 74 



iPhone, connecting to Facebook 31 7 



unfriending, 98-99 

viewing applications list, 249 

viewing groups of, 226 
Friends link, 40 
Friends Online area, 41 
Friendster, 12 
friend suggestions, 62-63 

G-H 

games, 10. See also applications 

hiding updates from, 72-73 
Games link, 40 
GoodReads, 253 
Google Talk, 138 
grammar of status updates, 121 
groups, 10, 221-223 

access levels, 229 

active participation, 226-228 

admins, 223-224, 229 

creating, 228-231 

customizing, 231-232 

defined, 13-14 

finding, 224 

inviting friends to, 232-233 

joining, 225 

for networks only, 230 

officers, 223 

passive participation, 226 

professional networking in, 239 

reconnecting with, 234 

tabs on pages, 223 

viewing, 225-226 

Groups link, 41 

grown children, contacting via Facebook, 
90-91 

HD videos, 184 
Help Center, 46-47 



hiding. See also privacy controls 

application updates in News Feed, 
72-73 

Facebook information from other 
websites, 295-296 

friends in News Feed, 71-72 
history 

of Facebook, 12 

of social networks, 11-12 
home movies. See videos 
Home page 

elements of, 38-41 

News Feed. See News Feed 

Photos link, 165 

Status Update feed, viewing, 71 

status updates, posting, 107 

Honesty Box, 244 

Houses category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

HQ videos, 184 



I 



ICQ, 137 

iHeart, 244 

iLike, 253 

iMovie, 169 

Info tab (Profile page), viewing, 80-81 

instant message (IM) contacts, finding 
friends via, 56-57 

instant messaging, 137-138. See also 
chat (Facebook) 

inviting friends 

to events, 192 

to fan pages, 219 

to groups, 232-233 

iPhone, connecting to Facebook, 
257-259 

chatting, 266-267 

friends' profiles, viewing, 265 



318 INDEX iPhone, connecting to Facebook 



messages, viewing, 265-266 

News Feed, viewing, 259-261 

posting status updates, 261-262 

uploading photos, 262-264 
item listings (Facebook Marketplace) 

commenting on, 280 

creating, 281-283 

ending, 283-285 

responding to, 280-281 

sharing, 279 

viewing, 278-279 
Milage, 11 

J-K-L 

job hunting, 239-241 

Jobs category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

Jobster Career Network, 253 

joining 

groups, 225 

networks, 236-237 

kids. See children 

leaving Facebook, 307-309 
liking 

fan pages, 215 

status updates, 74 
linked accounts, 305 
Linkedln Profile, 253 
links, attaching 

to messages, 133-134 

to status updates, 112-113 

Listing Details tab (Facebook 
Marketplace), 278 

listings (Facebook Marketplace) 

commenting on, 280 

creating, 281-283 

ending, 283-285 



responding to, 280-281 

sharing, 279 

viewing, 278-279 
lists. See custom friends lists 
LivingSocial, 244 

M 

Mafia Wars, 244 

managing Facebook notifications, 
306-307 

Marketplace. See Facebook Marketplace 

MeetingWave, 253 

messages 

chat versus, 144 

deleting, 129 

email versus, 126-127 

explained, 125-126 

links, attaching, 133-134 

photos, attaching, 131 

reading, 127-129 

replying to, 127-129 

reporting spam, 129 

sending new, 130-131 

sharing events as, 190 

sharing photos as, 157-158, 165 

sharing videos as, 176 

videos, attaching, 132-133 

viewing from iPhone, 265-266 

Wall-to-Wall conversations versus, 
134-135 

writing on friends' Profile pages, 108 

Messages link, 40 

microblogging services, 22 

mobile connections. See connections 

Most Recent link, 39, 70 

movies. See videos 

moving photos between albums, 155 

multiple Facebook accounts, creating, 
34-35 

mutual friends, finding, 63-64 



photos 31 9 



MyCalendar, 253 
My Diet, 253 
MySpace, 12 



N 



names 

changing in account settings, 304 

finding friends by, 60-61 
narrowing search results, 65 
navigating 

fan pages, 215-216 

Profile pages, 77-79 

navigation column on Home page, 39-41 

networks, 235-236. See also professional 
networking 

group availability to, 230 

joining, 236-237 

school networks, 236 

New Photo Uploader, 152 

News Feed, 38-39. See also status 
updates 

blocking application and game posts, 
254-255 

commenting on posts, 73-74 

defined, 14 

hiding 

application updates, 72-73 

friends, 71-72 

liking posts, 74 

sharing attachments, 75-76 

Top News versus Most Recent 
links, 70 

viewing, 67-70 

on i Phone, 259-261 

status updates, 15 

videos in, 180-181 

News Feed link, 40 

notifications 

of birthdays, 194-195 

managing, 306-307 



O-P 

officers of groups, 223 

online availability, determining, 139-141 

Open Graph technology, 290 

open groups, 229 

organizing photos, 158-160 

parents, chatting with your children, 139 
passive group participation, 226 
passwords 

changing, 305 

security of, 25 
personal information 

availability to employers, 241-242 

changing, 208-211 

privacy, 211-212, 291-292 

on profile page, 29-34 

viewing, 80-81, 91-92 

personalizing. See customizing 

PetVille, 244 

phones, activating for text messaging, 
269-271 

Photo Album Downloader, 164 

photo albums 

creating, 151-152 

editing, 158-160 

moving photos between, 155 

uploading photos to, 152-154 
Photobucket, 12 
photos 

attaching 

to messages, 131 

to status updates, 109-110 

commenting, 162 

downloading, 163-164 

organizing, 158-160 

printing, 163 

profile photo, 28, 203-205 



320 INDEX photos 



sharing, 10, 15, 147 

advantages of Facebook, 148-150 
creating photo albums, 151-152 
deleting photos, 155 

disadvantages of Facebook, 

148-150 
editing photos, 154-155 
friends' photos, 163 
as messages, 157-158 
methods of, 165 
moving between albums, 155 
as status updates, 157 
uploading new photos, 152-154 
tagging, 155-156 
tagging yourself, 163 
uploading from iPhone, 262-264 
viewing, 81-82, 160-162, 258 
Photos link, 40, 165 

Photos tab (Profile page), viewing, 81-82 
Pinnacle Studio HD, 169 

posting status updates from iPhone, 
261-262 

Post Listing dialog box, 282-283 

Post to Profile dialog box, 279 

posts. See status updates 

printing photos, 149, 163 

privacy 

of contact information, 212 

of personal information, 211-212 

privacy settings 

changing, 291-295 

choosing what to keep private, 
298-300 

explained, 289-290 

Facebook's recommended privacy 
settings, 293 

hiding information from other 
websites, 295-296 

for photos, 148 

protecting children on Facebook, 
300-301 



on status updates, 114-118 

removing unwanted fan pages, 297 

Privacy Settings page, 291-292 

private communications, 10, 15. See also 
messages 

Prodigy, 11 

professional networking 

availability of personal information, 
241-242 

business contacts, 237-238 

in groups, 239 

job hunting, 239-241 

networks 

explained, 235-236 

joining, 236-237 
Profile pages 

defined, 13, 41-42 

description of, 199-200 

employment information, 27 

of friends, writing messages on, 108 

navigating, 77-79 

personal information, 29-34, 80-81 

personalizing 

for job hunting, 240 

personal information, 
changing, 208-211 

sidebar boxes, changing, 206-208 

tabs, changing, 205-206 

Wall posts displayed, 200-201 

Wall settings, 201-202 
photos, viewing, 81-82 
profile photo 

changing, 203-205 

uploading, 28 
school information, 27 
status updates, posting, 107 
Video tab, displaying, 170 
tabs, viewing, 82-83 
viewing, 76-77, 265 
Wall, 79-80 



social bookmarking services 321 



Profile picture 

changing, 203-205 

uploading, 28 

protecting children on Facebook, 
300-301 

public nature of comments, 83 

Publisher box, 107 



Q-R 



reading messages, 127-129 

real-world communication, social 
networks versus, 1 6-1 7 

recommendations. See suggestions 
for friends 

reconnecting via groups, 234 

recording videos 

for Facebook, 167-168 

from webcams, 172-174 

refusing. See denying 

removing fan pages, 297 

Rentals category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

replying to messages, 127-129 

reporting spam messages, 129 

requirements for Facebook, 23-24 

resizing Chat window, 142 

resolution 

for photos, 149 

of videos, 183-184 

responding to Facebook Marketplace 
listings, 280-281 

RSVPing to events, 187-188 

from email invitations, 191 

from event page, 188-190 

from status updates, 190 



school information on profile page, 27 
school networks, 236 



searching. See also finding 

applications, 247 

for events, 186-187 

Facebook, 44-46 

Facebook Marketplace, 277-278 
search results, narrowing, 65 
secret groups, 229 

secretly friending your children, 87-89 
security, passwords, 25 
selecting 

friends, strategies for, 100-101 

Wall posts for display, 200-201 

sellers (Facebook Marketplace), 
contacting, 280-281 

selling 

items on Facebook Marketplace, 
281-285 

tickets to events, 196 

sending new messages, 130-131 

Services category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

Share box, 1 07 

sharing. See also privacy settings 

attachments, 75-76 

choosing what to share, 298-300 

custom sharing option, 293-295 

events, 189-190 

Facebook Marketplace listings, 279 

photos. See photos, sharing 

videos, 175-176 

YouTube videos, 177-179 

shortcut buttons for friends, creating, 259 

sidebar boxes on Profile page, 
changing, 206-208 

signing in to Facebook, 38 

signing off Facebook, 46 

Simple Uploader, 152 

Skype, as instant messaging service, 138 

smartphones, connecting to Facebook, 
267-269 

social bookmarking services, 22 



322 INDEX social media 



social media, 21 

social networks. See also Facebook 

defined, 8, 22 

guidelines for, 19-21 

history of, 11-12 

real-world communication versus, 
16-17 

reasons for using, 8-9 

tools offered by, 10 

types of users, 10-11 
Sony Vegas Movie Studio HD, 169 
spam messages, reporting, 129 
spying on your children. See children 
starting chatting, 141-143 
Status Update feed, viewing, 71 
status updates. See also News Feed 

acronyms, list of, 122-123 

announcing groups, 232 

commenting on, 73-74 

defined, 8, 14 

deleting, 118 

events, attaching, 111-112 

explained, 105-107 

frequency of, 123-124 

friends, tagging in, 113-114 

grammar of, 121 

guidelines for, 19-21 

hiding, 71-72 

liking, 74 

links, attaching, 112-113 

in News Feed, viewing, 67-70 

photos, attaching, 109-110 

posting, 108, 261-262 

privacy controls, 114-118 

RSVPing to events, 1 90 

sharing 

attachments, 75-76 
events as, 189 
photos as, 157, 165 
videos as, 1 75- 1 76 



videos, attaching, 110-111 

viewing, 15, 97 

what to write, 118-120 

when job hunting, 241 

where to post, 107-108 

of your children, viewing, 86-90 

Stuff category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

suggestions column on Home page, 39 

suggestions for friends, 62-63 



tabs 

on group pages, 223 

on Profile page 

changing, 205-206 
viewing, 82-83 
tagging 

friends in status updates, 113-114 

photos, 155-156 

videos, 174 

yourself in photos, 163 

text messages, connecting to Facebook, 
269-272 " 

Tickets category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 275 

tickets to events, selling, 196 

toolbar (Facebook), 42-44 

topic-oriented community pages, 
community pages versus, 220 

Top News link, 38, 70 

TripAdvisor, 254 

tweets, 22 

Twitter, 22, 254 

u-v 

unfriending, 53, 98-99 
updates. See status updates 



YouTube videos, sharing 323 



uploading 

photos, 152-154,262-264 

profile photo, 28 

videos, 170-172 

usage patterns for Facebook, 1 7-1 8 

usernames, changing in account 
settings, 304 

Vehicles category (Facebook 
Marketplace), 274 

videos 

attaching 

to messages, 132-133 
to status updates, 110-111 

deleting, 175 

editing, 169 

embedding, 176 

file formats, 168-169 

information, editing, 174-175 

recording 

for Facebook, 167-168 
from webcams, 172-174 

resolution, 183-184 

sharing, 175-176 

tagging, 174 

uploading, 170-172 

viewing, 180-183 

YouTube videos, sharing, 177-179 
video sharing, 10, 15 
Video tab, displaying, 170 
viewing 

applications list, 249-250 

events, 194 

Facebook Marketplace listings, 
278-279 

friends' profiles from iPhone, 265 



groups, 225-226 
messages from iPhone, 265-266 
News Feed, 67-70, 259-261 
personal information, 80-81, 91-92 
photos, 81-82, 160-162,258 
Profile pages, 76-77 
Status Update feed, 71 
status updates, 15, 86-90, 97 
tabs on Profile page, 82-83 
videos, 180-183 

Wall-to-Wall conversations, 134-135 
Visual Bookshelf, 254 

w-z 

Wall, on Profile pages, 79-80 

Wall posts, selecting for display, 200-201 

Wall settings, changing, 201-202 

Wall-to-Wall conversations, 134-135 

webcams, recording videos from, 
172-174 

Weekly Schedule, 254 

Welcome link, 40 

The WELL, 11 

weRead, 249 

Where I've Been, 254 

Which Star Trek Captain Are You?, 244 

Windows Live Messenger, 138 

Windows Movie Maker, 169 

work networks. See networks 

writing messages 
on friends' Profile pages, 108 

Yahoo! Messenger, 137 
your children. See children 
YouTube videos, sharing, 177-179